THE GAUSSIAN RIFFLE

About: im just a kid on my way to get myself killed by what i do,

The electromagnetic riffle is a weaponry designed to fire ferrous projectiles with the help of high voltage currents discharged from a capacitor bank. It is a simple riffle designed to reduce the complexity and cost of bullets . The riffle is based on the concepts of electromagnetic levitation and magnetic propulsion techniques, the basic idea is that when a solenoid is magnetised, its core has the tendency to pull any iron projectile in to its core
If the current to the coil is stopped before the projectile reaches the core then the projectile travels with the same high velocity in the same direction it was pulled towards its core

Step 1: You Will NeEd

To construct this riffle you will need a 25 cm long pvc pipe, 0.5guage magnet wire, a switch ,a rectifier (4 diodes) and lots of capacitors(higher the capacitance higher will be the power )

Step 2: The Cannon

Attach the disks as shown in the picture and wind the coil over the pvc tube between the disks as shown adding a connector may do great help. THe disk helps to converge the energy where its required , it optional.

Step 3: THE STAND

Having a stand like this (made out of foam) to make the riffle nice and sturdy is essential .it gives it a look and keeps the riffle pointed always, (ts optional ). The riffle is now constructed . we have to design a capacitor bank to fire it.

Step 4: THE CAPACITOR BANK

I have used a 500 mfd capasittor for this .I get a potential of 470 volts when my capacitors are compleatly charged. the discharge from this bank is used to fire the projectile.Itis discharged with the help of a switch (10amps 450 volt). the current lasts only for split seconds .and hence there is no need for high speed switch or relays to supply the required power to the riffle


Step 5: THE CAPACITOR CHARGING UNIT

I have used a bridge rectifier to charge my capacitor bank. it has four diodes in a loop the output from this rectifier is pulsating. but it is perfect for the capacitors

Step 6: THE SET-UP

THE FINAL SET-UP LOOKS AS SHOWN IN THE PICTURE now the riffle is ready to use. remember we need the discharge from the capacitors not the main source to power our coil so switch off the mains when the capacitors are charged and then press the fire button.


Step 7: Projectiles

the riffle can fire any ferrous projectile , it can also fire ball bearings

Step 8: SEE IT IN ACTION

THOUGH THE POWER FROM IT MIGHT SOUND INSIGNIFICANT BELIVE IT OR NOT I GET SPEEDS UP TO 2M/SEC IN MY PROJECT AND IT IS CAPEABLE OF OBTAINING UP TO 350 FEETS PER SECOND IN MODELS HAVING 20000 MFD CAPACITANCE

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    80 Discussions

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    vedant

    6 years ago on Step 4

    Isnt it 500 MFD a lot ? is it safe to use a capacitor with such a high MFD ?

    I'd also like to add that magnet wire is important because the insulating enamel is very thin which allows more wire to be wrapped in a small space increasing magnetic field strength. If you used standard plastic coated insulated wire, the coil would be larger and the magnetic field strength would be weaker.

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    qualiadaisy.darling20

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    the styrofoampeanut gave a good reply, as well as being covered in enamel, this wire is often highly pure colloidial copper without any oxides on it, as well as being covered in an air and current insulating enamel coating. this is so that it has a homogenous level of resistance (copper chemical compounds alter this) when used in coils to create electromagnetic fields, which are then used in electromechanical applications such as the coils of tattoo machines, solenoids, motors, stepper motors, dynamos, etc, as well as to make the coils of current changing transformers, tesla coils, and various other things.

    nicola tesla was a serbian chap that did alot to further the known applications of this material. look him up.

     foxtrot is wrong
    its officially called magnet wire, and its wire with a thin coat of enamel on it, like an insulator
    it has this so it can be wrapped in many coils without discharging electricity where the coils touch each other

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    blackfister

    7 years ago on Introduction

    First, very nice instructable.
    While looIking at it, I was thinking if it could be posible to make the projectile "vibrate", lets say to move back and forth, (not leaving the coil) inverting polarity of magnet? The idea would be to use the vibration of the projectile in the linear magnet to use its movemet as a machine, kind like a standard tattoo machine, sorry if it sounds ignorant, im not familiar with electromagnets. Any one knows if posible? If posible, could the movement (back and forth) be controlled, lenght of the movent? amount of vibrations? (lets say N amounts per seconds) and strength?
    Kind regards,
    B.

    9 replies
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    ALogan97blackfister

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    you could get it to move easily -- I'm not sure about how you would do it if it were inside of the coil, though -- by putting it inside of a tube with an electromagnet at both ends, and alternating the electromagnets' strength from weak to strong to cause it to move closer to the more powerful magnetic field and then reversing motion when the strength of the other magnetic field is changed to be more powerful than the opposing one. The speed would vary according to the difference in the two magnetic fields, and the distance traveled would vary by how long you left one magnetic more powerful than the other. Sorry if this is confusing, I can post a diagram if you want.

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    ALogan97blackfister

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    Ok, I made three diagrams showing different states of the electromagnets. The setup is the same in all of them so if you don't know what something is in the second or third, it's labeled in the first one.

    electromagnet diagram 1.jpgelectromagnet diagram 2.pngelectromagnet diagram 3.png

    A more efficient method would be to have a single, central coil which is offset wound, meaning one side is slightly larger, and connecting to high current AC in the frequency you want it to vibrate.

    Yeah, that would work, but wouldn't the vibration frequency change in different parts of the tube since the coil is offset?

    No because both sides would exert equal force in the opposite polarity. if it is in +/- and the right side is smaller, the left would pull with say, 5 newtons of force while in -/+ polarity the left side would push with 5 newtons of force.

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    blackfisterALogan97

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    thank you very much! its exactly what im trying to get done. Ill keep postings on the outcome.
    Thank you again for taking time on responding!
    :)

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    ALogan97blackfister

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    Oh, and the strength of the magnets can be changed depending on the amount of current going into it, so you could probably hook up one of those light dimmer switches or use an arduino to easily control the strengths of the magnets.

    Or gauss gun, or coilgun, or lenear electromagnetic accelerator, or mounted ferric projectile launcher, it really doesn't matter.

    Actually there is a difference between them. This is a coilgun, not a gauss rifle. A gauss rifle is where you have multiple chambers separated by magnets with two ferrous balls in each chamber, and the last chamber is open on one end which allows one the last ball to shoot out of the end when you drop another one in the opposite side. It doesn't have any electromagnets in it. A coilgun is where you have a coil wrapped around a tube with a small ferrous projectile that is shot out of the end of the tube by the electromagnetic field generated by the coil surrounding it. A linear electromagnetic accelerator (aka railgun) is where a ferrous projectile sitting on two metal rails is propelled forward by the electromagnetic field generated when the metal rails are charged with electricity. So it does actually matter what you call it.