World's Easiest Silicone Mold.

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Introduction: World's Easiest Silicone Mold.

About: I used to work for instructables.com, now I just make stuff. // follow me to see what I'm up to: https://www.echoechostudio.com

Yep. That's right. I am about to change your mold-making technique forever. This simple way of silicone mold-making will have you wanting to make casts of all your trinkets and toys.

2020 Edit:

If you are looking to use this mold making technique to do life-casting or food casting, these molds are not skin or food safe.

If you want to make a food-safe mold or life-casting, I recommend these kits:

Supplies:

You will need:

Step 1: Make Your Catalyzing Solution.

By mixing a high-concentration of dish soap with water in a bowl, one is actually making a catalytic bath for your silicone. The glycerine in the dish soap accelerates the cure process for of your 100% pure silicone.

This is by no means an exact science, I use blue dish soap because it allows me to see how much I have added to a water bath, I approximate that I used 4 oz. of soap in 64 oz. of water.

Step 2: Catalyzing the Silicone.

Cut off the tip of the silicone caulk tube, and set it in the caulking gun. Unload enough silicone to surround the desired object, into the bath.

I use the whole tube usually.

Step 3: Preparing the Silicone.

While keeping your hand submerged in the dish-soap catalyzing bath, gently clump the string of silicone together. Form it into a ball, and slowly massage it. Fold it, stretch it out, and work it very much like one would knead dough.

When it begins to become a bit less malleable, and stiffen, it is time to sink your positive into your material. In this case, Mike helped me, and we used his dinosaur, Jesus. (hay-zoos)

Step 4: Make Sure the Mold Is Water Tight.

The best way to make sure your mold is watertight is to add a kind of thick-ish layer of silicone to the surface area of your object. Note how the dinosaur is padded by about a 1/2" layer of silicone all around its body. Also, I have left a considerable amount of the dinosaur uncovered, as I am only casting half of this figure.

You want to make sure you can still wiggle your figure out of your mold, without any of it getting caught, otherwise it can be very tricky to extract once your mold has set.

Step 5: Let It Cure.

It will take about an hour for a full cure of your mold, before you can use it. Allow your object to remain in the mold while it cures. When the mold is no longer tacky to the touch, and feels rigid, gently remove your positive.

We kept this mold on top of the fridge, and put a bit of soapy water down on the plate so that the silicone didn't meld with the paper plate.

Also, this part smells awful. Make sure you do all this in a well-ventilated space.

Step 6: Use Your Mold!

We made a sparkly rendition of Jesus with clear casting resin and glitter. When the resin began to gel we set three LEDs inside of him. Behold the sparkliest light up dinosaur in West!

____

This project uses affiliate links that help me make more awesome DIY projects and tutorials - thanks for your support!

15 People Made This Project!

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478 Discussions

0
justjoyce
justjoyce

Question 23 days ago on Step 6

I tried this pin and followed carefully all directions. My silicone mold did not harden all the way, it is still sticky. I'm not sure what I could have done wrong? Is there anything I can do to fix it?

0
Salinaobrien1660
Salinaobrien1660

Question 6 weeks ago on Step 2

I made a mold using this method, however after sitting over night the mold looked great, but after I poured my resin in and applied heat to remove bubbles it made this milky water on top of my resin! I used 100% silicone, what did I do wrong?

0
aeons90
aeons90

Question 6 weeks ago

Hi, I was wondering if it matters what temperature the water is. I figure it comes down to personal comfort level since the silicone is supposed to be waterproof, but I'm just about to start this adventure and have no idea lol. I apologize if I missed the info in the article or any previous answers. Thank you :)

0
TzAngels
TzAngels

Tip 7 weeks ago

Just an FYI...I learned that using latex gloves will stop the silicone from curing and "doing its thing". Make sure you use Nitrile or Vinyl gloves.

0
usman.akmal
usman.akmal

2 months ago

Can this kind of silicon be used for making 3D objects? Or do I need 2-part silicon which is less thick and can be poured? Thank you.

0
audreyobscura
audreyobscura

Reply 2 months ago

I would definitely recommend using 2 part silicone for that, and you'll have to use a plastic mold so the silicone doesn't bond to the mold.

I've been using that linked mold material lots of mold release on my cast objects with great results.

1
beccadefoor32
beccadefoor32

Question 2 months ago on Step 3

Can you reuse the water for another mold?

0
tobywinks
tobywinks

3 months ago on Step 6

I’m hoping to be able to mold number two plastic with this, recycled knife handles

image.jpg
0
hsdesaiart
hsdesaiart

Question 4 months ago on Step 5

Hi
I want to make a mould of a vase and want to make sure that the whole shape is casted. I see that you have left the back of dinosaur open-how did you manage to get the back hump and tail?
If I use this method will the silicone becaome hard enough to hold the shape when I pour the cast in it? I can use another tube inside to keep the center hollow. Attaching the vase standing upside down (narrow part is the neck). Its about 20cm tall

Gumnutvase.jpg
0
audreyobscura
audreyobscura

Answer 4 months ago

Pretty vase.

Ok, couple of questions - what is your final casting material? do you want the vase to still be hollow? Do you need to make more than one copy?

0
hsdesaiart
hsdesaiart

Reply 4 months ago

Yes. Want to make an inverted lamp shade like a gumnut shape. So has to be hollow

0
audreyobscura
audreyobscura

Reply 3 months ago

Have you ever heard of a process called rotocasting? That's a really good way to make hollow shapes. You could also use brush on silicon to create the mold if you could some how support the mold walls. Definitely a tricky shape.

0
EmilyJ-2231
EmilyJ-2231

Question 4 months ago on Step 4

Can I use regular polymer clay with this mold? Or do i have to use the liquid clay? if i sued regular clay, would i have to bake it differently? Thanks :)

0
audreyobscura
audreyobscura

Answer 4 months ago

Hey there, if the clay is able to air dry - it will work in this mold - you may want to check out Smooth Sil 940 too, I found this video on how to use it's slightly stiffer rubber compound 960. https://youtu.be/lOWQ7xFLOaQ

0
charlotte.sainsbury

Hi, I know this is an old post so don't know if you'll reply or can help! When I put my silicone in the water with soap it just all floated off in bits and didn't stay together. I managed to gradually gather some back together but most of it was dispersed in the water. What did I do wrong? Thanks



0
billthetailor
billthetailor

Reply 1 year ago

Not all 100% silicones are the same. For instance there are two types of GE Silicone, type I and type II. Type I is what you want. It needs to smell strongly of acetic acid (vinegar).

0
ShaniM7
ShaniM7

Reply 1 year ago

Can you use type II also? I have a heap of neutral curing silicone at home but not the acetic type. Why can't this be used?

0
bucklipe
bucklipe

Reply 5 months ago

The type 1 silicone needs moisture to cure.
Dispensing type 1 into a bucket with water and blue dish soap starts the process throughout the mass of silicone.
If you just dumped the untreated silicone on an object it would skin over and not cure for months internally.
It skins over due to atmosheric humidity and "protects" the rest of it.
Type 2 silicone outgasses methanol(?) and is not water dependant.
I do wonder if the corn starch method would work for type 2?

0
DebS115
DebS115

Question 1 year ago on Introduction

can this be used with liquid polymer clay and baked?

0
bucklipe
bucklipe

Answer 5 months ago

Yes. Liquid polymer clay will safely bake in the silicone mold. Silicone of this type will withstand temps up to around 350 degrees.