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83CommentsCobh, Co. Cork, Ireland

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  • You got my vote for the pocket-size contest! Now, I didn't see anything about recharging the battery or a way to shutdown the PI cleanly (I just burnt a SD Card with that :-/ ), did I miss something?

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  • According to Lavoisier, pretty much the same mass/weight as at the beginning of the process, hence the joke about the *impression* of the ball getting heavier (just denser). The more you tap, the smaller it gets, the denser it gets. If you tap a lot, the ball will get small enough so the wind will apply its force on a smaller surface (therefore less force) for the same mass.

    Instead of using polish or insane grit sandpaper, an easy trick is to use baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) in a rag. For the "chrome-ball" finish, toothpaste on a cloth works, for the same reason.

    According to Lavoisier, pretty much the same mass/weight as at the beginning of the process, hence the joke about the *impression* of the ball getting heavier (just denser). The more you tap, the smaller it gets, the denser it gets. If you tap a lot, the ball will get small enough so the wind will apply its force on a smaller surface (therefore less force) for the same mass.

    It'd be a math question. Provided the final mass is identical at the beginning and at the end, take the mass (in grams), divide by 2.7 to get the volume of pure aluminium (in cubic centimetres). From there, use the formula for the ball ( r = ((V/π)(3/4))⅓ -- power 1/3 is a cubic root) and you get the radius of the smallest possible ball. Everything bigger than that still contains air.

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  • I've been cutting some 50+ ribs for a hull (the shape to apply the fibreglass) and found a couple of tricks along the way:1- Scissors suck. They bend/crush the edges. The electric scroll saw found in Aldi is a bit weak for plywood but great for cardboard of any size, and much more precise than any hacksaw/bandsaw: it does make a difference. For the other tools, use woodworking tools, they work fine (drill...), but always remember cardboard is very sensitive to pressure and will collapse (crush, tear) if you're drilling to fast: take your time to approach the drill (also applies to mini-drills, to a lesser extent). Same precaution apply to the sander (don't press).2- Gluing an printed template with wallpaper glue works fine, and is a great help for cutting small/curvy shapes. Once dry and …

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    I've been cutting some 50+ ribs for a hull (the shape to apply the fibreglass) and found a couple of tricks along the way:1- Scissors suck. They bend/crush the edges. The electric scroll saw found in Aldi is a bit weak for plywood but great for cardboard of any size, and much more precise than any hacksaw/bandsaw: it does make a difference. For the other tools, use woodworking tools, they work fine (drill...), but always remember cardboard is very sensitive to pressure and will collapse (crush, tear) if you're drilling to fast: take your time to approach the drill (also applies to mini-drills, to a lesser extent). Same precaution apply to the sander (don't press).2- Gluing an printed template with wallpaper glue works fine, and is a great help for cutting small/curvy shapes. Once dry and sanded, it's an excellent first coat for painting.3- On the design side, when you're folding, cut a grove of half the thickness of the cardboard each side of the fold and cut towards the mid-line at slightly below half the angle of the fold towards the center.4- When folding, use strings and holes to maintain shapes and traction, even with hot glue. Unless you hold the thing during all the curing time (good luck with PVA...), cardboard will try to get back to its initial shape (flat). I use cotton cooking string, fishing line allows smaller holes.5- Wood screws won't work. Better make a hole with a [mini-]drill and use nylon screws with washers.6- If you wear out the area you're gluing with a thick-grit sandpaper (I use 100, but your 80 is probably better) or a sander (don't press!), you can use pretty much any glue. I use cheap PVA glue, found as a paper glue and as a wood glue. It's sensitive to water, but not as much as the cardboard itself anyway. Also, for some reason, paper soaked with wallpaper glue (and dried) seem to give a very good adherence after sanding.

