Mjolnir Mallet

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About: YouTuber and Maker of Geek-Dad-DIY projects - It’s basically nostalgia with power tools

Intro: Mjolnir Mallet

Wood mallets are a common tool in a wood shop. Often used and super useful, they are an essential tool to have in your belt. Well, maybe not in your belt specifically, but essential to have. So if you need a mallet, why not make one that let's you harness the power of Thor?!? Assuming you're worthy, of course

Step 1: Materials

The materials I used for the mallet are:

a piece of 4/4 maple
a piece of 2/4 black walnut
BBs
Wood glue
Clamps
A strip of leather
Chisels
Dremel
Blowtorch

Step 2: Head Assembly

I started by cutting the maple to 2 pieces at 6" x 4 3/4", then cut out 2 pieces of the black walnut at that same size. I cut the piece of the walnut in half, then bored a 1" hole in the middle of each piece of the walnut.

Taking one of the pieces of maple, I marked the center point and then figured a good width for the handle, and set and glued the walnut pieces at a slight angle so that the top was a little wider than the base.

I then filled the holes in the walnut with BBs. At this point you can decide if you want a dead blow effect in your mallet or not (dead blow minimizes the strike impact and bounce of a hammer). If you do, simply glue the other side of the maple on top at this point. If you don't want your mallet to have a dead blow effect (like I did), add glue to the BBs, then glue the top maple piece on. This will hold the BBs in place and not create a dead blow effect.

Step 3: Handle Assembly

For the handle, I cut out 2 - 3" strips of the maple that were 11" long, and also cut a strip of the walnut at the same length. I then ripped the walnut strip down to 3/4" thick. I took the pieces then glued and clamped them together.

Step 4: Shaping the Head

To begin shaping the head of Mjolnir, I set my saw to 15 degrees and cut off the end edges. Next, I set my saw to 45 degrees and cut off the surface edges. These angled cuts gave the head piece the recognizable shape of Mjolnir.

Step 5: Shaping the Handle

I measured the depth and opening of the inset in the head piece, then matched those measurements to the handle piece. I then cut out one side of the handle to be the insert for the head piece. I bored 2 - 1/2" holes into the insert section, then cut lines from the edge to the holes for the wedge pieces later.

To shape the handle, it's best to use a lathe. But since I didn't have a lathe, I used a finger planer and chisels to create the round shape of the handle. I would suggest the former method as it would save you A LOT of time.

Step 6: Designing the Head and Handle

Using a simple Celtic knot as a reference, I drew the design on the 15 degree angled sections of the head, then used a chisel to etch out the designs on each of the angled faces.

I drew wavy lines on the handle, then used a Dremel to etch out the designs on the handle

Step 7: Pommel and Strap

I took a piece maple scrap and drew out a simple pommel for the base of the handle. After shaping it out on a belt sander, I drew a simple knot design on the pommel and then etched it out with a Dremel.

Cutting a slit through the base of the pommel for the leather strip to feed through, I cut a strip of leather wide enough for the slit, then fed it through the pommel and sewed the ends together.

Step 8: Torch and Final Assembly

At this point you can use a wood burning knife (or something similar) and burn the etched inlays of the designs you made on the head, handle, and pommel. I wanted to go for a weathered/scorched look, so I took a blowtorch and singed the designs into the hammer.

Using 2 small angled pieces of scrap maple, I hammered them into the slots I cut in the handle piece, and wedged the handle into the angled insert of the head piece. I cut a small circular piece, and glued it to the top of the hammer, completing the final look of the hammer.

Step 9: Harness the Power of Thor!

Now you are ready to wield the hammer of the God of Thunder! Again, assuming you're worthy of course.

If you want to see more projects I've made, check out my YouTube channel here

Or you can follow me for a behind the scenes look at my projects on Instagram @iamthebeardlessman

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    19 Discussions

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    Bustaflow25

    3 months ago

    I'm almost done, your directions are super easy to follow and execute. Annnnnnnnnnd my Makerspace has a Lathe but I forgot how to use it. So I used a sander to shape the handle... it takes forever lol.

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    TheBeardlessManBustaflow25

    Reply 3 months ago

    Sweet! Yeah, having a lathe would make the process of making the handle much easier, but is not totally necessary

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    AlexT306

    3 months ago

    This project is great and looks awesome! How would you say this compares to a store bought mallet?

    1 reply
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    TheBeardlessManclark5113

    Reply 4 months ago

    Did they ever show Grabthar's hammer in Galaxy Quest? That would be fun one to build

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    clark5113TheBeardlessMan

    Reply 4 months ago

    I don't think so but that's what came to mind when I saw your build.

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    TheBeardlessManclark5113

    Reply 3 months ago

    I could! It would be one of those obscure projects that only a few people would get the reference for, but it would still be fun to build

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    clark5113TheBeardlessMan

    Reply 3 months ago

    I think you'll be surprised at those who will get the reference.

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    mummmmmeager

    Question 4 months ago on Step 9

    I am a little confused about Step 2 where you wrote:

    "I then filled the holes in the walnut with BBs. At this point you can decide if you want a dead blow effect in your mallet or not. If you don't, simply glue the other side of the maple on top at this point. If you don't want your mallet to have a dead blow effect (like I did), add glue to the BBs, then glue the top maple piece on. This will hold the BBs in place and not create a dead blow effect."

    Which method (with or without BBs) adds the "dead blow effect"? It looks like you are saying that both versions do not create the effect. I would also respectfully suggest that you add a sentence explaining the "dead blow effect" to help new woodworkers recognize the term. Thanks for a great instructable--my son is ready to try it since he loves both woodworking AND Thor!! ;-P

    1 more answer
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    TheBeardlessManmummmmmeager

    Answer 4 months ago

    You know what, that was a typo on my part. It should read "if you DO want the dead blow effect, simple glue the other side of the maple on". I will change that. Thank for catching it!

    With the BBs loose and not glued down is what creates the dead blow effect. It minimizes the rebound of the hammer when it hits something, unlike the bounce you get when you hit something with a non-dead blow hammer.

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    Alex 2Q

    4 months ago

    Really nice work! I had pretty much the same idea for some time but you beat me to it ;) Well there are plenty of other comic items that are waiting to be made real .

    You should enter this Instructable in the woodworking contest!

    1 reply