Storage Evolution

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Introduction: Storage Evolution

Check out my video. It was a really cool project for me. I was instired by this T-Shirt https://www.getdigital.de/Speicherevolution.html. (You also can find the t-shirt in the project as an image). So I thought why shouldn't I build this thing in real life with real objects. I hope you enjoy this Instractable and have fun to build it. Let me know in the comments what you think or if you have any questions? Thank you for reading.

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Step 1: Watch the Video

Step 2: Look Which Component You Want to Get!

I used the t-shirt as a refernece so I only used the components from the t-shirt, but you also can use a cd or a dvd. I think you can find every component pretty easy besides the floppy disk and the flex disk. For me it was easy to find this componets because my school wanted to throw them away ;)

flex disk

floppy disk

Step 3: 3D Print the Last Part

If you want to use the cloud symbol the use the stl file I provide. Or go to my thingiverse profile and downlaod the file there.

Thingiverse

MyMiniFactory

Step 4: Cut the Paper Template

You have to cut a paper template with holes of the size from your compontes. The complete size should be the size of the wood plate you use. Take tape and glue the template to the wood. This is for a perfect alignemt.

Step 5: Glue the Componts Onto the Wood

Now heat the hot glue and glue the components at their place onto the wood. You can also use a diferenet glue but hot glue worked perfect.

Step 6: Drill the Hock In

The last step we do. Gimlet a small hole with a small drill and after that you can drill the hocks in. We gimleted the holes before, that the wood won't break. Now take a string with the perfect length for you. Now you can put this pice of art on your wall.

Step 7: Conclusion

So for me this projct was really funny and I learned some insterresting things about wood working. Maybe you also learned or will learn something. Thank you for reading my instruction.

YouTube

Thingiverse

MyMiniFactory

Twitch

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    39 Discussions

    0
    WayneInGranby
    WayneInGranby

    15 days ago

    Nice. It's all from the prospect of whom is building this project and what they can get their hands on to be included. I built my first computer that had no data storage. When it was shut off everything was gone. My Commodore 64 had the standard cassettes for storage and then I up graded to a 10MB hard drive. I also remember the IBM 8" floppies at work.

    As a side note, I'm still running a 286 computer with DOS 6.2 daily that drives an engraving machine. A 486 computer running OS/2 3.0 Warp with up to 10 virtual DOS windows running AutoCAD 10. I have computers running specific machines that need Win95 for the Laser, Win 98 for the Vinyl Cutter, Win XP as a file transfer for the older machines to the new ones, Win 10.1 is my current desk top machine and Linux is our server.

    0
    gen81465
    gen81465

    Reply 13 days ago

    The Commodore 64 also had a cartridge slot.

    0
    WayneInGranby
    WayneInGranby

    Reply 12 days ago

    My Commodore 64 came with a cassette drive included for ~$500.00 which was too slow so my father paid for the 5 1/4 floppy drive and then later we upgraded to a 10 MB had drive.

    0
    .F
    .F

    Reply 14 days ago

    disk spindle!

    2
    caitd3
    caitd3

    15 days ago on Introduction

    Love your idea, but you forgot the first storage system I ever had...a cassette tape. I had a Timex computer, and they used a cassette tape and a regular cassette recorder to save programs and data. Not sure how much memory the system had at the time it was only 8 or 16 K...that's right K, at the time. It was tiny too My tablet is almost bigger. It required a TV set for a monitor at first too. You had to program it yourself and it only worked in basic. Those were the days........Today, anything less than 1T is small.

    0
    GoodWinApps
    GoodWinApps

    Reply 14 days ago

    I bought my first Timex/Sinclair when the memory jumped from 1K to 2K, it came pre-assembled, became available in the US, and the price dropped from $300 to $100.

    0
    caitd3
    caitd3

    Reply 14 days ago


    Wow, That sure brings back memories.While that $300 and $100 doesn't sound like a lot today, back then it was a lot of money. I finally moved up to an Apple IIC, and then switched to Windows when Apple kept upgrading to new computers and did not support the older versions. Software was harder to find for the Apple too.

    0
    GaleW1
    GaleW1

    14 days ago

    The first "home" computers used cassette tape for storage.

