The Wart Freezing Gun

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Introduction: The Wart Freezing Gun

Got warts? Dodge the hassle of a doctor's visit, the expense of over the counter remedies and freeze them off yourself! In minutes you can build a wart "freezing gun" from household items.

I made it easy for you, skip all this reading nonsense and watch the video-

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/726501/build_your_own_wart_remover

A doctor visit means sitting in the waiting room for a half hour and having to pay a hefty bill for something you could easily do yourself. Doctors use either
Liquid Nitrogen~ -320 F or
Dry Ice~ -110F
to remove warts.

We're going to use the liquid from dust remover cans which is anywhere between -25 and -160F

Before commenting, I know, I know there are many ways to remove your own warts. Duct tape, onions, vinegar, k'nex, banana peels, etc. But why do those when you can be awesome instead and do it like the pros?

On that note, if you've got any other original wart removing ideas, I'd love to hear them.

Step 1: Get the Materials-

You'll need-
One can of airduster/ spray dust/ dust off/ compressed air duster etc.
One plastic hollow Q-tip (or "cotton bud")
Scissors
A wart

If you don't have hollow q-tips, you can use the straw from the airduster, a square of toilet paper and a twist tie to improvise.

Step 2: Prepare the Q-tip Based Remover

This step is pretty simple-
1. Cut one end of the Q-tip off, leaving as much of the tube as possible.
2. Stick the cut end in the nozzle of the air duster.
2. Take a break.

Step 3: If You Don't Have a Hollow Q-tip...

If you couldn't find one of those Q-tips, you can still make it!

1. Get the red straw from the air duster, a piece of toilet paper and a twist tie.
2. Fold the toilet paper in half and push that over one end of the straw from the middle of the toilet paper.
3. Twist the toilet paper around the straw tightly so that the end is about the same shape and size as a Q-tip bud.
4. Wrap a twist tie around the toilet paper about 1/4" from the "bud" of the toilet paper. It should be firmly in place when you're done.
5. Insert the straw in the nozzle of the air duster as far as it will go.
6. Relax

Step 4: Practice and Preparation

Before trying to remove your wart, make sure you'll be able to do it properly.

Turn the can upside down and grip the trigger with your index finger. Pretend it's a gun and say "pow... POW" for some extra entertainment before continuing.

Now, very gently pull the trigger and practice holding it steady at a rate that won't drip freezing liquid everywhere. You want the liquid to evaporate just before it drips out.

If you can do that competently enough, you're ready to kill some warts.

This part is highly unnecessary, but it's good to be safe-
Clean the wart and surrounding area and also the Q-tip with some rubbing alcohol. Although many dusters are made from alcohols and gases that will naturally sanitize, it can't hurt to play it safe.

Step 5: Shoot That Freakin' Wart Already!

Now you'll have to muster your wits and remove that wart.

1. Using the same technique as before, start releasing the liquid at a very slow rate until you fell you've got it perfect.
2. Continue to squeeze at that rate and place the end of the Q-tip on the war so the straw is perpendicular to your skin in every direction.
3. Hold your wart remover there for about 20-30 seconds, the wart should turn white while you freeze it.

Note: I did mine for just over a minute because I've "removed" it at least 6 times, twice professionally and it keeps coming back.

4. After you've stopped, your wart should scab up in a few days and fall off. Don't forget to put neosporin on it to prevent scarring.

The pictures of my finger are from four days after removal. It looks pretty bad because I did it for over a minute and I didn't hold the can perpendicular to the wart. The wart is just now turning into a scab and about to fall off.

To the left of the wart, you can see a faint pinkish circle, that's a scar from a wart I successfully removed 3 weeks ago using this method. I forgot to put neosporin on that one.


Good Luck!

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    74 Discussions

    0
    dantaterdb
    dantaterdb

    1 year ago on Step 5

    Author gets props for proof of concept, but I found the application method to be messy and inaccurate, and ended up freezing too large of an area. Although I will say it didn't hurt nearly as much as I was expecting. If I try this again I think I'll try spraying it into a pre chilled coffee cup first and the using something like a qtip or chop stick or even a toothpick with the tip broken off to apply it. Be forewarned, the method above can't do an area smaller than about a pea.

