Raspberry Pi Accessories Tin

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About: I love to hack things or make new ones.

After waiting several months, my Raspberry Pi finally arrived. As it comes quite naked, you need some accessories to use it.
First you need a SDCard to store your operating system, then you need some connection to a display, if you use it for penetration testing like I do, you may want a WiFi and a Bluetooth dongle and finally you have to connect a keyboard and a mouse. So as there are only two USB ports you'll need an USB hub too. I don't want to carry all those parts flying around in my messenger bag, so I thought it'd be nice if I had a little box for all that parts. What's better than a classic ALTOIDS tin?

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Step 1: Parts

First I grabbed all the stuff I wanted to have in the tin:

- HDMI to DVI adapter
- SDCard(s), maybe you want different images
- WiFi dongle
- Bluetooth dongle
- USB hub and cable

Step 2: Getting All the Part Into the Tiny Box

The dimensions of an ALTOID are limited, so I tried several layouts.  After a few tries, everything fitted. Thanks to Tetris... ;)
As you can see you'll have two layers.  The base layer contains everything besides the hub and the cable, which will be the second floor. Use a pencil to mark the positions of the parts.

Step 3: Filling the Space

I don't want parts flying around o i grabbed some foam rubber that was lying around. I cutted it to the shapes of the parts.
You can use a scissor, a really sharp knife and the lucky ones of you may have a laser cutter for this. You can do this much better, if you spend more time on it, but you see, even if you just spend a few minutes it's quite ok. I glued the foam rubber in the box, so it stays in place.

Step 4: Ready to Go

Wait until the glue dried, then put your stuff in the box. As you can see all basic parts fit into the tin. I added two rubber bands just to make sure it stays close. Actually it would work without them, but now really nothing can fall out. Decorate the tin if you want, maybe you'll spraypaint it. Or you design a sticker  for the tin. The template will help a lot.

Now have fun with your Raspberry and please don't forget to vote :)

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    4 Discussions

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    fNXamandaghassaei

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    Sorry, no. I grabbed it from my junk pile. I think I ripped it from an old and broken tool box. You can use any foam or rubber that's sturdy enough to cut.

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    crgfrench

    6 years ago on Introduction

    Nice job! I'll make one too. Since you're using the Altoids tin for accessories, why not use another one for the Pi itself -- please see my instructable for that. https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Raspberry-Pi-Case-From-an-Altoids-Ti/

    Screen Shot 2013-01-05 at 1.58.17 AM.png