The Putty Peeler

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Introduction: The Putty Peeler

About: I made a beer mug with only a knife and a hatchet. I think that says a lot about me.

Never thought that a painter's delta knife would be traduced by 'putty knife' by google and that it turned out to be the right term. Weird sometimes, language!

So, all you need this time is this putty knife and a dremel or other speedcutting stuff.

To make what? To make a tool to survive in the gastronomic jungle: The Putty Peeler! Made in a few minutes, nice & effective: with this tool you can slice almost everything in regular chips without the loose of gallons of blood, fingers or whatever. It's the knife that strikes over the product, not vice versa. I picked the basic idea in a cheese factory in the mountains. The brains were not mine...

Wanne peel cucumber? You'll do it!
Wanna peel potatoes? You'l do it!
Wanna slice carrots? You'll do it!
Wanna make potato chips? Just do it!
Wanna reduce your stepmother in tiny slices? Go for it! (Maybe you should freeze her before, or try to have some conversation.)

I use it mostly to cut chips off concrete-hard mountain cheese. Full of flavour, delicious!

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Step 1: Cut Your Putty

Choose a putty knife, they exist in a large number of sizes and are used by painters to plaster walls etc.
Cut a U-section in the base of the delta, with the base of the U towards the handle.
Wear safety googles!

Step 2: Fold & Sharpen

Fold the inside of the U downwards with pliers. The angle depends on the thickness of the slices you want. Mine is something like 3mm (0.1 inch).
Fold the whole base of the knife upwards. This will permit you to slice more easy.
Sharpen with a dremel.

Step 3: Yumyum!

Well, enjoy it and thanx for whatching!

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    51 Discussions

    0
    holymoses
    holymoses

    4 years ago on Introduction

    I doubt this will work long enough to get really happy about it.

    But within a general task like "How to prepare your lunch at a construction site" it is an input!

    0
    RobTurrentine

    I like the idea about drilling holes to make a grater. I love melted cheese and still after 50 years of cheese grating experience I manage to scrape my knuckles. How about taking apart a grater and attaching a handle? Does anyone have a master solution to the cheese grating issue? It could change the world.

    0
    linny
    linny

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    "Does anyone have a master solution to the cheese grating issue? It could change the world," .
    Uh, just a thot: try freeeeezing your cheese at least slightly / for an hour before grating it. Please let me know how this turns out as you do not specify what cheese we are talking about..
    Thanks.

    linny.

    0
    RobTurrentine
    RobTurrentine

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    I like that idea but my main issue is when the piece of cheese gets small it is likely to slip. Ice cold cheese is slick. I've been using latex gloves and they help. I'm talking about cheddar, mozzarella, Monterrey jack, that kind of cheese. I'm thinking of some sort of holder for the cheese to keep my hands away from the cutting surface and I just haven't seen anything.

    I like the rotating device with the handle but it doesn't hold a lot and you have parts to clean where it's hard to get into the crevices. I've also heard that break easily.

    Thanks,

    Rob

    0
    bartworker
    bartworker

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    What about a giant homemade garlic pusher (or how is such thing called) to push the cheese into tiny worms? Or a hacked meat destroyer - you know such a tool used to make burgers.
    Just a few ideas... ;-)

    0
    Robibame
    Robibame

    5 years ago on Introduction

    wow, very simple, but mighty cool. I see me makin' one of these.

    0
    antioch
    antioch

    5 years ago on Introduction

    I like this one. It's high quality and sturdy, yet cheaper than commercial ones. And there is a greater variety of putty knife sizes available so you could make a giant cheese slicer for the fraction of the price of a commercial one.
    And in the end, what's the fun in buying something you can make yourself?

    0
    bartworker
    bartworker

    Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

    You hit that nail on the head my friend, go slice that cheese!

    0
    CescoAiel
    CescoAiel

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Nice and simple, but how does it differ from a normal handheld cheese slicer?

    0
    bartworker
    bartworker

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    Never saw a 'normal cheese slicer'! Do you mean something with a thin wire?
    I suppose the only difference is the origin, this one's a hack! ;-)

    0
    vitensenter
    vitensenter

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    The "normal" cheese slicer (ostehøvel) was invented and patented back in 1925 by the Norwegian carpenter Thor Bjørklund. It comes in many shapes, suitable to slice hard cheese or soft cheese, peel cucumbers, potatoes or carrots. All Norwegian homes have at least two different versions in their kitchen drawer. To see how the can look like, google "ostehøvel". You can buy it from Amazon or Ikea :)

    0
    dragonslug
    dragonslug

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    No, they would never sell their osterhovels they love cheese

    0
    vitensenter
    vitensenter

    7 years ago on Introduction

    The cheese slicer (ostehøvel) was invented and patented back in 1925 by the Norwegian carpenter Thor Bjørklund. It comes in many shapes, suitable to slice hard cheese or soft cheese, peel cucumbers, potatoes or carrots. All Norwegian homes have at least two different versions in their kitchen drawer. To see how the can look like, google "ostehøvel".

    0
    pposthoorn
    pposthoorn

    7 years ago on Step 3

    So basically this is a tutorial to make your own cheese cutter? :P (Or kaasschaaf as we call it in holland)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheese_knife#Cheese_slicer

    0
    bartworker
    bartworker

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    Yep! Waarom makkelijk doen als 't ook moeilijk kan? ;-)