Dent Repair - Speaker's Dust Cap

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Introduction: Dent Repair - Speaker's Dust Cap

About: Hi I'm Angelo (TechBulder)! I am a college student taking my engineering majors in BS-EE/ BS-ECE at the DLSU. I use my course as an inspiration for making my current projects! I've been posting projects here...
Today I am going to show you how to repair a dent on a speaker's dust cap. When it comes to speakers without grills, people usually punch or push a small dent on a speaker's dust cap. The dent doesn't actually affect the speaker's performance but rather it becomes eyesore, dents make speakers look ugly. I found a fast and easy way to restore the original shape of a speaker's dust cap.

What Is A Dust Cap?

A dust cap is the semicircular dome found in a speaker's cone. From its name, the dustcap prevents the speaker's coil form collecting and storing dust from the outside.

Here's A Video:

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Step 1: Tools and Materials

For this project you will only need 3 tools to fix the dent dusted cap. The tools can be found in every household. The three of them are very common and can be found everywhere.

Tools An Materials:
(click on item where to buy)

- Black Marker
- Long Nose Pliers
- 2 Thin Needles

Step 2: Making a Hooked Needle

Get your pliers and slowly bend the needle at a 45 degree angle. Be sure to bend it slowly or else the needle might break, needles break easily.

Step 3: Puncture the Dust Cap

Puncture the dust cap with the needle you just bent, then pull it in a slanting position. The hooked end should grip on the dust cap. Repeat the procedure until it goes back into its original shape.

Step 4: Using a Marker to Hide the Tiny Holes

Use a marker that matches the color of your dust cap. Shade it until you are done.

Step 5: You're Done!

Your done! You're speaker should look like the picture below.

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    67 Discussions

    0
    Jazzajon
    Jazzajon

    8 years ago on Introduction

    No No No No! Making holes in the speaker cone is not what you want to do. It will compromise the strength of the speaker material and one slip means you could tear it. Use a vacuum cleaner on low power to suck out the dent. If your vacuum cleaner only has one setting, try attaching a a toilet paper inner cardboard tube to the end of your vacuum hose. Then make a few holes in the card board sides to reduce the power of the suction. Other wise stick some sellotape to the cone and pull it off and out will come the dent.

    0
    bkv951
    bkv951

    Reply 1 year ago

    The holes are not in the speaker cone; they are in the dust cap (voice-coil cover) which is, typically, merely glued to the speaker done. These tiny holes will not affect speaker performance but the results of this procedure will greatly enhance the appearance of the speaker even under grill cloth.

    This project should be attempted with caution on aluminum voice coil covers. The needles should be very, very pointed so as to minimize the pressure required to push the needle through the cap. Silver paint or nail polish will cover those holes very well and again no loss of sound integrity but huge increase in aesthetics and resale value. Props to the original poster of this Instructable......very helpful.

    0
    ASCAS
    ASCAS

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    try to look for audiophile speakers, like bowers and wilkins, PSB. Their dust caps are in a shape of a bullet, you will notice that the bullet is not attached to the cone but in the magnet, thus leaving a c
    gap from the cone to the coil.

    0
    poikilotherm
    poikilotherm

    8 years ago on Introduction

    This is such a great idea! I don't see why everyone hates it so much. Just cover the hole with glue, and the dust will stay out and the hole will not get larger.

    0
    beehard44
    beehard44

    8 years ago on Introduction

    nice idea with the black marker!
    unrelated question: where did you get the speaker?

    0
    ASCAS
    ASCAS

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    I know that you live in the Philippines, I am a Filipino too! You can buy one in raon, or in deeco muntinlupa. It is a 50W Crown Woofer that costs P250/ pc.

    0
    ASCAS
    ASCAS

    8 years ago on Introduction

    Let's face it, you do not need electricity to fix the den't, unlike the vacuum.

    I am really surprised that most people don't give a rip about your method and say, "USE A VACUUM, GOSHHH." I personally think that having a bent pin like this around allows you to pretty much immediatly fix the problem.

    I thought the Instructables community would be a little more accepting, but after reading comments like,

    "DONT DO THIS"

    I'm really not sure anymore. Good 'ible besides.

    0
    itsmanofpopsicle
    itsmanofpopsicle

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Oh, and one more question : If it gets dented again, is it a really bad idea to try to re-use your holes again?

    0
    ASCAS
    ASCAS

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Reusing the hole is fine, that's the beauty of it, you only need to use 1 hole.

    0
    emerson.john
    emerson.john

    8 years ago on Introduction

    I have used the needle, tape, and vacume cleaner trick to repair dustcaps professionally. When using a needle I always sealed the tiny hole with wood glue - not because the hole will enlarge, it will not - to keep dust out of the voice coil gap. That is why they put the cap on it in the first place. I prefer the needle method.

    If you need to replace the cap, replacements are available. Here is a source Google just returned: http://www.speakerworks.com/dust_caps_s/66.htm .

    0
    zenderon
    zenderon

    8 years ago on Introduction

    that's good and inventive
    like it
    but try a vac......
    looking at the comments
    that's what was on my mind
    just suck the thing out
    no holes no repairs

    0
    bkv951
    bkv951

    1 year ago

    Great simple fix. Your dust covers appear to be rubberized whereas mine were merely heavy paper. Your technique worked exactly for my Fender Acousta-sonic 10" speaker dust cover as it did for yours. Don't be distraught about nay-sayers; it was you who had the courage to post and THANK YOU very much. I regret not having taken any before/ after pix, but I got so pumped, I jumped right into the project and was finished in less than 5 minutes. I sealed the holes with clear nail polish and used the marker as well. You are appreciated.

    0
    mrmetallica
    mrmetallica

    4 years ago on Introduction

    i had this problem today with a tweeter and a light went on in my head.i got a piece of pipe bigger then the cover and sucked and it popped out easy.do not make holes in them.

    0
    SGT. Desert
    SGT. Desert

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Nice tanks but my stupid neighbor used a knife N has cut a hole in my gigantic speaker and its sound it dose not have any noise any more :( aghhhh . know how to fix that ?

    0
    Yonatan24
    Yonatan24

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    He probably ruined the speaker... Time to buy a new one...

    0
    JCC5
    JCC5

    4 years ago

    Lets see.. the simplest way to repair that dent is to cut a pet bottle fitting the size of your speaker. Then using your mouth to sip it in.

    0
    PhillipM2
    PhillipM2

    5 years ago on Introduction

    USE A VACUM CLEANER!! TAKE THE VACUM CLEANER HOSE AND PLACE IT CLOSE TO THE DUST CAP WHEN VACUM IS RUNNING, IT WILL SUCK IT OUT EASILY WITHOUT ANY DAMAGE!