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AllenW41

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  • AllenW41 commented on kaizenbob's instructable LED Christmas Light Repair3 years ago
    LED Christmas Light Repair

    I don't know about the icicle lights. If a whole section is bad, I think it's natural to suspect a wiring fault, rather than the mass death of individual LEDs. But you did see the faint glow--that's some confirmation that it may be helpful, IF there is power to a section in the first place.I am disappointed in LED lights--they seem not ready for outdoor, unsheltered, winter use. You're presenting a problem that's over my head. I'm not an electrical engineer--I'm just someone who is sharing what they noticed (the lack of a faint blue glow on bad LEDs.)

    If an entire section is out (no blue glow on ANY LEDs,) I have to wonder if that is a wiring problem rather than individual LEDs. Or, it could be that the thick covers are obscuring the glow.

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  • AllenW41 commented on kaizenbob's instructable LED Christmas Light Repair3 years ago
    LED Christmas Light Repair

    The plastic cover might come off--they do even on the smaller lights I was using, although not always easily. There should be an LED in there, somewhere. Let me know. I've had good luck with the C6 type lights strings, I think they are protected by the larger covers.

    Lisa, Sorry to hear that. The C6 lights have a faceted plastic cover. The lights I was using have a clear, small and thin cover. You bring up a flaw in my scheme. I have not tried this except on the lights I was using. From an ad for C6 lights: "The decorative, faceted lens diffuses the light creating bright attractive colors perfect for any indoor or outdoor displays."

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  • AllenW41 commented on kaizenbob's instructable LED Christmas Light Repair3 years ago
    LED Christmas Light Repair

    Test.

    I accidentally came across a solution to finding which are bad and which are good LED's in a string. I think so, but, check it out and comment. Plug in the LED string. It doesn't matter if it or the section in question lights or not. Now, examine in a darkened room or dark shade. There will be a faint (and I mean FAINT) blue glow--a tiny dot--in every good LED. Bad LED's will have no faint blue dot of light. Let me emphasize the words 'faint' and 'tiny' again. Let me know if this proves out to you. For me, no-blue-glow correlated with LED's that were bad. In each case, one leg of the LED had broken off (seems like a sucky material design mistake.) My strings were two quality strings of 100 lights purchased at Costco, and they made it through last season. Winding on a spool for storage p...

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    I accidentally came across a solution to finding which are bad and which are good LED's in a string. I think so, but, check it out and comment. Plug in the LED string. It doesn't matter if it or the section in question lights or not. Now, examine in a darkened room or dark shade. There will be a faint (and I mean FAINT) blue glow--a tiny dot--in every good LED. Bad LED's will have no faint blue dot of light. Let me emphasize the words 'faint' and 'tiny' again. Let me know if this proves out to you. For me, no-blue-glow correlated with LED's that were bad. In each case, one leg of the LED had broken off (seems like a sucky material design mistake.) My strings were two quality strings of 100 lights purchased at Costco, and they made it through last season. Winding on a spool for storage probably disturbed the delicate LED leads. I was only able to repair one of those strings where I was able to find the one (1) bad LED and the whole thing LIT! The other had far too many bad LED's--far more than I had replacements for. If this proves out, all that I humbly ask is that it forever be known as The Allen Whitlock Method. :-) (Book available on Amazon.)

    An easy (2 minute) way to avoid having to cut/splice, solder--if it comes to that:Find a twist-tie. With scissors or wire cutter, clamp gently and strip off the plastic. You will be left with a section of a nice, thin, malleable wire. AFTER UNPLUGGING THE LIGHT STRING: Remove the complete bad plug from the socket. Remove the LED (or bulb) from its holder. Make a 'U' shape from your piece of wire and insert, upside down into the holder so that--when inserted again--it will bridge between the contacts. Your two wire ends should be located where the LED (or bulb) leads were. Cut to size. Put the bad LED (or bulb) back and any cover it might have had.This has the same effect as cutting and splicing the wires and carries the same cautions as noted for that method under this topic. I'm not an...

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    An easy (2 minute) way to avoid having to cut/splice, solder--if it comes to that:Find a twist-tie. With scissors or wire cutter, clamp gently and strip off the plastic. You will be left with a section of a nice, thin, malleable wire. AFTER UNPLUGGING THE LIGHT STRING: Remove the complete bad plug from the socket. Remove the LED (or bulb) from its holder. Make a 'U' shape from your piece of wire and insert, upside down into the holder so that--when inserted again--it will bridge between the contacts. Your two wire ends should be located where the LED (or bulb) leads were. Cut to size. Put the bad LED (or bulb) back and any cover it might have had.This has the same effect as cutting and splicing the wires and carries the same cautions as noted for that method under this topic. I'm not an electrical engineer, proceed at your own risk. If this proves out, all that I humbly ask is that it forever be known as The Allen Whitlock Easy-Peezie Wire-Splice Method. :-) (Fiction book available on Amazon.)

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