Restoring Old Soviet Hand Drill

9,831

54

32

Introduction: Restoring Old Soviet Hand Drill

I bought this drill for 50UAH (about $2) on a flea market. It's an old soviet made hand drill...

So I restored it...

Teacher Notes

Teachers! Did you use this instructable in your classroom?
Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson.

Step 1:

Wanna see how?

Step 2:

I took the handle off first. Cause it was easy.

Step 3:

Then I took the chuck off. It had a lot going on inside... but I endured everything.

Step 4:

Then things went a bit more complicated since in order to disassembly the rest of the thing I had to removethose two particular pins and I had nothing suitable to apply to this situation. So I took a broken drill bit and grinded it into a tool of perfect configuration to do the job.

I took everything apart.

Step 5:

I degreaced all parts using acetone.

And a tooth brush.

Step 6:

Paintstripper helped me to strip some paint.

Step 7:

And a wire brush helped me to remove all the junk from the details.

Step 8:

And even smaller wire brush helped me to remove the junk even further... in places iconceivable for such large and clumsy brush as previous one.

Step 9:

The long handle (that's how I decided to call it) was sanded down to a nice condition...

Step 10:

And that thing that was holding... THE SMALL HANDLE captured in its ever rotating purgatory... was comromised by the means of angle grinder to relese the little wooden thing.

Step 11:

The little wooden thing was sanded down then.

Step 12:

I used felt buffing wheel with some chrome oxide polishing paste to buff the parts I wanted to get buffed, and you can see how the drill would looked like would I haven't proceed further with painting. I was kind of cool, and I kind of regreat a bit that I just didn't gave it a clear coat at that point. But I wanted to restore the thing to its initial look, like for authenticity... kind of.

Step 13:

Anyway, as a next step I prepared the parts I had to paint by masking all the bits I didn't want to paint.

Step 14:

And I cleaned everything with acetone later to remove all the greace from handeling.

Step 15:

FIrstly I used a couple of coats of primer.

Step 16:

And then I painted parts black and red... just the way they were designed by some particular soviet engineer whose name is a complete mistery for everyone.

Step 17:

The handles (both the long one and the little wooden one) were treated with a couple of coats of linseed oil of aproximatelly the same time period of production (it still works).

Step 18:

I'm too lazy to explain this...

Step 19:

And the chuck was reassembled.

Step 20:

To e honest it took me more than a year to finish this projects. It sometimes happens, and I elieve a good portion of you can understand that this happens... I'm not so hopefull about the humanity and myself mostly as to about understand WHY this happens... but who cares, I finished it eventually... and it looks good...

But the last page of this instructable is the next one...

Step 21:

so this is it for now, thank you for your attention, and have a nice restoration!

Fix It Contest

Second Prize in the
Fix It Contest

Be the First to Share

    Recommendations

    • Cardboard Speed Challenge

      Cardboard Speed Challenge
    • Sculpting Challenge

      Sculpting Challenge
    • 3D Printed Contest

      3D Printed Contest

    32 Discussions

    0
    Waldemar Sha
    Waldemar Sha

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Thanks!

    0
    MaryS249
    MaryS249

    6 weeks ago

    I truly love this. I had an old hand drill like this for years that did amazing work. It is great to see this restored so beautifully.

    0
    Waldemar Sha
    Waldemar Sha

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Thank you.

    1
    snowf7
    snowf7

    6 weeks ago

    In an age where most people throw things away and replace them with newer versions, it is nice to see that there are some people who have respect for quality craftsmanship. This was a great post. I enjoyed all the pictures. You have my vote. Good luck.

    0
    equipoisebob
    equipoisebob

    2 months ago

    Nice job. Its a dead ringer for the UK manufactured Stanley Model 803. Its a really usful tool, very controllable and able to get into places that a larger power tool has no chance of getting.

    0
    Alfetta159
    Alfetta159

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Or is the Stanley Model 803 a dead ringer of this people's model? :-)

    0
    equipoisebob
    equipoisebob

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    'You pays your money and your takes choice' on that one!

    0
    gmcdavid
    gmcdavid

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Also looks a lot like an American Millers Falls No. 77, which I continue to find useful.

    0
    Waldemar Sha
    Waldemar Sha

    Reply 2 months ago

    I have a couple of those now... it's just something pleasant about rotating that handle I guess :)

    0
    I MP
    I MP

    6 weeks ago

    As an aside I was taught to call these drills Yankee drills while some refer to them as eggbeater drills for obvious reasons. I have two of these of different sizes both of unknown to me provenance. Since I am primarily a hand tool woodworker (joiner) I reach for them frequently for small drilling needs. I additionion I use my brace and bits for most other drilling jobs. The control you have with these tools is greater than the powered alternatives.

    0
    banman11
    banman11

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    I have one that is almost identical . The only difference is that the main wooden handle has a screw cap which one can put drill bits into.. I think it's a Stanley...

    0
    Graham4184
    Graham4184

    6 weeks ago on Step 21

    Really goid to see a restoration like this. Thank you for sharing. I am now inspired to restore some of my very old tools.

    0
    Jim28
    Jim28

    6 weeks ago

    Great restoration. I have a small one that I keep in the house. Beats unwinding extension cords for simple indoor tasks.

    0
    JohnH973
    JohnH973

    6 weeks ago

    I also like to bring old tools back to new-ish condition. I'm somewhat wary of this type of hand drill, as I have never handled one yet that didn't trap my skin between the crown wheel and the pinion. For the same reason I avoid little yappy dogs.

    0
    victorvector
    victorvector

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Leather glove John.

    0
    Waldemar Sha
    Waldemar Sha

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    I have another drill of the tsame type for a few years now and I've never experienced any troubles with it anyway, but maybe it's just I have a habit of rolling my sleaves up at any acassion. Still... with this one you can stop before it ripps your fingers off, so... there's an advantage...

    1
    RicardoF65
    RicardoF65

    6 weeks ago

    Great restoration, man. Congratulations! I have one just like yours, but mine is still in perfect work conditions. It’s my first choice to drill the holes for side dots in my guitars, because offers much more control that a electric drill, in my opinion.
    I’m the same kind of guy in the sense that I really like to know how things work, exactly. Restorations are excellent opportunities to learn that. I own a 80’s german-made double neck pedal steel guitar here just waiting to be fully disassembled and restored, when I finally could find enough courage to face the challenge.

    0
    victorvector
    victorvector

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    I hope you gather enough courage to tackle that job Ricardo , it`s one not to take lightly.
    Good luck with it , well worth while , and you will be proud of your work.
    Instrument making and restoration is highly challenging , and equally rewarding.