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  • There's a lot more than that! If you don't add your baking soda, the casein clumps can be sieved through a sock and dried to make something called Galalith (Erinoid in the United Kingdom), a plastic that can be sculpted (but not moulded) and that is fairly resistant to heat (goes to dust beyond 700ºC, never burns). Now, if you mix (fast but thoroughly) some 2-3 spoons of baking soda to the clumps, stick it between 2 oven dishes (add lest on top and half a centimetre between the 2 dishes), put it in the oven at 60-70ºC for an hour, you get a tile that is basically a hydrofuge aerogel, with the weight mostly coming from the CO2 bubbles. However, when exposed to a blow torch, it is an active flame repellant... Amazing, isn't it? I think it's probably the secret behind "Starlit…

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    There's a lot more than that! If you don't add your baking soda, the casein clumps can be sieved through a sock and dried to make something called Galalith (Erinoid in the United Kingdom), a plastic that can be sculpted (but not moulded) and that is fairly resistant to heat (goes to dust beyond 700ºC, never burns). Now, if you mix (fast but thoroughly) some 2-3 spoons of baking soda to the clumps, stick it between 2 oven dishes (add lest on top and half a centimetre between the 2 dishes), put it in the oven at 60-70ºC for an hour, you get a tile that is basically a hydrofuge aerogel, with the weight mostly coming from the CO2 bubbles. However, when exposed to a blow torch, it is an active flame repellant... Amazing, isn't it? I think it's probably the secret behind "Starlite"...

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  • Thank you for the link o the dome calculator!

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  • I'm not against the Pi W, it's just it's unnecessary spend for retro games on a portable console.The mention of the PS3 and the Vita are about giving a price/performance reference point. At some point, it might be a project on its own to merge (or even... blend!) a second hand large monitor (say, 19 inches) with a second-hand PS3 all running on LiPos (therefore portable...), so to compare with a handheld RetroPie. Moneywise, I'm pretty sure the "portable" PS3 wins by far...

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  • It's been done in the Ben Heck Show in an overkill way (driving video signal from the GPIOs): Also, you're killing your budget with these HiRes 5 inch screens (800x480 for US$45, excuse me!), low resolution (320x240) is more than enough, and any Raspberry Pi is already overkill to emulate games that ran fine on a 4MHz Z80! Emulation Station on a Pi Zero (not W, costs less than US$10) works fine with these 4.3" reversing monitors (less than US$ 20, run fine on 5V and can be soldered directly to the composite output of the Pi, leaving you some space for the second speaker and the audio jack).Good job for gathering all the info to redesign something similar at a fraction of the price (you get a PlayStation 3 or a Vita for US$160...).

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  • There are lots of substances that can be considered as "plastics", and a few more "features" to be tested, such as the "mouldability" and "workability", or the ductility. Also, the "forming" temperature and the structure of your plastic may make a huge difference in its behaviour.Considering a plastic is most often a polymer (long chains of monomers), you can assume that a good few "natural" proteins can be transformed into plastic.For instance, take milk and vinegar (or a slightly stronger acid, like concentrated lemon juice), heat to 50ºC, stir for 20mins or so, sieve (thoroughly) through a sock to get rid of the water, apply in thin layers (use a spatula) on a flat surface. This thing is called "erinoid" and has…

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    There are lots of substances that can be considered as "plastics", and a few more "features" to be tested, such as the "mouldability" and "workability", or the ductility. Also, the "forming" temperature and the structure of your plastic may make a huge difference in its behaviour.Considering a plastic is most often a polymer (long chains of monomers), you can assume that a good few "natural" proteins can be transformed into plastic.For instance, take milk and vinegar (or a slightly stronger acid, like concentrated lemon juice), heat to 50ºC, stir for 20mins or so, sieve (thoroughly) through a sock to get rid of the water, apply in thin layers (use a spatula) on a flat surface. This thing is called "erinoid" and has pretty impressive qualities (hydrofuge, resistance to heat), can be worked with usual tools and cannot be moulded (too bad...). Making a layered structure is going to give you mechanical characteristics very different from the raw material itself... Your table may become very, very large... good luck!

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  • No, just hydrogen, aluminium oxide and heat. Aluminium oxide remains in the bottle, heat transforms the water into steam. Passing the gases (H2 and steam) through ice in a vertical pipe/tube condenses most of the steam (H2O gas) back to water (H2O liquid), so you should only get H2 (always gas in this temperature range).

