The 10 Cent Mini-Survival Knife...v.2.x.....

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About: Carpenter, handyman, husband, dad, buddy...

If any of you are not familiar with M4040, you should check out his site....he's a survival expert and a master bladesmith...

This instructible is based on his 10 cent survival knife design....with a little pinache thrown in for good looks and function...

Step 1: Materials and Tools...

First, pick up some hacksaw blades at the local hardware store, and a chunk of hardwood from the scrap pile or at the lumber store....

You're gonna at least need a bench grinder or belt sander, and a rotary tool for fine work, if you want to make this job relatively easy....a few fine grit sandpapers will help hone your edges, too.....I like my blades to mow hair...

I used my trusty old grinder that I rigged up from an industrial vent motor when I was about knee-high (yeah, it's still my favorite, and I can't seem to break it), and my new Dremel Stylus, which kicks a**, a couple of cutting wheels, and various attachments.

I also recommend Loctite Super Glue and Loctite 5min 2-part epoxy for just about all multi-material adhesion, simply because it works, is sandable, toolable, and I happen to always have some on hand.

Step 2: Roughing It In...

I used a Stanley 24TPI hacksaw blade, which I snipped at 5 1/2" from the end to create my blank. I roughed the point w/the grinder and then chose a nice piece of golden oak from my scrap pile for the handle stock.

Step 3: Mocking Up....

Next, I cut my handle blank down to 3 1/2" and slotted it length-wise, from end-to-end with the table saw in order to accommodate the blade, which sits flush into the slot.

Step 4: Handle Layout...

Now I used one of my cutoff wheels to lay out the handle for finger contours....Like Grandpa always said..."Eyeballin's for rookies....the pros always have a map."

Step 5: Intermediate Shaping and Layout....

So I took the blade and the handle to the grinder and roughed-in the basic pattern that I wanted for my pieces. You'll also notice that I marked the blade at the point where I want it to sit in the handle, then held the blade outside of the handle and, using the line as a reference, was able to mark where I wanted to drill my stud hole in the handle later.

After drilling my stud hole, I grabbed a .22 shell, removed the slug and powder, used a torch to fire the primer, and proceeded to re-drill the hole with incrementally larger bits until my empty .22 casing fit very snugly through the assembly. Once I had a nice, tight fit, I removed the casing, applied some epoxy to the interior and rim of the hole in the handle, and reinserted the shell. Notice the opposite side has a bunch of extra shell....

Step 6: Setting the Hinge....

I waited about ten minutes for my epoxy to cure well, then I ground off all but about 1/8" of the extra brass.

Now you need a flaring tool....I used an old quick-chuck that no longer holds bits, and ground the end of it to a slight taper. Then I laid the assembly down on a hard surface, making sure that the opposite side of my brass had good backing, so that I wouldn't pop it out, and tapped my flaring tool into the shell until it shouldered well and tight against the hole in the handle.

Next I filled the shell with epoxy, making sure to get it in the shell, not just on top and around it. Make sure you use a little too much...it'll sand off later, and it's better than not enough. Put it aside and take a little break.

Step 7: Cleaning It Up...

Now I flat-sanded both sides of the handle w/the sanding wheel on my grinder - removing the excess epoxy from earlier....nice and smooth


After all was said-and-done, I polished the blade a bit, and gave the whole handle a good soak in some Minwax golden oak stain. Then I used some tool wax on the blade to preserve its surface from oxidation.

As you can see here, my knife measures out at exactly 6" long, the handle is 3/8" thick, and the profile is about 5/8" at its widest point. All-in-all, a fun build, and a useful blade......also pictured is another one I made, with a fixed blade, serrated back, and a lanyard...

Step 8: Helloo, Surprise....

But wait....there's more.....this blade ain't no ordinary pig-sticker....no, no, no.......
I thought it'd be a shame to waste all that good cutting length of a hacksaw blade, so I added a little something extra to this that you might not have caught..

Yep...that's right...a full 4 1/2" of hacksaw teeth when opened 180 degrees, and it's still pretty.

Step 9: An Addicting Hobby....

Since discovering M4040's 10 cent knife design, I've tinkered with it on and off for a few months, and seem to come up with a new variant every now and then...

