Non-Human Threatening Power Loader

Listen, I'm here to tell you something. I'm no engineer, scientist, or mathematician. In fact, whenever something goes on the fritz in my house, I'll guarantee you it gets resolved from some outside help. Now with that out of the way, I have to explain something to the average layman when it comes to the construction of an Aliens Power Loader. First of all you've got to ditch the stilt idea. It might be a little cool- and even authentic- but you don't need to wind up in the hospital over it. While there is an obvious, given design to adhere to, its construction should be simple and as cost effective as possible.

Supplies:

Abundance of cardboard, duct-tape, hot glue, plastic cat food containers, and yellow and black spray paint for starters.

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Step 1: Next Critial Step....YOU'LL NEED SOME ROOM!

Obviously, this is not a Mickey Mouse project. You're going to need a big enough area not only to set up your construction supplies, but to have your willing (or in some cases) unwilling model to move around.

Step 2: Start to Create Associations

At this point, after a shot or two of whiskey, you'll begin to wonder just what the heck you got yourself into. Don't fret. It's all about associations at this point. The overall shapes you see when you look at an actual Power Loader. No not the one on that space ship fighting aliens in space. Ones preferably of your peer group have built. Since the overall design is going to maintain some level of consistency, it is a good thing to examine how those who labored hours, days, or even months have done it. You'll start to see squares connected to triangles, some PVC, maybe even Styrofoam. Regardless, it's how you're going to build it that counts.

Step 3: WTF Moment

Everyone has them; might as well add another one to the pot. Things can't always run smoothly. You're initial design might seem too anemic or the arms might be too close to the body. Always check, double check, and then check again using your model.

Step 4: It's Finally Miller Time.

After you've conducted your pacing tests, stress tests, and every other conceivable test imaginable. Get one unbiased opinion about it. Ask someone for any further ideas to improve your masterpiece. Some times even a cat will do.

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    jessyratfink

    8 weeks ago

    I like your way of thinking! Looks great even without the stilts :D

    1 reply