Pliers Organizer Thingy

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About: My Grandpa got me into wood working when I was five years old. Ever since then I have been hooked. I love creating something out of nothing, making something old new or using trash to make something beautifu...

I have a small but mighty shop. It’s taken me years to get it to the point that it is now and it will keep evolving for years to come. My shop is fluid, ever changing depending on new interests or passions. Every once in a while, I will retire a well loved tool or jig or shelf or container but more often I will simply add to the already crowed small area.

Due to the small area I have to work with, organization is key. Some of my greatest shop improvements were not shiny new tools but storage solutions for sand paper or screws or hammers. My pliers organizer is one of my favorites. I stumbled upon the idea somewhere floating around the internet but I could not find the plans anywhere. So iI figured it out I love how it turned out. I have been using this organizer in my shop for about two years and it works fantastic. I thought I would make another one for our orchard shop and share it here. As alway, thanks so much for reading and enjoy my pliers organizer thingy.

Andy

Step 1: What You Need

What you need-

These are the supplies I used but all tools and supplies can be substituted.

3/4 or 1/2 hard wood ply

about a 2’ by 4’ should do

1/4 ply

Wood glue

3’ of small diameter rod

Table saw

Sliding miter saw

A lot of pliers

It is a pretty short list

Step 2: Cuts

I started out cutting two pieces of ply wood 7” by 15” These will be the sides and the main structure. I then cut a 45 degree angle at the top of the pieces. I started the cut about an inch from the back of the board.

Then I cut the back of the organizer. The back piece was 14.5” by 15”. I wanted the full width to be 16”. When the first three pieces were cut I moved on to cutting the slots for the dividers.

Of course we know that wrenches come in all sorts of shapes and sizes so the so the size of the slots in my pliers organizer can be different as well. I made my slots between 1” and 1.5”. Most regular pliers will fit in an one inch slot but some do call for a little more room. I used my sliding miter saw to cut shallow channels an inch apart. I find that two passes of my saw blade makes a channel wide enough for a 1/4” piece of ply. I cut all my channels and then checked to make sure the plywood would slide into each one. If there was one that was too tight, I went back to the saw and went over it one more time. After the channels were done I made the center piece. This needs to have the channels cut into it as well but it is very important that they line up exactly. To make sure this was the case, I lined the the section that I had just cut as a cutting guide. I went through the same process as before until all the channels lined up.

Step 3: Dividers

I used 1/4” hardwood for the dividers. I started out by cutting 11 dividers at 3” by 6”. Then I cut a 45 degree angle at the top of all of them so you could have better access to the tool. Then I took the whole stack to the drill press and drilled a 1/2” hole through the upper part of the dividers. Again it is very important that all of the holes are in the exact same spot so when you run the rod through, it will not get hung up.

Step 4: Glue Up

I laid down a small line of glue in each channel and placed the dividers in. Then I took the center piece, (make sure that the channels are cut for the opposite side before the glue up) glued that one as well and carefully lined it up at the bottom of the 45 degree cut. I put the sides on to hold it square and tacked it with a couple of Brad nails.

With the second section you just do the same as for the first one. You can play around with the width of the opening depending on the size wrench you want to put in. I did the final glue up and then attached the side with glue and Brad nails.

Step 5: The Rod

All of the hole had been drilled and lined up so it was time for the rod. I’m sure a wood dowel would work great but I had a bunch of these steal rods laying around so I went with those. I cut them to 17” and rounded the ends to avoid any cuts.

I pushed the rod through all of the holes I had pre drilled and it fit pretty well. Not perfect but pretty good. Actually the slight offset of the holes put some pressure on the rod so it feels nice and tight. That’s a win.

Step 6:

And that’s really it. This was a pretty straight forward project that really turned out nice in the end. It is very handy for those of us with a large variety of wrenches. It makes them very visible and keeps them compact and organized. I highly suggest you give this project a try. If you have any question please ask.

Thank you so much for reading and I hope you enjoyed my pliers organizer.

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23 Discussions

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Yonatan24

2 months ago

I don't think you need the dividers, I epoxied a bend rod to my tool wall, and none of the tools ever fall over, here's a picture from a few years ago, now I have fewer tools on it: https://cdn.instructables.com/F72/BBFG/IRXTCTNH/F...

