Tire Spreader

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Introduction: Tire Spreader

About: Retired Firefighter 1966 to 1986; Retired Wheat Farmer 1987 to 2003. Drapery Sales 1969 to 1987. 17 year Quintuple Heart Bypass Surgery Survivor; 14 year Melanoma Cancer Survivor. 81 years young.

When inspecting or repairing an automobile tire, it is really difficult to get the tire spread far enough to get to the inside of the tire. I have needed this tool for 50 years, but kept putting off making one until now. I could have bought a similar tool for $150 to $450 online, but since I am retired, I decided to make one from scrap steel from my junk pile.

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Step 1: Supplies Needed

The 4 legged bottom of it is an old TV stand I repurposed, but I could have made it from angle iron or pipe

Various pieces of steel rod, pipe and a couple of bolts.

A welder of some kind. I used a MIG welder

An acetylene/oxygen torch for heating & bending rods

Step 2: Engineering It

The hook on the left side just hooks inside the bead of the tire.

The hook on the right is attached to a handle.

The handle pulls the hook, spreading the tire, extending on an arc, until it goes past center and locks the hook, holding the tire wide open.

Step 3: Finished Product

Cost = $0

Time to build = 2 to 3 hours

It is light enough to store about anywhere and carry anywhere.

It is strong enough to do the job.

I know, it's not all that pretty, but pretty does not get the job done and all my DIY tools are "one-offs".

If you need more photos, you probably should go to eBay or Amazon and shell out the $350.00 instead of making one. You can get a nice base for it for an additional $100.00. One that's pneumatic powered runs $1600.00. (plus S/H, of course) Still haven't convinced you? You say you can't make it? Sure you can, I'm 79 and I did.

This one is a great tool. I wish I had made it years ago. At least the grandkids can use it.

Before and After Contest

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Metal Contest

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    9 Discussions

    0
    michaelrobbutler
    michaelrobbutler

    4 years ago

    Excellent work, very impressed with this, great project especially for a beginner because you can make it as simply or as complicated as you would like

    0
    graydog111
    graydog111

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    Thanks michaelrobbutler. You are right about "great project especially for a beginner". It's one of the simplest projects I've made, but it's use will be timeless. Here are 2 companion tools for dismounting and mounting tires. The first 2 pics show a 1" x 2" rectangle tube with a handle to break a tire bead loose from a wheel. It temporarily anchors on the frame of my shop for use and then dismounts for storage. A tab bolted to shop frame holds the top of 1x2 in place while being used.

    The 3rd pic is a Freon tank with a 2" ball valve used to blast air into a tire to force the tire beads onto the wheel. Don't try welding on Freon tank unless you are VERY confident of your welding skill.

    Both really work good and were easy to make.

    IMG_0179.jpgDSCF0493.JPGDSCF0315.JPG
    0
    Stryderx
    Stryderx

    4 years ago on Introduction

    Pretty simple and yet really useful, very good project to share!

    0
    graydog111
    graydog111

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    Thanks Stryderx. I like projects that are useful, easy to make, and inexpensive. This fit all 3 requirements.

    0
    Phil B
    Phil B

    4 years ago

    Good job, Jack.

    0
    seamster
    seamster

    4 years ago on Introduction

    This looks like a perfect homemade solution. I'm glad you shared this, thank you!

    0
    graydog111
    graydog111

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    Thanks seamster. I had intended to make a base like this one I made out of an old John Deere flywheel for a hose reel, but opted for the lightweight TV Stand to conserve floor space in my shop.

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