I hope this, my third "instructible" inspires some more great ideas for this project....

As always, I must plug my website, www.htwtusa.com , and ask anyone who's interested to come check it out....it's free and friendly, so don't be shy....

Thanks again, 'Saw.

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    71 Discussions

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    Qwertyfish

    4 years ago

    Isn't it quite flexible?

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    Brantley Tinninhanelyp

    Reply 4 years ago

    actually as someone who has used a hacksaw extensively I can tell you they are actually used for wood, metal, or masonry. there are separate blades made for each application mentioned

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    doo da dohanelyp

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    If you are camping and in a fix,would work better than nothing, they do cut most anything. Happy camping!!

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    crwydryny

    5 years ago on Introduction

    I used to make these when I was in school all the time I actually think I still have one in my survival kit.

    I actually ground each one out using an old wetstone rather than a grinder and my handles were simply made of cardboard and tape (or some times just tape) but they did the job eventhough I used to make them mostly for fun they were quite handy at times when I didn't have my pocket knife or camping/hunting knife

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    spylock

    5 years ago on Introduction

    Ive made a couple out of old miter saws,theyre more rigid,and hold an edge pretty darn good.The only problem is being able to keep it after youve made it,as your friends will love em.

    I tried to make a hacksaw blade knife but it wouldn't hold an edge. My Dad told me it's because of what metal is used and how it's made.

    1 reply

    It's more of a grind but if you sharpen the saw edge that is induction hardened where the rest is just soft steel it will hold an edge better. Alternately heat red hot and quench. Clean a spot off the blade to bare bright steel. Then heat to about 325 in an oven and watch until that spot turns straw coloured. Turn oven off and allow to cool slowly. The steel is now hardened and tempered so it isn't brittle.

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    n0ukf

    6 years ago on Introduction

    Why are you removing the slug and powder from a live shell? It would be much safer to get a spent shell from someone. I'm sure they'd give you a few (or as many as you want for free since they can't be reloaded.

    Even with the bullet and powder removed, the primer is still live. Be careful!

    1 reply
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    HTWTUSAn0ukf

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    Ummm...you might wanna sit down for this...

    ...I'm a firearms expert. As such, I can assuredly say this: Removing a .22 slug, powder, and firing the primer with applied heat is so easy and safe, a 6 year old caveman can do it...in fact, it's a helluva lot safer than running out the door at 10PM to fire off a shot, just to recover a spent brass....xD

    P.S. You should read the entire article before commenting...I'm just sayin' :-)

    That knife looks awesome, i imagine people could use any blades to make these sawzall blades come in all sorts of shapes an sizes if someone needs a different blade edge or a thickier blade. I have hacksaw blades wrapped with tape,all over. They really come in handy for little jobs and dont take up much room in the tool box. A person might magnetize one of those blades to use as a compas or to make a compass. Good ible!

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    infob

    6 years ago on Introduction

    It is a good blade to do a peasant knife "https://www.instructables.com/id/My-First-Knife/"

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    Mr.1911

    7 years ago on Introduction

    This is instructables at it's finest!!!! Five stars by the way.

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    happybanana

    7 years ago on Introduction

    thank you very very much for your comment and your tip helped me to create this knife.my phsycic powers tell me that you are from canada?

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    happybanana

    7 years ago on Introduction

    could anyone tell me where to get cheap hacksaw blades in the uk because theyre £5 for a pack of two blades in B&Q and i don't have that kinda money

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    ninja of suburbia

    7 years ago on Step 9

    As a journeyman blacksmith and bladesmith I applaud you. This is very simple and easy to follow. Might I suggest you add some sort of wraparound plate on the back of the hilt so that the sawblade doesn't attack your hand?

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    tulekah

    7 years ago on Step 8

    i'm thinking skip the handle, just edge with half inch scotch tape and wrap with two layers of para-cord. stash them every where and you have a blade and saw you can hilt with cord or mount on a stick. a saw on an 8 foot pole has saved the day twice in my life.

    1 reply
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    HTWTUSAtulekah

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    Common sense, at last!...no matter how 'flimsy' they may seem...a sharp edge on a long pole is a hunting implement, a weapon, a fishing gig, a tool...you name it...and you can pack scores of these little, disposable edges EVERYWHERE!