Modern Geometric Steel Chiminea

2,824

57

11

About: When curiosity and inspiration collide, passion is born. Made x Us is our journey as the things in our lives evolve into obsessions. Ranging from beautiful design to home renovations projects, from coveted f...

Make this modern geometric chiminea yourself using 16 gauge sheet metal and 3 tools:

  • Angle Grinder - with grinding wheel, flap disc and cut off discs
  • Drill with wire brush attachment
  • Mig Welder

Make sure you watch the Youtube video!

Supplies:

  • 4' x 8' sheet metal (16 gauge)
  • Rustoleum High Heat Paint
  • Mineral Spirits

Teacher Notes

Teachers! Did you use this instructable in your classroom?
Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson.

Step 1: Purchase Material - 16 Gauge Sheet Metal

Purchase a 4' x 4' sheet of 16 gauge sheet metal from a metal supply store. These generally come in 4' x 8' sheets, but your metal supplier can cut them down to the 4' x 4'. If you purchase a 4' x 8' sheet you will have enough metal to make 2 chimineas.

Step 2: Measure and Cut Sheet Metal

Reference the cut sheet to measure and cut your sheet metal. The base of the chiminea should be an isosceles triangle. So each piece should measure 24” at the base, and each angle should be 60 degrees.

Step 3: Clean Edges of Metal and Prepare for Welding

Clean the edges of the cut metal with the wire brush attachment on your driver or with a flap disk to prepare for welding.

Step 4: Tack the Back and Front Pieces Together

Lay once piece flat and use something to prop up the top piece up at approximately 60 degrees. I used a piece of old plywood. Position and tack the back together. Once the back is secure, lay the front piece and tack to the bottom. Since this piece is square, you will have a little pice of the rectangle protruding out. Make a field cut to make ti flush with the angels of the structure.

Step 5: Tack the Base Plate On

This step will require some field cuts. Tack the base plate to the bottom making sure it is parallel and level to the ground. Note in the video I used two scrap pieces since that’s all I had. They were not exactly the right size, but I had to make field cuts to make it flush with the edges.

Step 6: Run Beads in Along All Joints

Your Chimnea should be taking shape now. Go back and weld beads on all of the joints to strengthen the structure. I ran beads inside and outside of the structure. If you’re new to welding, the welded do not need to be clean. We’ll clean this up in a few steps.

Step 7: Grind Down Welds and Spatter (if You Used a Flux Core MIG Welder)

Use a flap disc on your angle grinder to clean up the welds and spatter on the outside of the chimnea. Run the disc on any rust or scale to remove.

Step 8: Field Measure, Cut, and Weld Top of Chiminea

This may be the most important step which will make your project unique. Get the chiminea top piece and find an angle that you like. Make sure the opening is big enough to allow you to put logs and wood. Once you have found angle to your liking, use some clamps, or a helper to hold it in place, while you trace the lines for cutting. Once you have traced your lines, cut the pieces to size with your grinder and cut off wheel, then switch to you flap disc to clean the edges to prepare for welding. Now tack the top into place. Once secure weld beads on both sides.

Step 9: Finish and Paint (optional)

Your chiminea is now ready to be painted if you choose to do so. Some people like the natural rusted look. I decided to finish mine to have a matte black finish. I used mineral spirits to wipe down the chiminea. Once that dried I sprayed on some Rustoleum High heat Matte black paint. This gave it a nice modern look.

Follow the paint manufacturer's directions for proper dry times. Once the paint is completely dry, light it up and enjoy the fireworks!

2 People Made This Project!

Recommendations

  • CNC Contest

    CNC Contest
  • Make it Move

    Make it Move
  • Teacher Contest

    Teacher Contest

11 Discussions

0
None
M3G

7 weeks ago

Looks fantastic, I'm a sucker for anything geometric.

1 reply
0
None
Made_x_UsM3G

Reply 7 weeks ago

I'm glad you like it. I'm a sucker for anything geometric too! funny enough turning it into a chimnea was an after thought, but the angles the top plate brings really makes it unique.

0
None
jeanniel1

7 weeks ago

Wow! Question: Is the base where the wood sits canted back away from the front a bit so that the wood or ashes won't accidentally fall out?

1 reply
0
None
Made_x_Usjeanniel1

Reply 7 weeks ago

It doesn't but it's something that you can easily add to the design. I haven't had many issues so far, but just make sure you don't overload it with wood.

0
None
dkistner

7 weeks ago

This is gorgeous. I could never make one myself, but might consider buying one if for sale.

2 replies
0
None
Made_x_Usdkistner

Reply 7 weeks ago

If you're in Southern California we can probably figure something out.

0
None
dkistnerMade_x_Us

Reply 7 weeks ago

I wish. Unfortunately, I'm stuck in Georgia!

0
None
bart01

7 weeks ago

The sandels frightened me somewhat. It could really spoil your day if a piece of sheet metal falls on your foot. But the end result is really great.

1 reply
0
None
Made_x_Usbart01

Reply 7 weeks ago

Haha. My wife says the same thing. Definitely not a good idea, but I live in sunny San Diego and it was a hot and humid day.