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      • BalloonSat Stabilization With Compressed CO2
      • Ice Cream in a Bag
      • Which Type of Pacifier Is Better for Your Child?
  • I have several ideas for a near-sat balloon:1- on the base the balloon(s) is (are) filled with Hydrogen instead of Helium (chemistry class can help!), a mechanism able to deflate the balloon(s) (valves...) when the outside pressure is decreasing would prevent the burst and, thus, likely allow higher altitudes, while also slowing down the beginning of the fall, drop the balloons when it's getting too fast (and hot!).2- instead of a box (no need to prove the lack of aerodynamics), use a GPS to self-guide a glider, so you can make (kinda) sure that your balloons land as close as possible from where they took off (I live on a island, recovery is most likely unfeasible...).What do you think?

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  • In France, commercials are at he same volume as the res of the programme, it's mandatory. They *feel* louder because of compression and other aural tricks, but the volume remains the same, so unless you have a spectrum analyser system able to detect these tricks, you're not gonna make it with an Arduino, sorry (good luck with the sampling and the FFT analysis). A Raspberry Pi Zero may do the trick, though, but the maths behind that are a mere nightmare.Good job, though, I might get some parts of your code for something else.

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  • You can try with a hacksaw and cut from the sides of the pallet, it's basically the same idea, considerations on the blades apply too.

    ...or you can use a masonry drill bit to eject the nail with a couple of hammer hits. Better results on an open vice.

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  • Structurally, not so sturdy in the middle, but you don't care, for the structure only supports itself. The best compromise between space and sturdiness is reached with 60º lancets, especially if you build underground, but I agree it'd be a terrible waste of height if your headroom is limited by an existing ceiling.

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  • I agree... mostly.There are ways to get that off an ATMega8, and it has become cheaper than an ATTiny (now, we're talking a few cents out of a couple of quids...). The ATMega8 too has a "deep sleep" function that will make its consumption near nought (to the point where a 3V battery would deplete more by itself than by the consumption of the chip), it has the Arduino community behind it (although the community tends to shift to the ATMega328...) and the same In-System Programming interface (same family). For its environment, both chips have pretty much the same requirements in terms of current regulation and external components.Now, where I am interested with the ATTiny is when you're using I2C or SPI and everything else is already wired (with no ISP). I get that the ATTiny make…

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    I agree... mostly.There are ways to get that off an ATMega8, and it has become cheaper than an ATTiny (now, we're talking a few cents out of a couple of quids...). The ATMega8 too has a "deep sleep" function that will make its consumption near nought (to the point where a 3V battery would deplete more by itself than by the consumption of the chip), it has the Arduino community behind it (although the community tends to shift to the ATMega328...) and the same In-System Programming interface (same family). For its environment, both chips have pretty much the same requirements in terms of current regulation and external components.Now, where I am interested with the ATTiny is when you're using I2C or SPI and everything else is already wired (with no ISP). I get that the ATTiny makes a nice sensor or actuator, and I have already a few applications for that in the near future, wired to the GPIOs of an ESP8266 (again, around $2). But for the sake of required space, price and consumption, the arguments don't quite stand against the ATMega8 (unless you play "deadbugs")

    Thank you for this, it might be useful some time.Now, you can use the USBASP thing (around $2) to do the same, but, with all the other components required, it's not going to be smaller than a Nano-clone (around $2, with a lot more functions and a lot more usable pins) because the Nano is SMD, so the argument "size sometimes matter" is not very valid until you go SMD (where the ATTiny can hide in the USB plug itself). The through-hole version of the ATTiny is not very interesting for makers anyway, the ATMega8-16PU has become cheaper and a lot more powerful, while not being that much bigger with the other necessary components (6 pin ISP, the power supply, the reset button...).

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  • Oui, plein d'anglais de dictionnaire, mais ça reste compréhensible, avec moins de fautes que n'importe quel blog en français. La traduction de "Tampon" est "Pad", comme dans "tampon-encreur", pas "Buffer".Now, I didn't even know about shellac, I might try that some day, thank you for the idea.

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  • Well, at USD200, you already blew the budget for the A8 anyway, it actually sells for less than €135.Building your own printer may make sense if you need different features (size...), but I can't see how you can beat the price of the A8 with a homebrew.If you can make attention to details (read labels...) it is definitely worth getting (and they provide more screws & nuts than what is needed)

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  • Doesn't it look a lot like https://www.instructables.com/Pringle-Can-MIDI-Drums/ ?

