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  • Beekeeper commented on jbutterfield's instructable Brick Oven1 year ago
    Brick Oven

    Excellent work. I made a similar oven http://www.setimanitoba.org/home/2017/10/4/making-a-wood-fired-outdoor-pizza-oven.html and wish I had used fire bricks for the dome. Otherwise my ideas might inspire a few people.

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  • Sourdough Starter and Bread Recipe

    This is a very comprehensive sourdoughInstructable, so well done and thank you for taking the time and trouble to doit. First, a couple of questions: one,is it preferable to use non-iodized salt? In cheese making non-iodized salt is used because the iodine affects thecheese bacteria. Second, does usingmetal bowls or metal spoons affect the sourdough? I have heard it recommended to not use metal,but my well water contains a lot of iron especially as well as other metals.Over the years I have tried makingsourdough bread without much success but recently I was given some more starterso have tried again. My first batch ofsourdough bread was fantastic and just as bread should be, but my second andthird batches were disappointments. The gluten just wouldn't develop asusual, with the resu...

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    This is a very comprehensive sourdoughInstructable, so well done and thank you for taking the time and trouble to doit. First, a couple of questions: one,is it preferable to use non-iodized salt? In cheese making non-iodized salt is used because the iodine affects thecheese bacteria. Second, does usingmetal bowls or metal spoons affect the sourdough? I have heard it recommended to not use metal,but my well water contains a lot of iron especially as well as other metals.Over the years I have tried makingsourdough bread without much success but recently I was given some more starterso have tried again. My first batch ofsourdough bread was fantastic and just as bread should be, but my second andthird batches were disappointments. The gluten just wouldn't develop asusual, with the result that it did not rise very well, though the flavour wasgood. After thinking about it and remembering what I had read over theyears, I believe I have solved the mystery - my mystery anyway. My fourthbatch is again excellent just like the first. It had such amazing glutendevelopment that it was even difficult to shape the loaves! So, what isthe difference between my batches 1 & 4 and 2 & 3? When I received the first small amount ofstarter I added ¼ cup of flour and ¼ cup water morning and evening for 2 daysin order to build up the volume. Then I made the bread and it wasexcellent. Meanwhile I continued feeding the starter until I had built upa good quantity that went into the fridge until the next batch. When Istarted batch two I fed the starter with 1/4 cup flour and water as usual, theevening before and again the next morning, making my dough in the evening, butthe gluten just would not develop regardless of how much kneading I did.The starter is a symbiotic mix of yeast andan acid forming bacteria. If fed frequently the yeast predominates,whereas if fed infrequently the bacteria take over forming a very acid starter. Many people add vinegar or lemon juice to pastry with the sole purpose ofpreventing gluten development, so it is hardly surprising that an overly acidstarter will affect gluten in sourdough bread. I had built up the volumeof my starter but I was still only adding 1/4 cup of each flour and water. In other words the proportion of fresh flour to what was in alreadypresent was quite small and this allowed the bacteria to predominate and createan excessively acid starter. Perhapsthis is the reason some instructions for maintaining one’s starter is to keepthrowing (or giving) away half of it, though no reason for doing so is evergiven.So, for batch four, when I took my largejar of starter from the fridge in the evening there was a clear watery layer ontop that was very acidic. I poured this down the sink and then pouredabout ½ cup of the starter itself into a clean jar and ‘fed’ it with ¼ cupflour and water. I fed it again the next morning and a third time midafternoon. By suppertime I had to stir the starter as it was bubbling sofuriously that it was likely to overflow the jar. At bedtime I made up mydough with 6 cups flour and ¾ cup starter plus water & salt, formed it intoone homogenous lump (no real kneading) and put the bowl inside a large plasticbag overnight to prevent it drying out. In the morning the glutendevelopment was fantastic such that, as mentioned above, I had difficultyshaping the loaves!!In spite of the above, I have to say thatthe poorly risen bread made from excessively acid starter, undoubtedly has amuch better flavour. So, is there amiddle ground somewhere?

