Folding Sawhorse

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Introduction: Folding Sawhorse

an easy to build, folding sawhorse -

you'll need:

4 - pieces 2 x 4, 30" long
2 - pieces 1/2" plywood, 1' x 3'
2 - 16 penny nails
1 - short piece of rope

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Step 1: Legs

legs are 2x4's, 30" long - make 4 per sawhorse. Note chamfer on one end - this prevents binding when opening sawhorse.

Step 2: First Side, Step 1

fasten plywood to two of the legs - note position of chamfers.

Step 3: First Side, Step 2

drill holes (for pivot point)

Step 4: Second Side, First Step

hammer 16 penny nails into the other two leg at the pivot points (make sure the chamfers are positioned correctly). cut the heads off the nails, leaving one inch. instert the nails into the holes in the other legs (see picture).

Step 5: Second Side, Step 2

fasten the second piece of plywood to the second set of legs

Step 6: Last Step

drill holes to attach stop rope (I didn't draw the rope, because I was to lazy to figure out how to draw a knot with Google Sketchup!) just take a piece of rope about a foot long, stick it through the holes, then tie a knot in each end (or tie it like I did in the photo of the folded sawhorse, laying on the ground, on the first page).

Step 7: Rope Stop

OK, I got off my lazy butt and figured out how to draw a rope stop - here it is.

Step 8: You're Done!

stand the sawhorse up and spread the legs apart as far as the stop rope will let them go. I've had a pair of these for twenty years, and they're still plenty strong.

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    21 Discussions

    0
    AlexB622
    AlexB622

    Question 1 year ago on Introduction

    Great design, but I would just like to ask; what angle did you use for the legs

    0
    russingram
    russingram

    Reply 1 year ago

    45 degrees.

    0
    AlexB622
    AlexB622

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thankyou

    0
    russingram
    russingram

    7 years ago on Step 6

    1 1/2" sheetrock screws. you could add some wood glue if you wated to be sure they never come apart...

    0
    Lightkeeper
    Lightkeeper

    7 years ago on Step 6

    Maybe it's just me, but What did you use to attach the plywood to the 2x4s? Otherwise they look great.

    Nice design, nice instructable! I put together two from scrap in short order. I didn't have any nails, but I did have a chunk of copper pipe left over from another project. I used 3" lengths of pipe and drilled holes with a paddle bit to make the hinges. Thanks!

    0
    jfarry
    jfarry

    8 years ago on Introduction

    Very good write up, made four for myself! Extremely easy! Gave you credit of course when I did my own write up about my experiences! Thank you!!

    http://justmejustin.tumblr.com/post/7517913461/diy-saw-horse

    0
    russingram
    russingram

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Awesome, I'm glad you found my instructable useful.

    0
    unclechime
    unclechime

    9 years ago on Introduction

    just built a set...used 35 inch legs, 1 1/8 plywood for tops(48x8), and replaced 16 penny nails with 3/8 by 8 inch bolts. feel so sturdy I am thinking twice about the retaining rope. Can stand on both of them and they feel solid(200 lbs). Will likely put rope if I use it for heavy loads.

    0
    4airtime
    4airtime

    12 years ago on Introduction

    Great instructable, just made a set, one 32"& one 36" wide. I used 40" legs which gave a working height of 34-36"(thanx jackbroo). I used allthread instead of nails. These things are sturdy.

    0
    cferrando
    cferrando

    12 years ago on Introduction

    I just made a pair today. Nice idea and seems strong. I made mine out of 1X4's for the legs and 6" redwood dogeared fence for the span on the top. Also ripped down a couple of pieces of redwood at 2 1/2" and screwed them about 6" up from bottom of legs. This is where I attached my rope. With the rope lower on the sawhorse it seems to be sturdier. I am going to set these out in the weather for about a month to see how they hold up. If they do well without alot of warping and twisting, I will be making about 40 more. It beats paying $30 a pair at home depot. Great idea, thanks for sharing it.

    0
    jackbroo
    jackbroo

    12 years ago on Introduction

    I just built a set. The next time I would use longer legs.

    0
    hassi
    hassi

    12 years ago on Introduction

    I'll have one of these built this weekend...A darned good take on a necessary item... Cheers and a hearty "+"

    0
    russingram
    russingram

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    cool - I'm glad to know someone else found the design to be useful!

    0
    zachninme
    zachninme

    13 years ago

    Thanks for making a CAD drawing because you had no example, or no camera... (something I wouldn't do...) Cool!

    0
    russingram
    russingram

    Reply 13 years ago

    actually, I have both. I just like playing with Google Sketchup (and it's free!). I'll take a pic and post, later.

    0
    russingram
    russingram

    Reply 13 years ago

    I actually saw a set on a jobsite made with hinges...they used 1x4's instead of 2x4's. I didn't have any hinges, so I came up with this idea. They're actuall pretty stable...I've put a 2x12 across them to stand on while painting.