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  • Using 433MHz Remote Controlled Switches on Arduino

    this is the remote i havehttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/433-Mhz-Wireless-R...you use it to teach these relays a codehttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/Maytir-10A-1Channe...https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Smart-Home-DC-12V-...but the remote only has 4 distinct frequencies or codes, one for each buttonso it can only operate 4 relays without interfecencein the press one for on and once for off more or momentary mode or2 relays in the one button for on and one button for off modeso if i want to use more relays then i would need to buy more remotes but i do not need remotes because i have a universal IR remotethat can learn these remotes so after they are learned by the universal remote i no longer need them, but the universal remote can not generate it's own unique codes/frequenciesi w...

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    this is the remote i havehttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/433-Mhz-Wireless-R...you use it to teach these relays a codehttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/Maytir-10A-1Channe...https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Smart-Home-DC-12V-...but the remote only has 4 distinct frequencies or codes, one for each buttonso it can only operate 4 relays without interfecencein the press one for on and once for off more or momentary mode or2 relays in the one button for on and one button for off modeso if i want to use more relays then i would need to buy more remotes but i do not need remotes because i have a universal IR remotethat can learn these remotes so after they are learned by the universal remote i no longer need them, but the universal remote can not generate it's own unique codes/frequenciesi want to be able to just buy relays and not more remotes so i want to know if i can sample the remote and then see what sort of range it operates in , then alter the sample a little so it is still able to be learned by the relay and the universal IR remote but be a different seperate code/frequency ,and play it back to teach the relays and the universal remote that code/frequency so i don't need to buy a remote for each relay just to get new codes/frequencies

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  • Using 433MHz Remote Controlled Switches on Arduino

    well how else would you go about generating a code that could be learned by one of those quiachip 433MHZ relays? wouldn't you have to to at least scan something it can learn 1st to get in the ballpark of what kind of signal you need?how could i generate different FQ's to use with these relays besides to keep on buying new remotes just for the FQ's ?i use these relays with a broadlink RM pro ,so once i teach the relay the code for the remote and then teach it to the RM pro in the econtrol app i don't ever use the remotes they just sit in a drawer , i would like to be able to just buy the relays and not have to buy a remote every time i need a unique FQ to operate somehting

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  • Using 433MHz Remote Controlled Switches on Arduino

    you said the receiver has 4 pins , 2 data pins but which one do we use or does it matter? you said some libraries use A0 and other use D2 on the arduino end so what if you connect one date pin from the receiver to D2 and the other to A0? where are there data 2 pins anyways , are they different?i am looking to use thesehttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/Maytir-10A-1Channe...https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Smart-Home-DC-12V-...i already have a few which i had to purchase these remote for to teach them the codeshttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/433-Mhz-Wireless-R...so would it be possible for me to use the arduino and RF RX to sniff the FQ from the remote then alter it and play it back to with the arduino and the TX to teach other relays new codes to that i a can just buy relays withou...

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    you said the receiver has 4 pins , 2 data pins but which one do we use or does it matter? you said some libraries use A0 and other use D2 on the arduino end so what if you connect one date pin from the receiver to D2 and the other to A0? where are there data 2 pins anyways , are they different?i am looking to use thesehttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/Maytir-10A-1Channe...https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Smart-Home-DC-12V-...i already have a few which i had to purchase these remote for to teach them the codeshttps://www.aliexpress.com/item/433-Mhz-Wireless-R...so would it be possible for me to use the arduino and RF RX to sniff the FQ from the remote then alter it and play it back to with the arduino and the TX to teach other relays new codes to that i a can just buy relays without needingot buy a new remote ust fo the FQ's ?

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  • AndreaM235 commented on Grathio's instructable Choosing The Resistor To Use With LEDs3 years ago
    Choosing The Resistor To Use With LEDs

    how exact does it really have to be anyways?i mean is it just guidance for the minimum value?as long as you use at least that value you are good and it is ok to go over right?i have 10 LED string that are not using any resistor in themalso what if you wire a bunch or LED's in parallel do you just multiply the vales by how many LED's you are using then wire all the anode leads together and all the cathode leads together then put the resistor in series between the anodes and the positve power supply lead?

    ok so how come i bought a set of led fairy lights from the dollar store and there is no resistor in them, there are 10 white LED's wired in parallel with a battery box , in the box is just a switch and holder for 2 AA batteries ,no resistor anywherethey are small LED's with a flat top , last year i cut apart a string of them for a halloween project and confirmed there was no resistor,i used an AC to DC power supply to power them instead of the battery box with an output of 3.3v DC from an old sony discman, not sure the mA current outputi also plugged the power supply into a plug in electronic lamp dimmer the slide kind with a triac inside and dimmed it a little ,some of the LED's i guess burnt out after a while after about a few weeks or so and got dim, not completely burnt out ,but dim...