    This has been my problem for years. Sourdough is a symbiotic relationship between wild yeast and bacteria. The yeast creates the gas bubbles that rise the bread and the bacteria makes acid that gives the bread its characteristic flavour. I have discovered that if you let your starter get too acidic, the yeast doesn't like it and the bread doesn't rise very well, but the flavour is fantastic. The other thing is people add acid to pastry (vinegar or lemon juice) to stop the gluten developing and to stop the pastry getting leathery. So when you let your starter get too acidic it is hard to develop the gluten. Combine the two and your bread doesn't rise very well and isn't good chewy bread, but it tastes good. If you build up the volume of your starter by adding, say ¼ cup flo...

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    This has been my problem for years. Sourdough is a symbiotic relationship between wild yeast and bacteria. The yeast creates the gas bubbles that rise the bread and the bacteria makes acid that gives the bread its characteristic flavour. I have discovered that if you let your starter get too acidic, the yeast doesn't like it and the bread doesn't rise very well, but the flavour is fantastic. The other thing is people add acid to pastry (vinegar or lemon juice) to stop the gluten developing and to stop the pastry getting leathery. So when you let your starter get too acidic it is hard to develop the gluten. Combine the two and your bread doesn't rise very well and isn't good chewy bread, but it tastes good. If you build up the volume of your starter by adding, say ¼ cup flour and ¼ cup water every day for a few days, and don't throw any away, you will end up with a large volume of starter, yet you are only feeding it with a relatively small amount of new flour. Under these circumstances the bacteria tend to predominate and the starter gets more acidic. On the other hand if you have a small amount of starter and add a relatively large amount of flour/water, the yeast predominate and you get a very bubbly starter and a good bread, but with minimal sourdough flavour. There is probably a middle ground somewhere and I expect a pH meter would be required to find it.Good luck.

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  • Beekeeper's entry Spicy English Tea Bread is a winner in the Bread Challenge 2017 contest 1 year ago
  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Spicy English Tea Bread1 year ago
    Spicy English Tea Bread

    Not sure exactly what you mean about 'resurrecting' your bread from the freezer. Just to make it clear, you pipe the flour paste crosses on the buns after they have risen and immediately before you put them in the oven. The point is that the bun dough goes brown because it contains sugar (or malt in this case) and caramelizes whereas the flour paste, having no sugar, stays white.Incidentally I use a light malt. It sounded like you have a dark malt that may be used for dark beers. The colour of what I use is pretty much as in the photo in step 1. As for the malt bread recipe I'll add it below. As you will see it is very similar to the Spicy English Tea Bread. And as you will see it is mostly white flour because the malt bread I grew up with was all white flour and that seems to be...

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    Not sure exactly what you mean about 'resurrecting' your bread from the freezer. Just to make it clear, you pipe the flour paste crosses on the buns after they have risen and immediately before you put them in the oven. The point is that the bun dough goes brown because it contains sugar (or malt in this case) and caramelizes whereas the flour paste, having no sugar, stays white.Incidentally I use a light malt. It sounded like you have a dark malt that may be used for dark beers. The colour of what I use is pretty much as in the photo in step 1. As for the malt bread recipe I'll add it below. As you will see it is very similar to the Spicy English Tea Bread. And as you will see it is mostly white flour because the malt bread I grew up with was all white flour and that seems to be the traditional way.Malt Bread1. Before going to bed, in a BIG bowl put:3 cups whiteall purpose flour2 tsp instantyeast3 cups warmwaterStir well and cover with plastic or a goodlid and leave in a warm place.2. Next morning butter 2 large bread tins.3. To the overnightbatter (commonly called a sponge or poolish) add:3 tbl dark brown sugar1/3 cup malt extract (this is a thick brown syrup-like substanceavailable from beer & wine making stores)Stir to dissolvethe brown sugar (or stir and wait a bit & then stir again etc).4. When the sugar is dissolved add: (pre-mixed)2 cups whiteall purpose flour1 cup wholewheat flour1 tsp salt1½ tbl oliveoil1+ cups raisinsand work to a decent dough.5. Return dough to the bowl, cover and leave for 30 mins in a warm place to allow gluten todevelop naturally.6. Knead (minimal required), divide into twopieces, shape and put in tins to rise.7. When risen bake 45 mins at 375 degrees F / 190 degrees CNote: 1). Another ½ cup of flour (or even more) may be necessary depending onthe absorbency of your flour and humidity. 2). It is normal tobrush the top of the loaf immediately it comes out of the oven with a syrupmade from milk and white sugar.tsp = tea spoon / 5mltbl = Tablespoon / 15ml1 cup =240ml approx

