PVC Bench-top Bike Repair Stand

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The picture is from the starting line at Grandma's Marathon in Duluth, MN. I'm in there somewher...

Intro: PVC Bench-top Bike Repair Stand

A simple and inexpensive bike repair stand for the bench-top. It's not quite as sturdy as the commercial floor-standing models but it works really well and you can spend the money you save on that Campy derailleur set you've always wanted.

Step 1: Cut PVC Parts to Length

Parts List (PVC is 1 1/4" schedule 40):
(4) Tees
(2) 90 degree elbows
(2) 45 degree elbows
(4) Splices - 2"
(1) Lower upright - 7 1/2"
(1) Upper - 9 1/2"
(1) Horizontal extension - 4 1/4"
(2) Utility hinges - 1"
(1) Clasp
(2) Galvanized conduit clamps - 1 1/2"
Foam pipe wrap
PVC glue

Step 2: Cut the Tee for the Clamp

I used a band saw to cut in half the PVC tee used to make the clamp. The cut needs to be pretty straight in order for the clamp to hinge properly.

Step 3: Assemble

Dry assemble all the PVC parts and mark them with a Sharpie for proper alignment when you're ready for final assembly. Glue all the pvc joints. You might want to take the extra step of cleaning all joints with PVC cleaner. You don't want your stand falling apart and your bike crashing to the floor.

Install the hinges and clasp on the tee you cut in half to finish the clamp assembly.

Step 4: Attach to the Bench Top

Position the front legs of the stand near the front edge of the bench and use the 1 1/2" conduit clamps to hold the back of the stand securely to the bench.

Step 5: Use It

Wrap a 4" piece of foam pipe wrap around the seat post of your bike to protect it. Open the clamp and lift the bike so the seat post is inside the open clamp. Close the clamp and secure the clasp. Work on your bike.

2 People Made This Project!

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42 Discussions

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jcharbonnet

3 years ago on Introduction

is it cheaper to buy the pvc and do it your self or buy on off of ebay

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ymizrachi

4 years ago on Introduction

great! thanks for the plans.

the stand flexes a bit so i had some 2 part high density polyurethane foam laying around. just filled the pipes with it and it feels really strong now. it wont flex anymore and you can hammer out the headset like on a pro workshop stand..

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ymizrachi

4 years ago on Introduction

great! thanks for the plans.

the stand flexes a bit so i had some 2 part high density polyurethane foam laying around. just filled the pipes with it and it feels really strong now. it wont bent and you can hammer out the headset like on a pro workshop stand..

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ymizrachi

4 years ago on Introduction

great! thanks for the plans.

the bike still moves a bit so i had some 2 part high density polyurethane foam laying around. just filled the pipes with it and it feels really strong now. it wont bent and you can hammer out the headset like on a pro workshop stand..

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Old Duf Fuss

5 years ago on Step 3

WOW!!! Pure simplicity and soooo elegant!!!
Love it!!
Thank you.

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NSDude

11 years ago on Introduction

Thanks for the design! I had to use ABS plastic tubes instead of PVC because Kent didn't have much PVC (4" was the smallest). Still worked out great. The T's aren't as good as the ones you have pictured and my clamp is a little sketchy (I just use a hand clamp just incase over the hinge) I added another tubing section to help with the weight as I could see my bike drifting slowly to the floor with the original design. It just sits directly underneath the top (see pic). All in all though cost me $45 CAD at kent to do. thanks!

C:\Documents and Settings\HP_Administrator\My Documents\My Pictures\2007_08_06\IMG_1486.JPGC:\Documents and Settings\HP_Administrator\My Documents\My Pictures\2007_08_06\IMG_1492.JPGC:\Documents and Settings\HP_Administrator\My Documents\My Pictures\2007_08_06\IMG_1488.JPGC:\Documents and Settings\HP_Administrator\My Documents\My Pictures\2007_08_06\IMG_1496.JPGC:\Documents and Settings\HP_Administrator\My Documents\My Pictures\2007_08_06\IMG_1489.JPGC:\Documents and Settings\HP_Administrator\My Documents\My Pictures\2007_08_06\IMG_1478.JPG
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shewittiNSDude

Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

I believe you are using a Y connector to fit the additional stability support. I have got a strong feeling that you could have foregone the two splices, the tee and 45 degree connectors right underneath. That would have allowed you to directly insert the foot of the new support straight into the front base. The result, I believe, will be use of less material (clutter), more strength and stability. On the down side, it will also mean resizing the two original down tubes. I am planning to do mine along that line and will post pictures and measurements of design modifications.

I like the design and the well Thought of laying it out, But i used
Galvanized Pipe instead of PVC and With all the Work on doing repair of Bicycle's
I have found out that using Galvanized Pipe I could have put up 3 to 5 Bike on their own Maintenance Bike Holder. Job well done.

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Hey, love the instructable, I was all prepared to spend the 150 dollars on the pro bike stand until I saw this one. Just wondering, do you need to bend or manipulate the hinges to get them to fit? 5 stars, great project.

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Joe_080

11 years ago

Here is one I built with a threaded union, like randytrant suggested, on the end so I can turn it vertical for the seat post and horizontal to hold in other positions.

DSC00058.JPGDSC00057.JPGDSC00059.JPG
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ebradyJoe_080

Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

I know it has been a while since this as posted, but how do you prevent the bike from tilting once you have it in the proper position? I did this modification with the union also, however the front of the bike very slowly tilts to the floor as I am working on it.

Details of my work can be found here.

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ebradyebrady

Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

After using the stand with union joint, I found the bike tends to rotate out of position over time. I tweaked the design a little bit using a cheap $3 gasket set. Additional details can be found here.

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imarunner2Joe_080

Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

Now this is what Instructables and collaboration is all about! Randy and Joe, thanks for your contributions!

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jon e rock

11 years ago on Introduction

how does the pvc tubing actually go into the elbows and tees? the elbows and tees i have are threaded so the pvc tubing doesnt go in all the way. dumb question i know, but im new to this. thanks.

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jon e rockimarunner2

Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

thanks for getting back to me. what i mean is, my elbows/tees are threaded so i am wondering how to screw the pvc tubes into them. or did i buy the wrong elbows/tees. are there non threaded elbows/tees?

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imarunner2jon e rock

Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

Hmmm... the more common elbows and tees, at least where I live, are not threaded. Threaded parts require matching male and female threaded parts. With the non threaded parts you can cut pipes of the right diameter to any length and glue them into the female elbows and tees. So, if you can find non threaded parts where you are then yes, you'll want to use them to follow this instructable.