Seedling Canoe

Introduction: Seedling Canoe

Starting a garden can be easier than most people believe! Many people just need something to start it off in. Here it is! Simple, reusable, family fun to start a healthy summer off!

I hear it all the time, I'm too busy to garden or I don't have money to buy supplies. Myself, I like to reuse and save a little money. I needed something to start my seedlings in this spring, but didn't want to spend a bunch of money on a starter green house.

In result, I made these little guys one day and thought I'd share! :)

All you need :

*Two Smart Water bottles; or any 'taller-than-normal' bottles.
*Box cutter
*Dirt
*Seeds of choice
*Sissors
*Sharpie - Optional
*Posted Note - Optional

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Step 1: Cutting the Canoe

Once you got all the supplies, just take the box cutter and cut a oval down one side of the bottle.

You could get creative with the outside design, or have a child paint one. :)

*Keep cut out* If you will want to make little signs for marking canoes. (Pictured)
I just cut the cut out oval, down to a point and wrote on it with sharpie. I than added a posted note on the back, so you can read the sharpie clearly.

Step 2: Planting

Now it's time to add soil and seeds!
You can use any potting soil, if you don't have access to any; any dirt is usable too. I got all my seeds at the dollar store!

Fill bottle 1/2-3/4 the way up, use a toothpick or your finger, to make wholes in the soil. Place seeds in soil, cover seeds and water soil completely.
*Plant a inch or two apart*
Remember, you'll be transplanting these!

-If you want just sprouts to eat; You can place many seeds down, without spacing them out in the canoe-

Place in sunny window sill or under a LED light, if you have one.

Step 3: Sprouts!

The waiting game is sometimes dreadful but they will come up in the next week or so! :)

Depending on your sprouts, you can leave them in there for a while. After your plants get too big for them, you can easily transplant them in larger bottles or into the ground, due to your plant's recommendations.

Remember to keep moist!

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    3 Discussions

    0
    JulianAzz
    JulianAzz

    4 years ago

    Great simple instructable!

    0
    DIY Hacks and How Tos

    Great idea. This lets you get plant multiple seedlings in a single plastic bottle.

    0
    ChelseyJ1
    ChelseyJ1

    Reply 4 years ago

    Yes! I started many before transplanting. It's also good for placing outside, because you don't have to worry about the wind blowing them over. -Specially when they grow taller.