Old Fashioned Drawer Pulls

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Intro: Old Fashioned Drawer Pulls

In an attempt to organise all the small things flooding the house, I decided to build a set of drawers in a recess of a wall from an early building expansion.

As I wanted a lot of drawers, I would need a lot of hardware, which would be the most expensive part of the project.

Furthermore, in a house a century old, I thought some hand-crafted pulls would fit in nicely.

This project can be fullfilled with hand-tools only, but I used a drill-press, a table-saw and a disc-sander as well.

Step 1: Design

There are a lot of different variants of this type of pulls, and I chose the simplest with a straight lower edge and an arc as the upper edge.

Then I made a sketch with the proper measures and transferred the sketch to the wood.

Step 2: Make a Die

With the layout on a piece of pine, I hollowed it with an iron. I suppose you can grind it if you want, but it is very easy and more satisfactory to do it by hand, not to mention avoiding noise and dust .

There was no need to make it perfect, since I wanted a rustic look, and I´m not a silver-smith.

Step 3: Cut and Drill the Plates.

I used 2mm Aluminium, which I cut in squares and trimmed off the superfluous corner;

a certain overhang is needed though, as the metal stretches.

A simple template is needed to punch the drilling-marks, and I felt no need to drill by hand.

Step 4: Screw the Piece of Plate to the Die.

Use the 2 holes you need to screw the pull to the drawer, and a third that helps holding down during the chase to fix it to the die.

Step 5: Hammer Away

Use a hammer with a ball-head to form the handle.

This is not difficult at all, and takes only minutes;

it is not silver, and no-one will scrutinize it.

Step 6: Trim the Edge

I felt no need to use hand-tools here either, so I simply cut the edge on the table-saw.

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Step 7: Smooth the Edge.

Unscrew and start rounding the edge with files and sanding.

Step 8: Cut the Upper Side.

Use a simple template to mark the cutting line and remove the waste with a pair of scissors or a bandsaw.

Step 9: Sand or File the Upper Edge

If you care for a perfect arc, make a jig.

Since I like the individual look the hand-crafted artefacts have, I trusted my eye for an even edge.

After the rounding of the corners, this is ready to be mounted on the drawer, no finishing needed.

Step 10: The Result

Now comes the difficult part:

making a storing-system that works, and keeping all things in their places.

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    14 Discussions

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    altomic

    22 days ago

    I love it. thanks for posting

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    spiderbear

    23 days ago

    Beautiful and tougher than anything store bought! I just finished a kitchen hutch which needs drawer pulls. These are perfect.Thank you for posting!

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    grapenut

    4 weeks ago

    elegantly simple, useful, and sturdy. Thanks

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    marksstudio

    4 weeks ago

    Wonderful Instructable! Trimming that aluminum edge on the table saw gives it a good look too. Nice job man.

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    allangee

    4 weeks ago

    I would definitely recommend AGAINST running metal through your table saw (for a number of maintenance and safety reasons) but other than that, nice work and instructable.

    .

    Gets me to wondering if you could make a male and female "mold" and press the initial shape using a hydraulic jack or something... then peen it into the final.

    2 replies
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    MartinV46allangee

    Reply 4 weeks ago

    Since it was mentioned that used metal was *aluminium*, then it is totally ok to run this thru machines that you use for woodwork. Alu is so soft metal that it has no greater wear and tear on your blades than for example oak.

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    zpsajkallangee

    Reply 4 weeks ago

    I`m happy to contribute to this creative site, and pleased with the positive response,
    but it seems you all overestimate the effort needed to cup a soft metal like aluminium.
    I only needed 3 dozen handles, so it was quickly taken care of, but if you intend to
    make large quantities, you can probably make a press-tool that not only forms the cup
    but also punches out the handle from the plate simultaneously.

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    mattl

    4 weeks ago

    Very nice work! This has me inspired to create a replacement one for an old damaged one I can’t find a replacement for.

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    DIYJRAY

    4 weeks ago

    Wow, very cool! Tapping out handles from metal opens up a lot of possibilities.

    I wonder if you could get a useable handle if you used a soda can.

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    Perilla

    4 weeks ago on Step 8

    Nice instructable-very useful. I am now thinking of other applications. Thank You.

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    seamster

    4 weeks ago

    These look great. This is something I'll definitely try next time I need some drawer pulls. Thank you for this excellent guide! : )

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    Kink Jarfold

    4 weeks ago on Step 10

    Whew! I'm exhausted just thinking about all that peening. But what a fantastic result you got!

    KJ

    06jn13d4.png
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    tercero

    4 weeks ago

    Wow. Now THAT'S dedication.

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    kenbob

    4 weeks ago

    beautiful. thanks for sharing!