Repair Your Electronics

Intro: Repair Your Electronics

Capacitors and cold or loose solder joints are the most common failure.

Step 1: Caution

Beware of high voltage. Capacitors store energy. They store energy even when the power is removed. Always remove your device from power and discharge capacitors using a resistance probe. Proceed at your own risk!

Step 2: Disassemble

Take your time. Do not rush. Remove the obvious screws and look for hidden screws behind rubber feet, under stickers. Most gadgets are screwed and snapped together. A little wiggle and pressure will unsnap. Separate parts into layers and keep track of the screws.

Step 3: Examing and Repair

In the case below you will see the capacitors are bulging. They are failing capacitors. The 15 volt cap even whistles. After replacing the power worked and this monitor is salvaged with a 1$ part from Radio Shack.

Be sure to replace your capacitors with the same farad rating as the old cap. You can replace with a different voltage as long as the new cap is rated for a equal or higher voltage rating.

Step 4: Guide

Here is a guide i found online for more detail. Thanks!

http://www.antiqueradio.org/recap.htm

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    12 Discussions

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    wolfgang64

    5 years ago on Introduction

    Can you discharge a cap by shorting it pole to pole while it is still on the board?

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    Luneratechnosasquatch

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    you can safely use a larger voltage value, but it is best to use the same. Matching type and polarity is EXTREMELY important. I got my first flat screen monitor this way, had a board full of bad capacitors. It cost $17 to replace them all, of course when you're buying the top of the line caps that's what you pay.

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    omnibotLunera

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    This wouldn't happen to have been a Viewsonic vx922 perchance? That's how I got mine to. I was soo impressed with myself after that.

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    omnibotzack247

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Well well, that looks a lot like the model FP71G+ i recovered from the bins a week ago.

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    zack247omnibot

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    yeah, i have one of those too...

    btw, i fixed the motherboard i mentioned VV works as good as new!

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    omnibotzack247

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Yer, turned out I couldn't rescue that benq-monitor but on the plus side I now have a lot of really cool high voltage components :D

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    omnibotzack247

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Congratulations! Doesn't it just feel great when you do something like that? I can walk around for days amazed at myself.
    Speaking of which I made a converter from 4,5v to 322v today. I feel fantastic :)

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    zack247omnibot

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    im going to attempt to repair a pc motherboard with 11 failing cps on it, one of them leaked some of the orangy stuff, thank god it didn't get on anything