    Wow - your buns look mouthwateringly delicious and thank you for your lovely feedback. This is my first Instructable and it is so satisfying to get such positive comments. You are right - I have neglected to include buttering the bread pans in the instructions, and I will correct that omission right away. Not sure about oiling the bowl though as I never do that.My bread baking book gives a recipe for the Hot Cross Bun crosses which is: 50gms white flour, 1gm baking powder, 5 gms oil, 50gms water. Pipe the mixture on just before you put the buns in the oven. A small plastic bag with the corner snipped off will do. My book also says in medieval days the cross was to repel any evil spirits that might infect the bread but after the Reformation such practices were considered 'popish' (...

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    Wow - your buns look mouthwateringly delicious and thank you for your lovely feedback. This is my first Instructable and it is so satisfying to get such positive comments. You are right - I have neglected to include buttering the bread pans in the instructions, and I will correct that omission right away. Not sure about oiling the bowl though as I never do that.My bread baking book gives a recipe for the Hot Cross Bun crosses which is: 50gms white flour, 1gm baking powder, 5 gms oil, 50gms water. Pipe the mixture on just before you put the buns in the oven. A small plastic bag with the corner snipped off will do. My book also says in medieval days the cross was to repel any evil spirits that might infect the bread but after the Reformation such practices were considered 'popish' (in England anyway), but the cross has remained as a symbol for the Easter bun.I also have a recipe for malt bread which I could give you if you like as no doubt you have lots of malt left over.

    The recipe looks a bit of a muddle in the comment but when I typed it out it was all perfectly spaced and everything, and then when I clicked to send it, the text got all mixed up!! Anyway I guess you can understand it. Good luck.David

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  • Beekeeper's entry Spicy English Tea Bread is a finalist in the Bread Challenge 2017 contest 1 year ago
  • Live Edge River Coffee Table | How to Build

    Very nice project and video. I wish I had some of your tools!I make model airplanes and we often drill and tap holes to bolt the wings on. After tapping the threads we run superglue in the hole which hardens up the wood, and when dry we run the tap through the hole again. It makes a huge difference.

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  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Good Healthy Every-day Bread1 year ago
    Good Healthy Every-day Bread

    hi Dacoco.Here are the results of my experiment:Lemon Juice Staling Test.I made two identical separate batches ofbread using, in each batch, a total of 3 cups of flour and 1½ cups of waterplus 1 tsp yeast, ½ tsp salt, ¼ cup sunflower seeds and ¼ cup ground flax. I did my usual overnight poolish with half ofthe flour and all the water + the yeast. In the morning I added 1 tsp of lemon juice to one of the batches, then therest of the ingredients and worked them minimally to a decent even ball ofdough. Then I returned the dough to their respectivebowls and put them in my warm place for 30 minutes to let the glutendevelop. Both batches appearedidentical. Then I shaped the loaves andput them to rise. After roughly an hourboth again appeared identical so I bak...