    0
    LightSpeed1
    LightSpeed1

    12 years ago on Introduction

    Further tests: 1,1 difluoroethane went down to -65 F Chlorofluorocarbon went down to -67 F 1,1,1,2 Tetrafluoroethane went down to -68 F All in the same range. I tested my copper wire idea: the tissue paper acts like an insulator with air layers between multiple layers preventing the transfer of heat. I tried it without the paper and just sprayed the copper wire directly with the propellent and it cooled down well to at least -61 F. So skip the tissue on that one. I think this can be applied directly to a wart once it is cooled down with excellent control since no further spraying needs to go on during the application--just press the wire onto the skin target. I tried spraying the propellent directly on a freckle but the problem is control--the liquid comes out too fast and runs where you don't want it. The best method tried so far seems to be to cover the end of the straw with several layers of tissue to keep the outflow under control and applying the liquid directly to the skin. Note that the skin turns white with frost immediately, and dimples inward (shrinkage) until the skin warms again. Then it follows the normal process observed after liquid nitrogen application: turns pink, swells, and then local inflamation of tissue as the skin regenerates. I expect it will blister as well, if it continues to follow the pattern, followed by a scab which reveals new pink skin when it falls off. I also tried the concept of a reservoir filled with propellent with metal conducting the heat away, but it never got below -16 F. The use of brass instead of copper may account for some of the temperature limit, since brass is not as good a conductor, but the reservoir needed to be refilled constantly, so it was not a benefit in terms of ease of use. I think spraying directly on external copper wire was better in terms of cooling down. (See above.) But ultimately, I suspect that the liquid must be applied directly to the skin (with some tissue to control where it flows) to most effectively transfer heat away from the skin (which freezes the cells). Your original concept seems to be the best approach. Thank you for this very useful how-to-do (instructable)!

    0
    zebedi
    zebedi

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    Has anyone pointed out that all these refrigerants that you are using are CFC's, and therefore highly damaging to the environment? They are mostly banned as propellants in forward thinking countries.

    0
    codongolev
    codongolev

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    those are illegal nowadays, and are therefore not in anything.

    0
    JoB109
    JoB109

    Reply 1 year ago

    Tetrafluoroethane is in an air horn I got for scaring off coyotes. It comes w a warning about frostbite.

    0
    LightSpeed1
    LightSpeed1

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    These are propellants. The Chlorofluorocarbon I tested was the only CFC and that was an old can from before they banned such things. Most of these use 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane which has no chlorine in it. I trust that if these propellants were bad for the environment, they would already have been banned. I believe the scientific community has finally come around to the realization that the real culprit in ozone depletion was the chlorine, not the fluorine. Chlorine is an extremely active element. Thanks for your comment.

    0
    cgel1015
    cgel1015

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    LightSpeed1: I think you are forgetting the fact that it is neither fluorine nor chlorine (nor carbon for that matter) that is the culprit for the environment, but rather the CFC as a whole. Also you are missing the point about reactivity. It is not reactivity, but rather lack thereof that makes these chemicals dangerous. CFCs' lack of reactivity gives them a lifespan which can exceed 100 years in some cases. This gives them time to diffuse into the upper stratosphere. Here, the sun's ultraviolet radiation is strong enough to break off the chlorine atom, which on its own is a highly reactive free radical. This catalyzes the break up of ozone into oxygen by means of a variety of mechanisms, of which the simplest is:

    Cl· + O3 → ClO· + O2

    ClO· + O3 → Cl· + 2 O2

    Source: Wikipedia

    0
    LightSpeed1
    LightSpeed1

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    I am not a chemist, but I appreciate what you are saying here. I have a chemist friend who says it is the Chlorine that is the culprit rather than the Flourine element since the Fl is too heavy to get high into the atmosphere, even by brownian motion and diffusion: heavier molecules tend to lay lower in the atmosphere. We certainly are in agreement about Cl. Doesn't O2 become O3 again rather easily through the action of lightning? Isn't there enough lightning to undo the damage of free radicals like Cl? Just wondering. Source: Trivial Knowledge in the back of my brain. ;-)

    0
    Prometheus
    Prometheus

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    This is why I only use -anes like butane and propane for this, without any chloro- or fluoro- in them. Simply use butane (not so cold, longer application), propane (far colder), or nitrogen (superb but expensive and/or inconvenient to obtain). Butane will suffice, but you gotta be a man about it and be patient as well. Some warts will take multiple applications to remove. For the record, fluorine may not have been assessed as much a danger as chlorinated products to the environment, but is not entirely so far removed from chlorine. The real depletion of the ozone layer is hydrocarbons that bond to oxygen on contact, which is especially why Halon was banned as a fire-suppressant...but then again, Halon was a fluorinated-methane: Halon 1311 (bromotrifluoromethane, CBrF3), or Halon 1211 (bromochlorodifluoromethane, CF2ClBr). Just dropping an FYI, if this information is helpful.