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    ok so how come i bought a set of led fairy lights from the dollar store and there is no resistor in them, there are 10 white LED's wired in parallel with a battery box , in the box is just a switch and holder for 2 AA batteries ,no resistor anywherethey are small LED's with a flat top , last year i cut apart a string of them for a halloween project and confirmed there was no resistor,i used an AC to DC power supply to power them instead of the battery box with an output of 3.3v DC from an old sony discman, not sure the mA current outputi also plugged the power supply into a plug in electronic lamp dimmer the slide kind with a triac inside and dimmed it a little ,some of the LED's i guess burnt out after a while after about a few weeks or so and got dim, not completely burnt out ,but dimmed ,i also have a halloween wreath pre-lit with similar LED's but yellow orangish,the LED's are clear but emit an orange yellow light,in the battery box for that there is a resistor and it also runs on 2 AA batteries but i power it with the same power supply setup ,i wire it through the battery box so i use the included resistor it is wired in parallel with the other fairy lightsso how come the dollar store fairy lights have no resistor but the wreath does?why do the fairy string from the dollar store not have resistors?i bought some white LED's from ebay (clear but emit light with a bluish hue)they say VF 3.2-3.4 IV 12000-14000 , not sure what the 2nd thing isi plan on using the same power supply setup, i have some 270ohm 1/2 watt resistorsso will i be ok if i wire say 12 LED's in parallel ,and use one of these resistorsin series between the power leads and + terminal of the power supply?the wreath i have has only one resistor in the battery box so i assume they are only using 1 resistor for the whole string of about 20 LED's, but i see that on another site it is recommended to use one resistor for each LED, but i if use one resistorcan i just multiply the value for each of the LED resistor values i get?for example when i calculate what resistor value i need using a vf of 3.2 and a power supply voltage 3.3 i get recommended to use a 5 ohm resistor ,so if want to use 12 LED's wired in parallel then can i just use one 60 ohm resistor in series between all the positive led leads wired together and the + of the power supply?instead of wiring a 5 ohm resistor in series with each individual LED? and would a 270 ohm be overkill or should i look for a 60 ohm resistor or just use more led's? i mean will i get dimmer LED's if i use too large of a resistor value? is it just important to use a resistor that is big enough to not fry the LED's and then it is ok to over that by a little?does the recommended resistor vale just mean at lest that value or higher it does not have to be exact does it if we are talking in terms of going over not under right?

    ok so how come i bought a set of led fairy lights from the dollar store and there is no resistor in them, there are 10 white LED's wired in parallel with a battery box , in the box is just a switch and holder for 2 AA batteries ,no resistor anywherethey are small LED's with a flat top , last year i cut apart a string of them for a halloween project and confirmed there was no resistor,i used an AC to DC power supply to power them instead of the battery box with an output of 3.3v DC from an old sony discman, not sure the mA current outputi also plugged the power supply into a plug in electronic lamp dimmer the slide kind with a triac inside and dimmed it a little ,some of the LED's i guess burnt out after a while after about a few weeks or so and got dim, not completely burnt out ,but dim...

