Real Solar Lighting

Introduction: Real Solar Lighting

This is an easy way to add light anywhere you need it without running wires and dealing with all the expensive solar equipment. 

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Step 1: Build It

Take a normal 20 ounce coke bottle and wash it out. Fill the bottle with water and add one bottle cap full of bleach. Fill to the very top leaving no room for a air pocket and then cap it.  Now you can remove the label.  

Next, drill a three inch hole in your roof and install the coke bottle. Silicone all around it to keep the roof from leaking.

On the inside you will have to strap the bottle in place so it will not fall out. Silicone the underside of the roof and let sit for about six hours before removing the strap. 

There you have it. A solar light that is equal to a 40 watt soft light bulb with now wires, solar equipment or the expense. 

This light was installed into a solar bathhouse built at http://moderndayredneck.blogspot.com

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    3 Discussions

    0
    diy_bloke
    diy_bloke

    6 years ago on Introduction

    I have installed these a lot in the Philippines, but just to be sure I always run a support wire under the bottom.
    That plastic lid sadly is not so UV resistent but it will hold

    0
    diy_bloke
    diy_bloke

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Used a lot in the Philippines to light up rooms that have no windows.
    The luxury version in europe (made from aluminium) will set you back 200 euro's

    0
    AtomRat
    AtomRat

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Is the purpose of the bleach to keep the water from making algae and to keep it clear? Very simple and useful idea by the way, I could have used this as a lighting solution in a friends mud-brick house a few years back. He ended up using petrol generator powered lights, shame.

    I think a simple support frame can be made to hold it in place a bit tighter as really heavy rain may cause the whole lot to burst through. ( I'm only saying this over personal experience, silicone sealing in roofing, and south east Australian rains that flood us out at least 10 times a year )

    Its extremely bright as well. I have seen professional installed / manufactured solar lights like this ( but cylinders ) producing massive amounts of light.. enough to light up the whole room with only 3 i think!