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    hi Dacoco.Here are the results of my experiment:Lemon Juice Staling Test.I made two identical separate batches ofbread using, in each batch, a total of 3 cups of flour and 1½ cups of waterplus 1 tsp yeast, ½ tsp salt, ¼ cup sunflower seeds and ¼ cup ground flax. I did my usual overnight poolish with half ofthe flour and all the water + the yeast. In the morning I added 1 tsp of lemon juice to one of the batches, then therest of the ingredients and worked them minimally to a decent even ball ofdough. Then I returned the dough to their respectivebowls and put them in my warm place for 30 minutes to let the glutendevelop. Both batches appearedidentical. Then I shaped the loaves andput them to rise. After roughly an hourboth again appeared identical so I baked them – side-by-side in the centre ofthe oven.Visually there was no difference betweenthe two loaves after baking.When cooled down I cut the loaves in halfand at this time I tasted a thin slice of each to see if there were any obviousdifferences in taste or texture. Theredidn’t seem to be any difference in the flavour as they were both the same tome and certainly there was no taste of lemon.Then I put the two halves in separateplastic bags in my bread drawer in the kitchen and left them for a couple ofdays before beginning a daily test. After 48 hours a test of a thin slice ofeach loaf showed no difference between the two.After 3 days – no discernable difference.After 4 days – again, no discernabledifference. The mouth feel of both isgetting quite dry, but some chewiness was restored in both after toasting.After 5 days – same again: no discernabledifference.After 6 days - same again: no discernabledifference. At this time I decided to end the test asit was clear to me that adding lemon juice did not slow the staling process.

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  • Beekeeper commented on shapespeare's instructable Metric Bread1 year ago
    Metric Bread

    You don't need sugar in bread because there is a natural enzyme in wheat and thus in flour, called diastase that, in the presence of water, converts the starch in flour to sugar for the yeast to work on. You also don't need to proof the yeast unless you are using fresh yeast that has been sitting around in your fridge for a few weeks. Fresh yeast is a damp putty-like crumbly solid (a bit like crumbly cheese) that has a shelf life of about two weeks. If it is older than two weeks, checking it by proofing it in a little water with some sugar will satisfy you that the yeast hasn't died of old age. I always use fast acting dehydrated yeast and just add it in with the flour, and between batches I store it in the freezer as the author recommends.

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  • Beekeeper's instructable Good Healthy Every-day Bread's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Good Healthy Every-day Bread
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      10 comments
  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Good Healthy Every-day Bread1 year ago
    Good Healthy Every-day Bread

    OK, I'll try it so keep tuned. Maybe later this week. Where are you? I'm in Canada.David

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  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Spicy English Tea Bread1 year ago
    Spicy English Tea Bread

    Yes. I make my own yogourt all the time - every week anyway - and find it perfect for that. I mix up a litre of milk + starter and pop it in the old fridge overnight and voila, by morning I have a litre of yogourt. I've also used it as an incubator for hatching leafcutter bees but that is another story.

    Getting comments like yours makes creating Instrucables so worth while. Thank you. Bad luck with the fibromyalgia and I hope you can manage this almost no-knead method. Incidentally, I put a chair next to my oven to make it easier to get things in and out without having to bend over - bad back. Did you look at my other Instructable here? https://www.instructables.com/id/Good-Healthy-Every-day-Bread And a vote in the bread competition would be nice.

    Yes (and no). As I say at the bottom of the ingredients list (Step 1) you could use just 1 extra tablespoon of brown sugar instead of the malt and you will have a very nice spicy bread but not quite the same as if you had used malt. Don't use molasses as that is a different thing altogether. For some reason malt gives a very nice soft texture and flavour to bread.

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  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Good Healthy Every-day Bread1 year ago
    Good Healthy Every-day Bread

    Maybe next time I make bread I'll experiment and see if it really makes any difference. One loaf with lemon juice and one without, then store them side-by-side and see if there is any difference. How much per loaf did your dad say to add? Give me a couple of weeks and then check here for the answer.As a matter of interest previously I have tried to make bread using Heinz Tomato Sauce that according to the label contains red ripe tomatoes, salt, citric acid, red bell pepper powder, dextrose, natural flavouring and spice. The idea was to get a pink spicy peppery bread, but the yeast didn't like it and it wouldn't rise. I think it was too acidic with the citric acid and tomatoes.

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  • Beekeeper commented on makendo's instructable Laser-powered Light Saber1 year ago
    Laser-powered Light Saber

    Here in Canada we recently had a case of someone pointing a laser at rescue helicopter while it was taking someone to hospital and practically blinded the pilot. In the wrong hands this light sabre could be fatal for airplanes and numerous passengers flying in them. Or have I missed something about the range of these lasers?