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  • I didn't think of it first, but it looks it's exactly what I was looking for to make the "father" for propeller moulds, as it's easily twistable and bendable, thanks!

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  • Double your strings and you get a mandolin (it actually looks a lot like a mandolin).. Leave it this way and you have a violin or a banjo, three instruments very popular here in Ireland.In any case, good job! Voted!

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  • ндогонят commented on GuhanN's instructable Growing Crystals!

    Actually, rock candy crystals can look a lot like quartz, depending how long you let them grow.

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  • There's probably more to do than using a PiZero as a webcam to IP adapter: an ESP8266 would do that better over WiFi.How about OpenCV on the PiZero to pre-process the pictures with shape and face recognition, movement tracking, and other fun stuff that really puts the Pi at use?

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      • 3D Printed Bionic Hand Skeleton
  • Voted! I love your writing style too, I'd vote a second time just for the LOLs.When you're 3d printing, a nice clean way of filing and getting your surfaces is a solution of acetone on a rag. it gives a nice polish look immediately (or a melted style if you used pure acetone, did I mention a "solution"?). That works very well when you're working these contact surfaces.About your design, how would you suggest to alter it so the angle between the phalanges bend to >120º instead of <90º? How would you implement lateral movement of the fingers (open hand) so the pinky can touch the index finger?Now, to make it Steve Austin's hand, I need motors. What kind of force or torque would you need to animate it with no load (considering all the elastic bands would be attache…

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    Voted! I love your writing style too, I'd vote a second time just for the LOLs.When you're 3d printing, a nice clean way of filing and getting your surfaces is a solution of acetone on a rag. it gives a nice polish look immediately (or a melted style if you used pure acetone, did I mention a "solution"?). That works very well when you're working these contact surfaces.About your design, how would you suggest to alter it so the angle between the phalanges bend to >120º instead of <90º? How would you implement lateral movement of the fingers (open hand) so the pinky can touch the index finger?Now, to make it Steve Austin's hand, I need motors. What kind of force or torque would you need to animate it with no load (considering all the elastic bands would be attached to pulleys to null the effect of the tension on the motors themselves)?

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  • Nice for long sleeves, but useless for T-shirts, there's a much faster and neater way to fold T-shirts in 1 move: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJEuEpj5Iqk

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  • Better hookup you RPi on a real monitor, a second-hand 17inch LCD with a DVI-D can be found for as little as 15EUR (with luck, it can be larger and/or cheaper), the cable HDMI to SATA is 2EUR on Wish, just add a 3Amp power supply for the Pi, a USB hub with external supply (hence 3Amps), a SATA hard disk, a USB to SATA adapter and a WiFi dongle, and you've got an entire Pi-based machine for less than the price of the LCD controller alone, how good is that?

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  • Not with a hangover! ;-)

    As a Frenchman, I have a clear preference for the "Full Irish" with Clonakilty (Co. Cork) black pudding and white pudding (both with seeds), rashers instead of streaked bacon, and I add chopped shallots or (Irish) red onions to the fry, plus a dash of vinegar or lemon juice depending on the mood. And I'm a coffee drinker.Also, making your own crispy hashbrowns is not too complicated and it's a real plus compared to the ready-made stuff: https://www.instructables.com/Hash-Browns-The-H...

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  • I don't have a USB on the Deek Robot, therefore I don't care at all about the ability to reprogram the USB-to-Serial chip ;-)I'm going to use the V-USB library (https://www.obdev.at/products/vusb/index.html) to get there, they already have MIDI Controllers with beautifully commented code, but they use D2 with PORTC commands so I'll have to move the LED somewhere else.I'll let you know how it works :-)

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  • Hi,I love the idea, and I'm on the verge of making it with 6 drums connected from A0 to A5 (using a Deek Robot with an ATMega328P, although I usually make my own Arduino compatible boards clocked at 20MHz). I'm going to power it through USB attached to the MacBook, so far so good. How would I do to send the TX back to the USB (and avoid the MIDI connection completely) so it's recognised as an autonomous USB device without the need of a MIDI adapter plugged in another USB port (I don't have so many ports...)?I'm voting for you anyway :-)Cheers

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