Passive Irrigation System Sand Filter From Scrap!

Published

Introduction: Passive Irrigation System Sand Filter From Scrap!

About: I am a teacher who enjoys environmentally responsible woodworking. Most evenings will find me in the shop working with my now 8 year old son Shay who is both my greatest helper and biggest fan.

My well was plugging the sprinklers I use for irrigation with sand particles that passed through the well head. Tired of cleaning the sprinkler screens I decided to tackle the issue at its source and trap the sand as it leaves the pump.

The principles at work are similar to those used in mining, create a temporary slowing of the water stream and the particulate will drop out. It is important to use a much larger pipe than you do to cary the water. When the water enters that larger pipe it slows because there is more diameter to move through. This is not a loss of flow or pressure, just that the water that jets along in a 3/4 inch line plods along in 3 inches. The particulate drops to the bottom of the plastic pipe and drops down into the sediment trap. Simple as that. The larger diameter pipe you use, the finer the sediment you will capture. I was using scrap I found but if I was buying I would use 4 inch pvc, shorten the main filtering run to 14 inches and all other pipe lengths from 10 inches to 6 inches. Or scrounge scrap and build as needed like I did. It isn't rocket science, slow the water, collect the sand, provide way to drain it out every few years. It works and there is nearly no maintenance and no replacing of screens of filter media.

Share

    Recommendations

    • Backpack Challenge

      Backpack Challenge
    • Water Contest

      Water Contest
    • Stick It! Contest

      Stick It! Contest

    2 Discussions

    Any feedback on its effectiveness in practice.

    Does the waste pipe and fittings hold up to the system pressure?

    RL