    Here in Canada we recently had a case of someone pointing a laser at rescue helicopter while it was taking someone to hospital and practically blinded the pilot. In the wrong hands this light sabre could be fatal for airplanes and numerous passengers flying in them. Or have I missed something about the range of these lasers?

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  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Good Healthy Every-day Bread1 year ago
    Good Healthy Every-day Bread

    The only ingredient that there could be any doubt over is the type of yeast I use so it seemed a photo would make it clear. Lots of people like to proof their yeast by adding it to a small amount of sugary water and that is totally unnecessary with this type of yeast. In some places you can get fresh yeast that has a shelf life, even in the fridge, of I think about 2 weeks, so with that type of yeast proofing it may be a sensible thing to do. As the instructions show, I just start with the flour, yeast and water and stir well, and after a short time the mixture starts bubbling. To include a photo of white flour, salt or the other ingredients seemed a bit silly.

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  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Good Healthy Every-day Bread1 year ago
    Good Healthy Every-day Bread

    Thanks for raising this issue, though to be honest I am not convinced that lemon juice will slow the staling process in bread. I have never heard or read of it before and I can’t find anything on google about it. Can you give your source? It is often suggested that lemon juice or vinegar be added to pastry to stop the gluten developing which seems to have the opposite effect of what you are saying – not sure though. One can add a very small amount of lemon juice or ascorbic acid (vitamin C) more or less as a fertilizer for the yeast.Commercial bakeries, probably including supermarket in-store bakeries, add enzymes to slow down the loss of flexibility in the gluten which gives them more time to sell their loaves. If lemon juice slows down the staling process it would seem...

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    Thanks for raising this issue, though to be honest I am not convinced that lemon juice will slow the staling process in bread. I have never heard or read of it before and I can’t find anything on google about it. Can you give your source? It is often suggested that lemon juice or vinegar be added to pastry to stop the gluten developing which seems to have the opposite effect of what you are saying – not sure though. One can add a very small amount of lemon juice or ascorbic acid (vitamin C) more or less as a fertilizer for the yeast.Commercial bakeries, probably including supermarket in-store bakeries, add enzymes to slow down the loss of flexibility in the gluten which gives them more time to sell their loaves. If lemon juice slows down the staling process it would seem that bakeries would use that instead of enzymes that are a lot more expensive than lemon juice.Maybe someone else knows the real answer.

    Thank you for your kind words. My aim is to spread the word on how easy it can be to make your own bread. Did you also check my other bread Instructable? - here - https://www.instructables.com/id/Spicy-English-Tea-Bread/ David

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  • Beekeeper commented on Beekeeper's instructable Spicy English Tea Bread1 year ago
    Spicy English Tea Bread

    You are right, it is really tasty and you need a lot of will power or a big family or friends to share with. In my experience it is never easy to knead bread in the traditional way with lots of raisins in it, and it is very difficult to incorporate the raisins after it has been kneaded. This is why my overnight poolish is so convenient, combined with the second 'sitting' stage which together develop the gluten without the risk of mashing up the raisins.I can see no reason why you couldn't halve the recipe. For my every-day bread I always use 3 cups of flour and 3 cups of water, plus the yeast of course, for the overnight stage as this makes a reasonable quantity. This ends up with two large loaves - one for this week and one for the freezer. If I only make one loaf at a time, in th...

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    You are right, it is really tasty and you need a lot of will power or a big family or friends to share with. In my experience it is never easy to knead bread in the traditional way with lots of raisins in it, and it is very difficult to incorporate the raisins after it has been kneaded. This is why my overnight poolish is so convenient, combined with the second 'sitting' stage which together develop the gluten without the risk of mashing up the raisins.I can see no reason why you couldn't halve the recipe. For my every-day bread I always use 3 cups of flour and 3 cups of water, plus the yeast of course, for the overnight stage as this makes a reasonable quantity. This ends up with two large loaves - one for this week and one for the freezer. If I only make one loaf at a time, in the long run I have to do twice as much work. See https://www.instructables.com/id/Good-Healthy-Every-day-BreadDid you vote in the Bread Contest?

