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26CommentsAether Wilds, AntarticaJoined January 5th, 2016
Graphic Artist, Gamer, Philosopher, Technician, Speaker, Coder
  • How to Coil Extension Cords with the "Shepherd's Knot"

    chord1kôrd/nounnoun: chord; plural noun: chords1. a group of (typically three or more) notes sounded together, as a basis of harmony."the triumphal opening chords"verbverb: chord; 3rd person present: chords; past tense: chorded; past participle: chorded; gerund or present participle: chording1. play, sing, or arrange notes in chords.

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  • AeSix commented on dreens's instructable Battery Eliminator2 years ago
    Battery Eliminator

    So, a few things:1) This shouldn't be used with high end / senstaive electronics - and definitely not with voltometers/multi-meaters/etc - the dirty power may ruin the equipment or give false output2) Using an AC/DC adapter designed for electronics (such as a power brick from a laptop) is a LOT safer for electronic devices.3) Using resistors, return to ground circuits and capacitors can help to clean up the power4) Use of a more stable material for the battery bulk would be better - using something that won't saturate with water is nearly a requirement, so wood is out and plastic is in. PVC pipes can be used to get a close-enough size match, with nuts tightly fitted into the pipe for bolts/machine screws to be threaded into. (The anode can be pushed in further the give the bolt head the...

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    So, a few things:1) This shouldn't be used with high end / senstaive electronics - and definitely not with voltometers/multi-meaters/etc - the dirty power may ruin the equipment or give false output2) Using an AC/DC adapter designed for electronics (such as a power brick from a laptop) is a LOT safer for electronic devices.3) Using resistors, return to ground circuits and capacitors can help to clean up the power4) Use of a more stable material for the battery bulk would be better - using something that won't saturate with water is nearly a requirement, so wood is out and plastic is in. PVC pipes can be used to get a close-enough size match, with nuts tightly fitted into the pipe for bolts/machine screws to be threaded into. (The anode can be pushed in further the give the bolt head the same depth as the edge of the pipe, with the diode sticking out a bit as batteries do) This also gives the potential to route the wires through the inside of the pipe to prevent the wires from being ripped-off.

    So, a few things:1) This shouldn't be used with high end / senstaive electronics - and definitely not with voltometers/multi-meaters/etc - the dirty power may ruin the equipment or give false output2) Using an AC/DC adapter designed for electronics (such as a power brick from a laptop) is a LOT safer for electronic devices.3) Using resistors, return to ground circuits and capacitors can help to clean up the power4) Use of a more stable material for the battery bulk would be better - using something that won't saturate with water is nearly a requirement, so wood is out and plastic is in. PVC pipes can be used to get a close-enough size match, with nuts tightly fitted into the pipe for bolts/machine screws to be threaded into. (The anode can be pushed in further the give the bolt head the...

    see more »

    So, a few things:1) This shouldn't be used with high end / senstaive electronics - and definitely not with voltometers/multi-meaters/etc - the dirty power may ruin the equipment or give false output2) Using an AC/DC adapter designed for electronics (such as a power brick from a laptop) is a LOT safer for electronic devices.3) Using resistors, return to ground circuits and capacitors can help to clean up the power4) Use of a more stable material for the battery bulk would be better - using something that won't saturate with water is nearly a requirement, so wood is out and plastic is in. PVC pipes can be used to get a close-enough size match, with nuts tightly fitted into the pipe for bolts/machine screws to be threaded into. (The anode can be pushed in further the give the bolt head the same depth as the edge of the pipe, with the diode sticking out a bit as batteries do) This also gives the potential to route the wires through the inside of the pipe to prevent the wires from being ripped-off.

    Actually, capacitors would work, as this is exactly what they were intended for.Just simply do the calculations to determine the voltage and uF to result with an appropriate end output.

