Pickled Eggs

About: I am a photographer, a tinker, an electronics technology engineer, and author; I write short stories and poetry for the love of writing. I started writing poetry in high school over thirty years ago where I ...

Pickled eggs make a great hors d'oeuvres to serve at a party; whether they are served whole, or as deviled eggs, they make a great taste treat for your guests. Reputed to stave off hangovers, many bars and taverns put them out for free to their drinking customers. The last time I was at a bar the bar wanted $1.50 each for pickled eggs, so if you like a pickled egg with your beer these cost me $3.50 a dozen to make at home.

Peeling hard boiled eggs and garlic in mass can be tedious, I have an amazingly easy way to peel hard boiled eggs perfectly in ten seconds that will astound you. And a neat trick you have got to try, peeling a cloves of garlic with ease in seconds.

A 1 pint or 500 ml jar holds 6 small eggs or 4 large eggs.

Step 1: Ingredients & Supplies

6 Small Eggs or 4 Large Eggs for every pint; hard boil a couple extra just in case they are needed.

1 Yellow Cooking Onion the size of a medium egg.

Garlic I like 1 clove for each egg.

Apple Cider Vinegar

White Vinegar

Water

Sea Salt or Coarse Pickling Salt

Pickling Spice

Black Peppercorns

Measuring Cup

Table Spoon

Pickling Funnel

Ladle

Pot

6 x 500 ml or 1 pint canning jars

Step 2: Hard Boiling

Keep the egg crates I like to use them to store the eggs overnight before peeling.

Place the eggs in a large pot and cover with cold water and add a little salt. Do not try to hard boil too many at one time. I never go any deeper than one layer of eggs, this helps prevent the shells from breaking.

Bring the water to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the pot from the burner rinse the eggs in cold water.

Place the eggs into the egg crates to protect them and refrigerator over night. I find the eggs peel easier if they are very cold from sitting in the refrigerator overnight.

I started with 3 dozen and only 30 made it to the pickling jars.

Step 3: Peeling the Eggs

Now this is a neat trick you have got to try, you can peel an egg in ten seconds this way.

The next morning peel each egg one at a time by placing the egg in a jar with just enough cold water to cover the egg.

Place the lid on the jar and shake, not to hard just enough to break the shell.

Dump the egg out and the egg shell practically falls off the egg without any effort.

Step 4: Peeling the Garlic

Peeling garlic can be tedious and time consuming, this easy way to peel garlic you must try.

Break up a bunch of garlic and place it in a jar.

Close the lid and shake the jar vigorously until you see the skins coming loose.

Poor it out onto a bowl and separate the cloves from the skins.

Sort out any wilted or soft cloves of garlic.

You can cut off any bad spots and still use the clove.

Step 5: Packing the Jars

Do not over pack the jars; the eggs swell a little in the brine and they will be impossible to get out of the jar. So stick to 6 small eggs or 4 large eggs to a 1 pint jar.

Peel and slice a cooking onion about the size of a medium egg, you want 1 slice for every jar.

I like to add 1 clove of garlic per egg in the spaces between the eggs.

Sprinkle a few pepper corns on top.

Since I wanted a couple jars of spicy pickled eggs I added a Red Tie pepper to two of the jars.

Last I add a slice of onion to the top.

Step 6: Making the Brine

In a saucepan, combine two cups apple cider vinegar, one cup water, one tablespoon pickling spice and one tablespoon salt.

Bring to a rolling boil and simmer until the salt dissolves.

Using a ladle and the pickling funnel, pour the brine over the eggs in the jars.

Place the lids on the jars loosely

Step 7: Sealing

Place the jars in a pot.

Add water and a splash of white vinegar to the pot.The white vinegar prevents minerals from the water collecting on the pot and the jars.

Bring the water to a boil, then reduce the heat so it just simmers for ten minutes.

Tighten the lids and let the jars cool to room temperature.

Once you here the lids pop the jars are sealed.

You can now store the jars in a cool dark place or the refrigerator.

Step 8: Serve

Refrigerate the pickled eggs for 3 days to 1 week before serving.

When the eggs are cured you can serve them whole or as your favorite hors d'oeuvres.

They make a wicked deviled egg, I used the slice of onion and one of the pickled cloves of garlic in the yoke filling.

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    8 Discussions

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    trexalou

    20 days ago

    This is a great idea. But I do have two suggestions. First, to properly can something requires water over the top of the jars by at least 1". The purpose is to drive out the air in the jars to create a vacuum. Simply heating without sufficient coverage and letting the lids pop is basically the same as putting the food in a Tupperware on the shelf. Second, and just as important to safety, is that pickled eggs are only safe as a refrigerator pickle. There are no processes that have been tested to be safe (not anecdotal, but scientifically tested) for shelf storage of eggs. (commercially canned eggs have preservatives in them which most home canners do not use.) They do great in the fridge, though. I can provide links to the testing, but I don't know the rules about links to the outside here.

    I really love the pickled egg idea and this sounds like a fabulous recipe, but please consider revising to show they are only safe as a refrigerated item. I WILL be trying these as fridge pickles this summer. :)

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    bbqandbeertrexalou

    Reply 6 days ago

    Our local cash & carry sells them buy the gallon and the only 2 preserves in it is the salt and vinegar.

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    gralan

    21 days ago

    Your instructable is clear and easy to comprehend. I also like your tricks for the egg-shelling and garlic-peeling. I grew up eating pickled eggs, homemade as well as purchased at stores, clubs, taverns, etc. I'm glad to see you promoting them is such fine fashion.

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    Josehf Murchisongralan

    Reply 21 days ago

    Thanks
    You have got to try peeling your eggs that way, you will love it.

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    AnandM54

    27 days ago

    I don't hear about pickled eggs before ...!!!! Tasty nice !!

    1 reply
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    Josehf MurchisonAnandM54

    Reply 27 days ago

    Thousand year old eggs are just pickled hard boiled duck eggs pickled in lime. It is a very old dish.