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  • Beekeeper followed Beekeeper1 year ago
      • Spicy English Tea Bread
  • Beekeeper entered Spicy English Tea Bread in the Bread Challenge 2017 contest 1 year ago
  • Beekeeper commented on jessyratfink's instructable Basic Photo Editing1 year ago
    Basic Photo Editing

    Hi thereI am just about to write and post my first Instructable and have tried to upload my photos but only 3 or 4 went through whereas I have 10 or 12. The average size of my photos is 3MB which I suspect is too large. Please can you tell me what is the ideal size for an Instructable? Thanks

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  • Beekeeper commented on Darthorso's instructable Easy Handmade Manitoba Bread1 year ago
    Easy Handmade Manitoba Bread

    Very good Filippo. I too live in Manitoba too and we talk about HARD spring wheat which is high in protein and usually used for bread, and SOFT wheat which is low protein and usually used for cakes and pastry where you don't want it to go leathery. Commercial bread bakeries use 100% hard wheat flour but most people can only buy what is called 'All Purpose' flour. This is a mixture of hard and soft wheat which makes it cheaper for the flour manufacturer (or they make more profit) and the resulting All Purpose flour is just OK for bread and not too leathery for pastry.

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  • Beekeeper commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy No Knead Bread1 year ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    I've been making all my bread for 20 or more years using a similar method and I don't use any sugar at all. None. Flour contains an enzyme called diastase that converts the starch into simple sugars for the yeast to 'eat' when the flour gets wet. No oil/fat either. In my method I only have half of the flour in the 12 - 18 hours stage (overnight) as I'm always afraid of the bowl overflowing. Then in the morning I add the rest of the flour.

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  • Beekeeper commented on jessyratfink's instructable bread recipe2 years ago
    bread recipe

    Sorry to contradict you Rhonda, but I still want to follow the 'be nice' police, so please don't take offence and consider this a discussion rather than a comment and definitely not a criticism.Old fashioned yeasts could often use a 'kick' from the addition of a little sugar, but modern yeast strains have been bred to be extremely vigorous and don't need additional sugar. Flour contains an enzyme called amylase that converts the starch to maltose and glucose, a simple sugar that yeasts can easily ferment. It is the same maltose that is developed in barley when it is allowed to germinate which is used in beer making. Sometimes you may find poor quality flour that has very little amylase which results in poor rising or more likely a very pale crust on baking which is indicative of litt...

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    Sorry to contradict you Rhonda, but I still want to follow the 'be nice' police, so please don't take offence and consider this a discussion rather than a comment and definitely not a criticism.Old fashioned yeasts could often use a 'kick' from the addition of a little sugar, but modern yeast strains have been bred to be extremely vigorous and don't need additional sugar. Flour contains an enzyme called amylase that converts the starch to maltose and glucose, a simple sugar that yeasts can easily ferment. It is the same maltose that is developed in barley when it is allowed to germinate which is used in beer making. Sometimes you may find poor quality flour that has very little amylase which results in poor rising or more likely a very pale crust on baking which is indicative of little caramelizing to give colour to the crust. From the internet - "The vast majority of enzymes are simple proteins. In bread making, we are mostly concerned with the enzyme amylase. The main function of amylase in wheat flour is to break down complex starches into simple sugars. The simple diagram above shows a maltose molecule being separated into two glucose molecules. Without this important process occurring in the dough, fermentation would not occur as yeast requires simple sugars in order to produce carbon dioxide. A proper balance of naturally occurring amylase in wheat flour is desirable in order to produce bread that is properly fermented with richly coloured crust and well developed flavour " I never add sugar or honey or any other sweetener for that matter and have never had a problem. I grind my own flour from organic wheat so I know it is good and fresh.Happy bakingDavid

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  • Beekeeper commented on pubcrawlingpb's instructable Making Cheese at Home2 years ago
    Making Cheese at Home

    One normally adds salt to the curds before pressing OR one immerses the pressed cheese in brine for a period of time (depending on the recipe and size of cheese wheel). If you add salt to the curds and then immerse in brine you will get a very salty cheese which is not good.

