Wooden Weber Q Stand

1,187

11

BBQ stand to suit Weber Q or any small portable bbq of choice.

Includes storage and preparation surface.

Teacher Notes

Teachers! Did you use this instructable in your classroom?
Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson.

Step 1: INTRO - Design

My aim was to build a wooden stand for my Weber BBQ.

I decided to incorporate storage for tools, spices, sauces, and cleaning equipment, aswell as under bbq storage for hotplate and pizza stone! The first thing I did was design the project in Google Sketchup and Cinema 4D

The preparation surface will include a granite stone for meat prep.

Step 2: Constructing the Frame

I began by cutting 2 lengths of 42x32 Merbau at 1600mm, and 4 lengths at 476mm.

I then marked and cut the Mortise and Tenon joints as shown, then glued and clamped the frame together.

Step 3: Constructing the Two 'Boxes'

The 'boxes' are constructed from 1200mm lengths of 165x19 Blackbutt timber boards.

I prepared the boards by marking and cutting biscuit joints on a large flat surface, then clamping and gluing the boards to make 4 flat slabs.

These were then planed flat and cut to length using a circular saw.

I then glued the boards together as shown

To fit the granite stone slab I constructed a frame around the stone, and routered out a recess to fit a piece of mdf to the underside of the frame.

Step 4: Legs

The legs are constructed from recycled deck posts.

Prepare the posts by squaring them using a thicknesser.
I positioned them as desired, and used a diagonal lap joint to connect them together.
I also cut lap joints at the tops of the legs for the frame to sit on.
Using a forstner drill bit I bored holes so that the bolts holding the legs together would sit flush with the surface. (it is a good idea to drill a small pilot hole so that the bolt holes line up.

Step 5: Assembly

I drilled some dowels and used them to line the 'boxes' up with the frame, they will just sit on it and not be glued, allowing for easy disassembly.
The legs are then joined to the frame and boxes using bolts and coach screws.

To get a good surface finish I used an orbital sander with fine paper. Any outdoor furniture oil or vanish can then be applied to create a strong durable surface.

The granite stone can be held in using clear silicone, or sat in without attachment so it can be cleaned.

Woodworking Contest

Participated in the
Woodworking Contest

Be the First to Share

    Recommendations

    • Made with Math Contest

      Made with Math Contest
    • Cardboard Speed Challenge

      Cardboard Speed Challenge
    • Multi-Discipline Contest

      Multi-Discipline Contest

    Discussions