    0
    Gesina11
    Gesina11

    14 days ago

    The first one is missing, an 8 inch floppy

    0
    GoodWinApps
    GoodWinApps

    14 days ago

    I've been planning to make a very similar display, 8" floppy, 5.25" floppy, 3.5" floppy, 2" floppy (from a Zenith portable...,) CF memory, SD, and microSD. I also want to show the storage capacity, speed,and price, and how greatly the first two have increased while the price and physical size have shrunk. ( I have an ad clipped from a 1983 magazine announcing a fantastic deal: "11 megabytes of hard drive and 64 kilobytes of fast RAM in a Z80A computer for under $10K. Two floppy drives, too...." It would be fun to do the same thing with music storage devices too.

    0
    maxhuey
    maxhuey

    Reply 14 days ago

    hum....

    20200206_151517(1)_2.jpg
    0
    riff raff
    riff raff

    14 days ago

    Alas, no punched paper tape, no punched cards, no 8" Shugart floppy disks, etc. Tsk, tsk. ;-)

    0
    maxhuey
    maxhuey

    Reply 14 days ago

    like this?

    20200206_151517(1)_2.jpg20200206_151528(1)_2.jpg
    0
    RaymondR6
    RaymondR6

    Reply 14 days ago

    I had a Data General Nova 2 minicomputer that loaded its software in a green paper tape format. It took hours to read in those tapes in order and load to its 16 KB magnetic core memory (I have that memory board), then boot up the machine. We later replaced those paper tapes and the reader with a 9-track tape reel unit.

    1
    crbartman
    crbartman

    14 days ago on Introduction

    You forgot the 8 inch floppies. They sure were an upgrade from punch cards!

    0
    maxhuey
    maxhuey

    Reply 14 days ago

    how about...

    20191015_215139_HDR-1_2.jpg
    0
    RaymondR6
    RaymondR6

    14 days ago

    The first rotary storage device was a magnetic drum. Then IBM invented the magnetic disk using 30-inch platters, later dropping to 14-inch. The 8-inch hard drive was developed, then the 5 1/4 inch hard drive, then the 3 1/2 inch, and now the 2 1/2 inch. Casio developed a one-inch hard drive for its cameras (I have one) which held 20 MB but was a financial failure.

    There were removable hard drives, too. IBM began with the Model 2311 hard drive that held six 14-inch platters in a removable spindle (but only held 10 MB), and later grew to eleven 14-inch platters in the Model 3330. I saw a single 14-inch platter drive, too, which looked like a pizza in a plastic box. My first computer, the IBM 1102, which I used to learn FORTRAN in 1972, had one of these.

    As for floppy disk (originally called the flexible disk), we all know that Alan Shugart, working at IBM, developed the first 8-inch floppy as a boot device for the IBM System/370 mainframes (I worked with that system and use that device in the 1970s), then as a input device to replace the 80-column punched card. The next size was the 5 1/4 inch floppy which had several densities, from 160 KB to 320 KB (8 sectors per track) and later 360 KB.(9 sectors per track). The 3 1/2 inch arrived in a hard case which had several densities, beginning with 1 MB unformatted (720 KB formatted), 2 MB (1.44 MB formatted), and 4 MB (2.88 formatted). This last one was an unique size that only IBM supported on its ThinkPad laptops (I have several). The smallest floppy was the Zenith 2-inch floppy (I have several) that was only usable in its laptop.

    Later other sizes and formats arrived as competition. The first was the Zip Drive, then the Super Disk that held 120 MB in a 3 1/2 inch format (I have these two). Sony had an magnetic audio disk format that only its players could use.

    I didn't mention the compact disk because it was create for audio, yet it is useful as permanent storage (the data is recorded as physical tracks) and the medium is very cheap. There are rewriteable CD and even rewiteable DVD units, but for computer storage they are very slow, even slower than floppies!. Magnetic media is still the best for long term data and for other needs such as audio and video. They can last for many decades if stored and protected correctly.

    Now we can all use solid state memory as removable storage, but now available as internal storage in Chromebooks, tablets, smartphones, and newer laptops. Texas Instruments developed a solid state memory called "bubble memory" that held magnetic bubbles in a special material, and was accessed in a serial format, such that one had to read all of one track, store it in RAM, than write in RAM, and store the track (rewrite) in the bubble memory. Some of that bubble memory is still in orbit inside old satellites.

    0
    Bloodbeard
    Bloodbeard

    14 days ago

    I get that this is a limited selection, but you really need Zip discs on there at the very least (they were extremely impactful to the working world). Also, Compact Flash came before flash drives and SD, and really started the portable device removeable-storage revolution.