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    ok so how come i bought a set of led fairy lights from the dollar store and there is no resistor in them, there are 10 white LED's wired in parallel with a battery box , in the box is just a switch and holder for 2 AA batteries ,no resistor anywherethey are small LED's with a flat top , last year i cut apart a string of them for a halloween project and confirmed there was no resistor,i used an AC to DC power supply to power them instead of the battery box with an output of 3.3v DC from an old sony discman, not sure the mA current outputi also plugged the power supply into a plug in electronic lamp dimmer the slide kind with a triac inside and dimmed it a little ,some of the LED's i guess burnt out after a while after about a few weeks or so and got dim, not completely burnt out ,but dimmed ,i also have a halloween wreath pre-lit with similar LED's but yellow orangish,the LED's are clear but emit an orange yellow light,in the battery box for that there is a resistor and it also runs AA batteries,3 of them but i power it with the same power supply setup ,i wire it through the battery box so i use the included resistor it is wired in parallel with the other fairy lightsso how come the dollar store fairy lights have no resistor but the wreath does?why do the fairy string from the dollar store not have resistors?i bought some white LED's from ebay (clear but emit light with a bluish hue)they say VF 3.2-3.4 IV 12000-14000 , not sure what the 2nd thing isi plan on using the same power supply setup, i have some 270ohm 1/2 watt resistorsso will i be ok if i wire say 12 LED's in parallel ,and use one of these resistorsin series between the power leads and + terminal of the power supply?the wreath i have has only one resistor in the battery box so i assume they are only using 1 resistor for the whole string of about 20 LED's, but i see that on another site it is recommended to use one resistor for each LED, but i if use one resistorcan i just multiply the value for each of the LED resistor values i get?for example when i calculate what resistor value i need using a vf of 3.2 and a power supply voltage 3.3 i get recommended to use a 5 ohm resistor ,so if want to use 12 LED's wired in parallel then can i just use one 60 ohm resistor in series between all the positive led leads wired together and the + of the power supply?instead of wiring a 5 ohm resistor in series with each individual LED? and would a 270 ohm be overkill or should i look for a 60 ohm resistor or just use more led's? i mean will i get dimmer LED's if i use too large of a resistor value? is it just important to use a resistor that is big enough to not fry the LED's and then it is ok to over that by a little?does the recommended resistor vale just mean at lest that value or higher it does not have to be exact does it if we are talking in terms of going over not under right?

    ok so how come i bought a set of led fairy lights from the dollar store there is no resistor in them, there are 10 white LED's wired in parallel with a battery box , in the box is just a switch and holder for 2 AA batteries ,no resistor anywherethey are small LED's with a flat top , last year i cut apart a string of them for a halloween project and confirmed there was no resistor,i used an AC to DC power supply to power them instead of the battery box with an output of 3.3v DC from and old sony discman, not sure the mA current outputi also plugged the power supply into a plug in electric lamp dimmer the slide kind with a triac inside ,some of the LED's i guess burnt out after a while after about a few weeks and got dim, not completely out ,but dimmed ,i also have a wreath pre-lit with...

    see more »

    ok so how come i bought a set of led fairy lights from the dollar store there is no resistor in them, there are 10 white LED's wired in parallel with a battery box , in the box is just a switch and holder for 2 AA batteries ,no resistor anywherethey are small LED's with a flat top , last year i cut apart a string of them for a halloween project and confirmed there was no resistor,i used an AC to DC power supply to power them instead of the battery box with an output of 3.3v DC from and old sony discman, not sure the mA current outputi also plugged the power supply into a plug in electric lamp dimmer the slide kind with a triac inside ,some of the LED's i guess burnt out after a while after about a few weeks and got dim, not completely out ,but dimmed ,i also have a wreath pre-lit with similar LED's but yellow orangish,the LED's are clear but emit an orange yellow light,in the battery box for that there is a resistor and it also runs on 2 AA batteriesso how come the dollar store fairy lights have no resistor but the wreath does?why do the fairy string from the dollar store not have resistors?i bought some white LED's from ebay (clear but emit light with a bluish hue)they say VF 3.2-3.4 IV 12000-14000 , not sure what the 2nd thing isi plan on using the same power supply setup, i have some 270ohm 1/2 watt resistorsso will i be ok if i wire say 12 LED's in parallel ,and use one of these resistorsin series between the power leads and + terminal of the power supply?the wreath i have has only one resistor in the battery box so i assume they are only using 1 resistor for the whole string of about 20 LED's, but i see that on another site it is recommended to use one resistor for each LED, but i if use one resistorcan i just multiply the value for each of the LED resistor values i get?for example when i calculate what resistor value i need using a vf of 3.2 and a power supply voltage 3.3 i get recommended to use a 5 ohm resistor ,so if want to use 12 LED's wired in parallel then can i just use one 60 ohm resistor in series between all the positive led leads wired together and the + of the power supply?instead of wiring a 5 ohm resistor in series with each individual LED? and would a 270 ohm be overkill or should i look for a 60 ohm resistor or just use more led's? i mean will i get dimmer LED's if i use too large of a resistor value? is it just important to use a resistor that is big enough to not fry the LED's and then it is ok to over that by a little?does the recommended resistor vale just mean at lest that value or higher it does not have to be exact does it if we are talking in terms of going over not under right?

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