The Lazy Carver

20,849

175

13

About: I made a beer mug with only a knife & a hatchet. I think that says a lot about me.

I designed this tool (in fact a bit to mount on a drill or a router) especially for kuksa carving, but I can imagine it can be a great help for anyone who wants to drill big smooth holes in wood.

All you need:
- drill
- angle cutter
- heavy duty clock drill
- piton or bolt
- a few screws
- a piece or carbon steel

Step 1: Cut It Out

Never throw anything! Years ago I found on a flee market an old machete, handforged and perfect to 'turn into something else one time': perfect for this project.

Clean it up, and drill a disc out of it with a clock drill. Don't forget to lubrificate while drilling.

Step 2: Pitonize

Cut a groove in the top of a heavy diameter bolt.
Insert the disc, drill two holes in both (side to side) & smash a few autoscrewing screws or pitons in it to uniform the whole.

Dirty but effective!

Step 3: Sharpen & Ready to Go!

Sharpen the edges - on the counterclockwiseside, of course - and mount the device on a router or column drill.

Power ON, highspeed & go!

NO NEED TO TELL THAT THIS DEVICE IS AS DANGEROUS AS HELL.
WEAR GLOVES & HOLD THE PIECE WITH BOTH HANDS, IT DOESN'T MAKE A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WOOD & MEAT.

Enjoy this tool.
Woodcarving will never be the same...

Share

    Recommendations

    • Big and Small Contest

      Big and Small Contest
    • Toys Contest

      Toys Contest
    • First Time Author

      First Time Author

    13 Discussions

    0
    None
    kbeedle

    4 years ago

    This is just what i need!!!!!!!! But i dont have a metal working tools..:/

    0
    None
    rimar2000Ninzerbean

    Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

    Nina, I was in holidays in Cuba for 2 weeks. Still I have not entered in my workshop after return.

    0
    None
    bricobartrimar2000

    Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

    Let's say that I tried to limit the risk: by making a sturdy tool, by fixing it the strong as I could in the drill and by holding the piece with both hands. Pressing it in a vicegrip would - in my case - have been unhandy because the diameter of the tool was much smaller than the hole I would carve. I needed to 'walse' the kuksa to carve it correctly.
    Believe me, handled intelligently this tool is safe.
    How could it be more safe? By drilling a bigger disc for the device, for example, with exactly the inner diam of the kuksa.
    Just an idea...