You can also use the exposed rods to hold locking pliers (referring to your organizer).

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ClenseYourPalletYonatan24

Reply 2 months ago

You are correct. The dividers are unnecessary.... but they look really cool.

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Codswallop

2 months ago on Step 3

I suppose you use whatever you have for shop-made fixtures, so I would make the dividers out of masonite

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JAMESM466

2 months ago

I could definitely use one of these. The only difference I'd incorporate was not putting a bottom on it. I know that I'd eventually drop something in there, and the prospect of taking all the pliers out in order to up-end the rack is a non-starter. Great job.

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CodswallopJAMESM466

Reply 2 months ago

Not sure there actually is a bottom on this, but you really don't need a bottom. Just a place for dust to collect.

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ClenseYourPalletJAMESM466

Reply 2 months ago

Thanks so much!! Glad you liked it. I guess I didn’t take a clear picture of it but there is no bottom to this. In my shop many of my channel locks are really long and hang out the bottom. I would definitely drop something down there if there was bottom...

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RobertC2JAMESM466

Reply 2 months ago

The steel rod holds the pliers... the bottom is not really needed. Omitting it solves your impossibly unlikely problem from even happening.

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throbscottleJAMESM466

Reply 2 months ago

Better yet, have a slide out tray-for-catching-dropped-things.

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throbscottle

2 months ago

I might have a go at this, it would take rivet gun and tin snips and teeny tiny pliers too. But what's a good simple way to slot in the dividers without a cross-cut or table saw being available?

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ClenseYourPalletthrobscottle

Reply 2 months ago

I think the easiest way to cut the slots without sliding miter saw would be just a skill saw. Might need to make more passes due to the blade width but it should work fine. You could use a framing square as a guide.

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throbscottleClenseYourPallet

Reply 2 months ago

Sorry I don't know what is meant by "skill saw". I only have hand tools + drills.

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ClenseYourPalletthrobscottle

Reply 2 months ago

Sorry about that.... a skill saw is another name for a circular saw( hand held power saw). If you’re just using hand tools, cutting the slots in plywood would be very difficult. I would suggest maybe going with sriltk’s idea and forget about the dividers and just use the rod. It may not look as tidy but it would still work great. Hope it goes well for you. Also, I checked out your instructables and your spot welder is awesome!

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throbscottleClenseYourPallet

Reply 2 months ago

Hmm, I like the dividers though. I'll think of something. Thanks for the compliment, though to be honest it looks better than it works! Needs a better design and more conductive/tougher electrodes.

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srilykthrobscottle

Reply 2 months ago

You could actually skip out on the dividers if you wanted. The other option would be to either route or chisel out some slots. None of those sound like a lot of fun :)

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Loosestrife

2 months ago

Beautiful work. I especially like how you can see exactly which plier you're going for, because the business ends are exposed. This leads me to my first personal quibble with this design.
See, I'm a klutz, and can see myself stabbing and puncturing my fingers when reaching hastily.
But it's hard to fault the ingenuity and skill involved in producing such an efficient, elegant item.
Since I'm in true confession mode, though, I'll admit also to being lazy. My "tool wall" is a partial sheet of 1/2" plywood, to which all manner of tools are mounted in rather a haphazard manner. My solution for pliers, such as it is, is to use pockets. Over time, as robust flannel shirts and old jeans get retired, I'll cut the pockets off ( back ones for jeans ), including a generous flap of cloth at the top. They get screwed into the plywood, and voila. The stitching on most of these type of pockets is quite sturdy, and I can ( and do ) chuck the heaviest Vice-Grips into the pockets with abandon. The name of the tool is scrawled above the pocket with a Sharpie.

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fast vic

2 months ago

Great idea, l have been tripping over my bucket of pliers for years.l now have them off the floor and ready to use when needed. Thank you so much for this. Vic

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ClenseYourPalletfast vic

Reply 2 months ago

The bucket of tools is something I struggled with as well. Hope this helps

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pgs070947

2 months ago

What great tools pliers are, plus all the variants like snips, side-cutters, scissors?, Moles, pincers and so on. Like a surgeon about to operate. Same principal, mechanical advantage, pivot, long arm, short arm and gravity to hang them with. I must use pliers every day for something or other.I like it.