Yellow Cuff Bracelet

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About: There are three Pegasauruses who dwell within this cavernous estuary of design. As the eldest, I am known as Mother, keeper of the bank account, guardian of the social media passwords, and evil enforcer of t...

Yellow is bright, uplifting, and positive. Everything the world needs right now.

Also, bananas are yellow, and they contain potassium. Potassium helps maintain muscle function, heart beat, and blood filtration in the liver.

Therefor...

Yellow is responsible for life. All hail the Yellow... Our brutal but just overlord... Creator of all... Destroyer of darkness.

In honor of yellow and all it gloriousness, I wanted to make a cuff bracelet showcasing it's many shades. And by many, I mean three, because truthfully, yellow is a challenging color to get creative with.

I do like the way it turned out though and plan on wearing it a lot this summer.

Step 1: Clean and Prep

Cleaning and prepping your cuff bracelet is a boring but necessary part of creating something beautiful and lasting.

First, make sure you have all your materials. You will need:

One cuff blank (I got mine from Michael's Craft Store. It is silver color, but not made from actual silver)

Narrow masking/painters tape

Small paint brushes

Rubbing alcohol

Sandpaper

High Gloss Sealant

Acrylic and enamel paints in white and shades of yellow

*I had originally planned to paint in only enamels, but I couldn't get the lids off my tiny model paint pots, so I instead used white enamel base and acrylic color*

Next, make sure there are no oils or any type of residue on the bracelet by washing it with dish soap, drying it with a soft cloth, then using a cotton ball, gently rubbing it with rubbing alcohol.

When the bracelet is cleaned, tape an area off to be left as negative space in your design. I chose to leave one thin line at the edge, but you can put it right through the center, or wherever you desire.

Step 2: Sand

To make sure the color stays on the bracelet, it is important to create a rougher texture to give the paint/enamel something to grip.

I used a rough grit sandpaper scrap I found in my tool box. It doesn't matter the size, as long as it scuffs the bracelet. Your goal is to take away the shiny...

After taking this picture I decided it wasn't rough enough and spent some more time sanding it in different directions.

Step 3: Paint

Paint the base with a heavy coat of white enamel. Keep in mind that you won't be adding the yellow on top, but rather into the white.

While the white is still wet, add the lightest yellow and swirl it into the white with your paintbrush. My lightest/brightest yellow shade was Medium Yellow.

In a different section, add a medium shade of yellow and swirl it into the white and pale yellow. My medium shade of yellow was Yellow Ochre.

In smaller sections, add the darkest yellow and pull it into the other colors. Do not use too much of the darkest yellow as it will dominate the other shades. My darkest yellow was Deep Yellow.

If any paint goes over the edge, wipe it off with a damp cloth.

When the paint dries, if you notice your colored area is not quite yellow enough, paint a thing layer of the brightest yellow (Medium Yellow for me) over the entire area. This creates a 'wash' of yellow over everything.

Step 4: Seal

When the paint is dry, gently pull off the tape.

Because we used acrylic instead of all enamel, it is best to seal your painting. I used High Gloss Instant Clear Coat from Dominion Sure Seal for this. It's used more for cars than for crafts, but it works perfectly for wearable metal art (in my opinion).

*I decided to add a touch of gold glitter, and rough up the edges of the paint a bit before sealing. My style is best described as Sparkly Pirate, but if yours isn't feel free to keep the edges crisp and the 'marble' glitter free*

To seal your cuff bracelet, place it on a piece of cardboard or table in a well ventilated area and spray the sealant evenly over the piece. Let it dry for 10 minutes then apply another thin coat.

Let the cuff bracelet dry thoroughly before touching, usually between 30-40 minutes.

When the seal dries your cuff is ready to wear.

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    Penolopy Bulnick

    4 months ago

    I like how you had the paint thick and swirly! Makes me think of Van Gogh :)