Bug Bite/sting Salve

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a very simple way to help reduce the itching and stinging of a bug bite

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Step 1: What You Need

- a bowl or pestle and morter
- a spoon, any size is ok
- water
- a box of baking soda

Step 2: The Mixing Part

1.take 1 heaping spoonfull of the powder and put it in your bowl or pestle and morter

Step 3: #2

2. mix a few drops of water into the powder but not too much! otherwise it will be too watery
also stir the two into a paste, it should look almost like cottage cheese

Step 4: Time to Use It

apply to the bug bite and the baking soda will help draw the toxins out of the bite and make it not itch while the mixture is on the skin. even afterwards if you need to remove the mixture the bite wont be as annoying or itchy. you can always put more of the mixture on if needed. [ im not totaly shure about the toxins part but that is what i have heard ] also freezing this mixture then putting it on the bite also helps

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    23 Discussions

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    u_kress

    2 years ago

    Thank you for sharing this simple way of insect bite treatment. My personal favorit is the heat method e.g. http://insektenstichebehandeln.de/riemser-pharma-bite-away-stichheiler-test-erfahrung-vergleich/ You can do this in different effective ways at home.

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    Kzummo

    6 years ago on Introduction

    i'm a boy scout and this will help me A TON at camps!

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    camo3497GainEnergy

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    The best thing for bee stings or yellow jacket stings is to break off a small peice of alka seltzer put it on the sting and wet it . Even kids quit crying within 1 minuite .

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    17hmr243

    6 years ago on Introduction

    healthy bug spray


    half baby oil
    half dettol disinfectant
    splash tee tree oil or eucalyptus oil

    mix and rub on skin 2 hr re apply

    it will split into dif layers over night so shake b4 use

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    love4pds

    6 years ago on Introduction

    PLEASE, if you get bitten by a tick go to the doctor and get antibiotics!!!!! Even if you don't see a rash. Only 50% of people with Lyme have had a rash and if you go Untreated you can get very very sick years later. VERY SICK!!!
    https://www.facebook.com/UNDEROURSKIN

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    diannagaillemonie

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    This is a very good article. Thanks for suggesting it. It explains the chemical science of the various bites and stings and how to remedy them.

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    jeff-olemonie

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    And apparently, probably no more effective than any other folk-remedy. Calamine lotion works pretty well for mosquito bites, though.

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    jeff-olemonie

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    No, apparently a mixture of zinc oxide and iron oxide. No proof that it works, though...

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    jeff-olemonie

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    Yep, they're held in suspension along with a few nice-smelling ingredients.

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    diannagail

    8 years ago on Introduction

    When I was in Kauai I got in the middle of a jellyfish swarm. I had whelps and stings all over my body where my bathing suit wasn't. I was in real pain and was starting to feel the numbness from the toxin. I was told urine would work but it's harder for a gal to apply directly :). I instead rushed to the store and got some apple cider vinegar and dosed myself. After that I carried a large bottle of cider vinegar in the truck :| It's the acid in the urine that makes it works and it's usually readily available unless you dumped it when you got stung... :(

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    rimar2000

    9 years ago on Introduction

    There are innumerable substances used to ease pain and/or itching of insect bite: turpentine, urine, vinegar, baking soda, aloe, etc. All are more or less effective, surely that depends on many factors.

    4 replies
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    rimar2000meanbean

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Yes, applying it in situ, obviously. I don't know how good it is, but some people use it.

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    rimar2000d2j5

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    I don't know. An uncle told me that a swarm of wasps stung him, and despair rightly found that the first thing to hand, which was just turpentine, and instantly the pain stopped. These were his words, I never use it for that.