    0
    StephenG170
    StephenG170

    1 year ago on Step 1

    She IS cute, but warts are contagious. The least useful information i read was to wrap the ailing phalang with a rag soak it in gasoline and light it on fire. I'm wondering if i can use one of those 5 watt laser pointers. I would presume that a medical laser is finely tuned.

    0
    StephenG170
    StephenG170

    1 year ago on Step 5

    Works but be forewarned. I had one a half inch big like a piece of gum on my finger that came back. First i paid a doctor $80 for 10 minutes to freeze it with carbon dioxide. It turned white and fell off in 4 weeks. He told me to let it come off by itself but there may be cells left that would come back. But after my finger thawed IT HURT LIKE I HAD A BROKEN ARM or a SERIOUS HIT FROM A HAMMER for three days!!! YEOWWW! Next time i want vicodin! The big hole it left grew back with normal skin. I got it from my girlfriend, and another friend got it from me! Just don't let them grow too big and keep after them.

    0
    BrianS480
    BrianS480

    3 years ago

    I have had some success with freeze spray but it isn't the same as liquid nitrogen. Freeze spray freezes down to -40 to -60 degrees, liquid nitrogen is -300 degrees. So, freeze spray freezes slower and penetrates less than liquid nitrogen. The trick that I found to make freeze spray more effective is to pre chill the area before applying. Hold an ice cube to the wart, mole, etc... for at least 5 minutes. If it's on a finger, even better to dunk in ice water. The point is to get the area as close to the freezing point as possible before applying the freeze spray. This cools down the skin and reduces blood flow as well which allows the freeze spray to freeze harder and deeper.

    0
    taetakacs
    taetakacs

    3 years ago

    I just went to the doctor. He took a can of liquid nitrogen that came with a straw. The kit had translucent white mini funnels in it with different sized holes for different sized warts. You can buy liquid nitrogen in a can online. Same with a set of plastic mini funnels. Stick the funnel on the wart. Apply pressure. This isolates the area. Spray on liquid nitrogen for a few seconds. Let it bubble and evaporate for a few secs. Apply again. Then at most a third time. Lift off the funnel. You just freeze dried your wart. Your body thinks the small area got frostbite. If the wart has a raised surface use flat toenail clippers to clip it flat. The skin will turn grayish white in a day (this was on Caucasian completion skin). It is dead skin. It will possibly blister and redden. It may peel or flake off or come off in a clump. Underneath it will be pink and ooze. Once the raw skin is exposed underneath, keep it out in the open and dry. Don't cover it with sweaty plastic bandages. Let it scab up and reheal. Before the dead skin falls off, you can facilitate exfoliation with over the counter wart removal kits. I love the ones with the little skin shaped discs that go right on top of the wart, and you cover it with a round disc shaped band aid. The discs contain salycilic acid which dries out the skin and makes the dead stuff fall off quicker. At night I take off the disc, let it air out and dry. Reapply in am and wear all day long. If you work with your hands, cook food, wash dishes, etc just wear disposable powdered latex gloves to keep it dry. My doc said to use the little discs then after it heals for a while to promote regeneration of that area. If it doesn't work then do the freeze drying again after it heals. Maybe apply liquid nitrogen four or five times if it's deep and aggressive. Doc said warts are caused by a virus that tricks the immune system and hides from it. Freeze drying is man made frostbite he said, and it stimulates the immune system to regenerate tissue and repair the area down at a deep level. For bad deep warts surgery may be needed. This was for a wart on my hand and not a nasty plantar wart like you guys have talked about here.

    0
    nandar5
    nandar5

    4 years ago

    Removing Our Moles, Warts, and Skin Tags Safely and Naturally. http://goo.gl/7p5sH7

    0
    Colonel88
    Colonel88

    10 years ago on Introduction

    I removed my wart using some plant. I don't know what it is called in English but when you break open the stem yellow juice comes out. My wart was gone in a week.

    0
    chuckr44
    chuckr44

    12 years ago on Introduction

    If they are on your feet they are likely plantar's warts. You have to get them removed as soon as you see them. My sister had big surgery to get a 3 inch blob of them removed from her foot because she ignored them. When I found one on my foot, I cut it out myself with a pocket knife. Be sure to get all of the black core which goes wayyyy down into the skin.

    0
    ReeRee2510
    ReeRee2510

    Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

    How far would you say they go into the skin? I am scared because I have had some on my right foot for years.... I scared myself by looking up images of Plantars warts.... And some of the images, half of the toe or foot layer is gone...

    0
    firemanfu
    firemanfu

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    I had 7 one both feet for a bout a year and i finally dremeled them off, it only bled for like an hour

    0
    reeding
    reeding

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    dremel?!?!?!? isn't that over kill? I used a small utility knife.