Sticky Lemon Syrup Cake

15,330

268

26

Warning - this cake is seriously addictive!

for more delicious recipes check out my blog www.artsyteenblog.wordpress.com

Step 1: Ingredients

for the cake

150g / 3/4 cup granulated / caster sugar

175g/ 3/4 cup butter (softened)

175g/ 1 1/2 cup self raising flour (sifted)

3 eggs

1 tsp vanilla essence

juice and zest of 1 lemon

for the syrup

1 cup caster sugar

juice and zest of 2 lemons

1/2 cup water

Step 2: Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180'C (375'F) and line a 5 x 9 inch rectangular baking tin with parchment paper .
  2. In a large bowl, combine sugar and butter.
  3. Add eggs and flour. Mix well.
  4. Stir in vanilla extract, lemon zest and lemon juice.
  5. Empty mixture into tin and bake for 35-40 minutes.
  6. While your cake is baking, make the lemon syrup. Heat sugar, lemon juice, zest and water over a low heat until the sugar has completely dissolved (about 10 minutes).
  7. When the cake is ready, remove from oven. Using a fork or skewer, poke holes all over the cake (this helps the cake absorb the syrup).
  8. Pour syrup over cake and leave to cool.

Step 3: Enjoy!

for more delicious recipes check out my blog www.artsyteenblog.wordpress.com

Share

    Recommendations

    • Make it Glow Contest 2018

      Make it Glow Contest 2018
    • Big and Small Contest

      Big and Small Contest
    • Baking Challenge

      Baking Challenge

    26 Discussions

    0
    None
    T0BY

    2 years ago

    This looks amazing!

    0
    None
    LucilleArtist

    2 years ago

    Caster sugar is just confectioners sugar or powdered sugar by another name. When I run out, I just put my granular sugar through my coffee grinder (clean it well first) to make the sugar powdery.

    4 replies
    0
    None
    --ak--LucilleArtist

    Reply 2 years ago

    Actually, Caster Sugar is a finer version of standard Granulated Sugar, but not so fine that it can be classed as Powdered Sugar. It is right inbetween. The benefit is that it gets more evenly distribute through the batter than granulated, and powdered sugar is more expensive and unnecessary for use in batter. In the UK, caster sugar is a standard we use for baking.

    0
    None
    nursermk--ak--

    Reply 2 years ago

    I buy a "Baker's Sugar" at the local supermarket which would qualify as it is a very finely ground granulated sugar but still looks like sugar and is not powdered.

    0
    None
    crogers357LucilleArtist

    Reply 2 years ago

    Not really. Confectioner's sugar is finely ground granulated sugar mixed with corn starch. Caster sugar is granulated sugar, but more finely ground.
    A coffee grinder or food processor will break the sugar down into finer particles.

    0
    None
    dragon fllyerLucilleArtist

    Reply 2 years ago

    Caster sugar is very fine granulated sugar, not confectioners'/powdered sugar. I think caster sugar is the British term for it; where I live it's sold as 'berry sugar'. (And powdered sugar is sold as 'icing sugar'...) Berry sugar is relatively expensive, so I mostly make it by grinding regular granulated sugar in my small food processor. I use it for baking quite a bit; it produces finer grained cookies than regular granulated sugar, but not a pasty texture as can happen sometimes with icing sugar.

    0
    None
    SonyaF3

    2 years ago

    The following measurements are confusing me.

    175g/ 3/4 cup butter (softened)

    175g/ 1 1/2 self raising flour (sifted)

    How can 175g be both 3/4 cup and also 1 1/2 cup? Is there an error?

    2 replies
    0
    None
    ArtsyTeenSonyaF3

    Reply 2 years ago

    Hi, there is no error. Flour is lighter than butter and therefore 3/4 cup of butter weighs 175g while 1 1/2 cup of self raising flour also weighs 175g.

    0
    None
    ArtsyTeenSonyaF3

    Reply 2 years ago

    Hi, there is no error. Flour is lighter than butter and therefore 3/4 cup of butter weighs 175g while 1 1/2 cup of self raising flour also weighs 175g.

    0
    None
    janthom

    2 years ago

    Mmm, don't think so; it's more of a finely ground granulated sugar. You can substitute the U.S.'s granulated (table) sugar, but not powdered.

    0
    None
    ArtsyTeen

    2 years ago

    Thank you all for your comments! I've been receiving a lot of questions concerning the "caster sugar" in this recipe (apologies to Americans, I didn't realise this was a british/irish term). Just to clear things up, you can substitute caster sugar with granulated sugar and it will not effect your cake!

    1 reply
    0
    None
    crogers357ArtsyTeen

    Reply 2 years ago

    We also know "vanilla essence" as "vanilla extract", or as most recipes call it "pure vanilla extract". I can't help but think what would happen if you used "impure vanilla extract"! ;)

    0
    None
    ArtsyTeen

    2 years ago

    Thank you all for your comments! I've been receiving a lot of questions concerning the "caster sugar" in this recipe (apologies to Americans, I didn't realise this was a british/irish term). Just to clear things up, you can substitute caster sugar with granulated sugar and it will not effect your cake!

    0
    None
    M. DwayneS

    2 years ago

    Oh my. My stomach is grumbling just looking at the pictures.

    Nice recipe!

    1 reply
    0
    None
    lovethebackwoods

    2 years ago

    Is the cake soggy, almost like a thick pudding cake, or is it more just pleasantly moist?

    1 reply
    0
    None
    ArtsyTeenlovethebackwoods

    Reply 2 years ago

    The cake itself is a light lemon sponge. Adding the syrup gives it a sticky, moist texture, but it's not soggy!

    0
    None
    crogers357

    2 years ago

    Of most interest to me is the use of "self-raising" flour.

    Note to Americans... it is NOT the same as "self-rising" flour. According to America's Test Kitchen,

    "self-raising flour is made by adding 2 teaspoons of baking powder to each cup of all-purpose flour."

    That works out to about 9 grams baking powder per 125 grams of all-purpose flour.

    Self-rising flour doesn't give the same lift. Substitute with care.

    1 reply
    0
    None
    xxlauraxxcrogers357

    Reply 2 years ago

    Oh, that is interesting. I probably would have substituted without even questioning it.

    0
    None
    Bamarobin

    2 years ago

    FYI commercial powdered sugar also contains a minimal amount of corn starch to deter clumping...