    So, a few things:1) This shouldn't be used with high end / senstaive electronics - and definitely not with voltometers/multi-meaters/etc - the dirty power may ruin the equipment or give false output2) Using an AC/DC adapter designed for electronics (such as a power brick from a laptop) is a LOT safer for electronic devices.3) Using resistors, return to ground circuits and capacitors can help to clean up the power4) Use of a more stable material for the battery bulk would be better - using something that won't saturate with water is nearly a requirement, so wood is out and plastic is in. PVC pipes can be used to get a close-enough size match, with nuts tightly fitted into the pipe for bolts/machine screws to be threaded into. (The anode can be pushed in further the give the bolt head the...

    see more »

    So, a few things:1) This shouldn't be used with high end / senstaive electronics - and definitely not with voltometers/multi-meaters/etc - the dirty power may ruin the equipment or give false output2) Using an AC/DC adapter designed for electronics (such as a power brick from a laptop) is a LOT safer for electronic devices.3) Using resistors, return to ground circuits and capacitors can help to clean up the power4) Use of a more stable material for the battery bulk would be better - using something that won't saturate with water is nearly a requirement, so wood is out and plastic is in. PVC pipes can be used to get a close-enough size match, with nuts tightly fitted into the pipe for bolts/machine screws to be threaded into. (The anode can be pushed in further the give the bolt head the same depth as the edge of the pipe, with the diode sticking out a bit as batteries do) This also gives the potential to route the wires through the inside of the pipe to prevent the wires from being ripped-off.

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  • Pull Wooden Fence Posts Set In Concrete WITH NO DIGGING!

    Awesome idea. Implementation is a bit sketchy, but that can be improved upon per-builder's desire! I might add a pivoted center piece that could swing down to become the fulcrum, as opposed to the cinder block. Iron pipe with a wall flange as the foot might be enough for the fulcrum leg. Also, I could see using some kind of toothed wedging mechanism on the end, so not to have to drill holes in the posts. Combine with a strip of heavy rubber, and it can be used with galvanized fence posts as well. Would be great for re-usability, especially with the metal posts.

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  • DIY Life-Size Remote Control (transparent) BB-8

    There's a much better version built with a guineepig ball. It actually moves in multiple directions as well... oh, and I think it was made by a 12 y/o.

    Then you've not seen some of the better ones on here...

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  • AeSix commented on SpecificLove's instructable 10 Life Hacks with Carabiners2 years ago
    10 Life Hacks with Carabiners

    Yes! This.Also, that loop on the end of most leashes - that can be put around the walker's wrist, with hand through the hole grasping the base of the loop on the leash. This gives plenty of control, you know, for those dogs that are still being trained to walk nice, or for those dogs that do everything perfectly - until they see a squirrel. The best part is - not free bus rides if your dog does get that stupid, because it can be easily released from the wrist and hand in the case of a dire emergency. Like dog dragging the walker into traffic. Sorry, but if it's a choice between it's life and mine, damn straight I'm letting the suicidal mutt go.

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  • AeSix commented on dave5201's instructable How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer2 years ago
    How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer

    That's not entirly accurate about the clamp. There are plastic clamps which pop into the hole from the inside. This can be done over the wire, so it's not in the way - or it can be pried open slightly with a screwdriver to allow reverse insertion of the wire. So, neither box needs to be outside of the wall to accomplish this. This is also code compliant everywhere I've ever been. (I've been a lot of places)I've never once seen any where that there be two runs for every outlet in a kitchen. I would really appreciate a link to a specific case, so I can study it. A kitchen with 6 outlets would require 12 runs, and consequently 12 breakers. This would add to the cost of the kitchen tremendously - Especially if the kitchen and breaker are on opposite sides of the house. I honestly feel you ...

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    That's not entirly accurate about the clamp. There are plastic clamps which pop into the hole from the inside. This can be done over the wire, so it's not in the way - or it can be pried open slightly with a screwdriver to allow reverse insertion of the wire. So, neither box needs to be outside of the wall to accomplish this. This is also code compliant everywhere I've ever been. (I've been a lot of places)I've never once seen any where that there be two runs for every outlet in a kitchen. I would really appreciate a link to a specific case, so I can study it. A kitchen with 6 outlets would require 12 runs, and consequently 12 breakers. This would add to the cost of the kitchen tremendously - Especially if the kitchen and breaker are on opposite sides of the house. I honestly feel you have either misspoke, have no idea what you're talking about, or live in an area where Fascism is ruling the boards. But again, please reply with a specific case so I can study it.Depending on the age of the house, "getting away" with a non-gfci outlet under counter isn't an issue. I've lived in houses built in the late 70s and early 80s, where under counter outlets were a thing, and none were GFCI. Normally these were for garbage disposals, trash compactors, refridgerator, etc. It is still advisable to have one, however a GFCI breaker at the panel would also serve the purpose, and protect the entire circuit.

    +1

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