    This is excellent pubcrawlingpb and good for you for sparking interest in home cheese making for a lot of people. I have been making cheese at home for a few years and before I got started I watched dozens of YouTube videos, 99% of which were little help. Then I came across a cheese-crazy Australian guy called Gavin Webber who has made a series of videos of making cheese in his kitchen at home. All very easy to follow and if anyone wants to start making cheese I suggest they go to YouTube and search "Gavin Webber". A good one to start with is Farmhouse Cheddar.In some cheeses (e.g. ricotta and mozzarella) the milk is curdled with acid such as vinegar or lemon juice. You get about 1 pound of cheese for every gallon of milk. You don't really need kosher salt: what you do n...

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    This is excellent pubcrawlingpb and good for you for sparking interest in home cheese making for a lot of people. I have been making cheese at home for a few years and before I got started I watched dozens of YouTube videos, 99% of which were little help. Then I came across a cheese-crazy Australian guy called Gavin Webber who has made a series of videos of making cheese in his kitchen at home. All very easy to follow and if anyone wants to start making cheese I suggest they go to YouTube and search "Gavin Webber". A good one to start with is Farmhouse Cheddar.In some cheeses (e.g. ricotta and mozzarella) the milk is curdled with acid such as vinegar or lemon juice. You get about 1 pound of cheese for every gallon of milk. You don't really need kosher salt: what you do need is iodine-free salt such as pickling salt or kosher salt or any other iodine free variety.

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  • DIY: Illuminated House Number Powered By Solar Panels

    I wonder if I could mask the numbers and use sandpaper as I don't have an etching machine or sand blasting equipment? Any ideas out there as to whether this might work?

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  • Automated Solar Hot Water Power Shower using Black Plastic Pipes

    No, I used the regular black ABS waste pipe - the same as used under my kitchen sink etc. It takes hot water from the tap OK and the occasional boiling water from cooking something on the stove, so I thought it would be suitable. I've never heard of crosslinked PE but will look for it. Thanks for the tip.

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  • Automated Solar Hot Water Power Shower using Black Plastic Pipes

    Yes, I know 90 degrees to the sun is the most efficient, but my angle was more vertical to give better energy absorption during spring and fall. The problem was, even at the less efficient angle at high summer it was too efficient and the water boiled. My version has reflective insulating bubble wrap behind the pipes and glass in front. It has door to close it during winter or hail and a drain at the bottom to empty it out for winter.

    I have to agree with you that plastic pipes are unsatisfactory. I made a hot water shower a couple of years ago for an off-grid home using 1.5 inch black waste water pipes and appropriate 90 degree bends and tee pieces. The shower was always 'on' to relieve any pressure build-up and it was the incoming water at the bottom from the hose pipe that pushed the hot out at the top. It worked much better than expected and I had to modify the plumbing to make it possible to adjust the temperature coming out of the shower. It got so hot that it almost boiled and it has totally bent and de-formed all the plastic pipes! I'll see if I can attach a couple of photos. I should have taken lots of photos and written an Instructable….. It's a free standing unit on wheels so it can be turned ...

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    I have to agree with you that plastic pipes are unsatisfactory. I made a hot water shower a couple of years ago for an off-grid home using 1.5 inch black waste water pipes and appropriate 90 degree bends and tee pieces. The shower was always 'on' to relieve any pressure build-up and it was the incoming water at the bottom from the hose pipe that pushed the hot out at the top. It worked much better than expected and I had to modify the plumbing to make it possible to adjust the temperature coming out of the shower. It got so hot that it almost boiled and it has totally bent and de-formed all the plastic pipes! I'll see if I can attach a couple of photos. I should have taken lots of photos and written an Instructable….. It's a free standing unit on wheels so it can be turned to face the sun.

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  • Beekeeper commented on woodskills's instructable Jewelry Box Build by WoodSkills2 years ago
    Jewelry Box Build by WoodSkills

    Very nice and I like your shooting board. One thing I can't see is how you attach the hinges which I find is the most difficult part of making any box. They look like stop hinges that can only be opened about 80 degrees.

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