Handmade Balans Chair

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Introduction: Handmade Balans Chair

About: I'm a 18 years old high school student who is acting a 23 years old graduate student in Japan.

handmade balans chair

I made a balans chair referring to Varier Variable balans.
http://www.varierfurniture.com/Collections/Human-instruments/Variable-balans-R/


You have to prepare
- boards 18mm thick, over 530*500mm
- a CNC milling machine capable of cutting over 530*500mm

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Step 1:

Please download a zip folder.

balans4share_ai.zip contains ai files (I made them with CS3),
balans4share_pdf contains pdf files.

Step 2:

Cut the plans by a CNC milling machine.

I used Rockler CNC shark pro
(http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=19666)
with BOSCH PMR 500
(http://www.bosch.co.jp/jp/pt/products/model.asp?id=PMR500).
with an 6mm endmill.

Step 3:

Assemble the parts.

You will need many hands when you assemble the seat part/the knee part with the bars
because you have to assemble all the bars at the same time
and wood naturally curves slightly so it will be very difficult for one person to do it.

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    15 Discussions

    0
    naim
    naim

    Question 1 year ago

    Awesome. I spent some time looking for and instructable on kneeling chairs but the only one I found didn't provide enough measurements. I want to make one out of HDPE. I've always wanted to work with HDPE. I'll shop around for more ideas. Thanks.

    0
    yuichirose
    yuichirose

    Answer 1 year ago

    Thanks! The first comment in this 6-7 years!
    I think you should lessen the number of the beams because it would be very difficult to assemble as I mentioned in the instruction and also they would prevent your feet from touching the ground and that would not be comfortable.
    Or the beams should be assembled-from-above type like the connecting part of the sides of this chair so that it would be much easier to assemble.

    0
    fbeaudoin
    fbeaudoin

    8 years ago on Step 3

    Two questions, why aren't each of the sides made made from a sigle piece of plywood? Also, it seems to me, watching the video commercial for the Variér Furniture that leaving the center of the bottom part empty would allow the feet to touch the ground comfortably.

    0
    yuichirose
    yuichirose

    Reply 8 years ago on Step 3

    Thanks for your comment!

    > why aren't each of the sides made made from a sigle piece of plywood?
    That is due to the size of my machine(Rockler CNC Shark Pro).

    > leaving the center of the bottom part empty would allow the feet to touch the ground comfortably.
    Yes, I originally wanted to leave the part empty, but I didn't do that for its strength.
    I want to revise it.

    0
    tux_linux
    tux_linux

    8 years ago on Introduction

    no tracing needed. Just apply printer tape to the wood and glue the plan on. You can work on it and pull the plan off pretty simple.

    What are those circles in each corner? You used a CNC-robot - isn't that one able to cut that without such marks like a wood worker would be able to?

    0
    yuichirose
    yuichirose

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Miilling machines usually use an endmill to cut materials
    so when you cut a rectangle, it will be rounded because of the roundness of an endmill and you cant get a correct rectangle.

    So you need to make a circle in each corner.

    0
    tux_linux
    tux_linux

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    Ah, ok, didn't know that. Well, could also be a design thingy. Anyway - well done.

    0
    bertus52x11
    bertus52x11

    8 years ago on Introduction

    Nice! You could make a rocking chair with it as well. Very well done!

    0
    yuichirose
    yuichirose

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    The wood are slightly curves naturally so they are fixed enough.
    There would be better way I guess though!

    0
    The Metal One

    this could also be accomplished by the average jigsaw, correct?

    0
    Blaaken
    Blaaken

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    yes, but you'd need to make templates to trace out patterns on the wood, and you'd also want a sandy and sand paper.