Upcycled Tin Can Planter

About: I'm an electrical engineering student at Cedarville University and an experimental electronics hobbyist. I've been hacking and making things, both electrical and mechanical, my entire life and it's just abo...

Intro: Upcycled Tin Can Planter

I like plants, I've always liked plants. Growing up I liked to mess around in the garden, start my own little seedlings, explore the fauna of the woods and the like. Unfortunately, being in a dorm room at college makes it a bit tricky to have a garden, so I like to keep some smaller houseplants, mostly succulents because they're fine with lower light. I just bought a small Jade Plant to add to my collection, but didn't have anything to plant it in. Looking around I spotted a pineapple can that I had just emptied and thought it might look cool to use that as a pot. Then I remembered I had some twine and thought it would look much better wrapped with that. Turns out, it does actually look pretty nice, plus, it's mostly recycled.

Step 1: Prepare the Can

First you need to clean out the can and take the label off. It doesn't have to be super clean, just a little soap and warm water to rinse the juice out, and don't worry about getting all the little bits of label off either, it'll just be covered with twine anyway. Then take a screwdriver, knife, scissors, etc and punch some holes in the bottom of the can for drainage. Remember to be careful when you do this, there are sharp things all over.

Step 2: Wrap the Can

This step is pretty self-explanatory, take some twine/hemp/string, use superglue or hot glue to secure the first couple wraps, and wind it around the can until the whole thing is covered. Use some glue on the last couple wraps as well to keep them in place.

Step 3: Fill With Dirt

Obviously the pot needs dirt in it, but with the holes in the bottom, at least some of the dirt would come out and make a mess. To solve this, take a circle (roughly) of foam, you could use fabric or something instead, and put it in the bottom of the can. Then fill it most of the way with whatever type of soil your intended plant likes, I used a mix of peat and composted manure.

Step 4: Add the Plant

Finally, plant your plant. Dig a little divot in the soil, take the little plant out of its plastic pot, gently place it in the divot, and lightly pack some dirt around it. Depending on the plant, you might have to water it thoroughly to settle the dirt around it. I had a Jade Plant, which does not like to be watered right after being moved. There you go, a happy plant in a nice looking upcycled pot.

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    2 Discussions

    That was my first thought after i had the idea as well. Fortunately, these food cans have a lining in them that prevents the metal from corroding when they have food in them and that lining works just as well with the water in soil. It may develop a very small amount of rust on the edges of the holes in the bottom, but that won't hurt anything and will probably be too little to notice.