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  • Diesel cars have about the same maintenance as a petrol body wise. Glow plugs don't go as quickly as spark plugs though as they are only used to start the engine. Once the engine is running, you can disconnect all the electrics and it will still keep running, a solenoid to shut off the fuel is used to stop the engine, it's the ONLY way. It's also the reason why you can't bump start a diesel with a completely flat battery, no power to the solenoid to open the fuel valve. Diesel engines will go on forever unless they've been run hard at high revs a lot. 150K miles is nothing to a diesel engine, it's only just run in properly by then.Diesel fuel can be slightly dearer than petrol in some countries but with around 50% more MPG, diesel works out a lot cheaper in the long run. The ONLY real thi…

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    Diesel cars have about the same maintenance as a petrol body wise. Glow plugs don't go as quickly as spark plugs though as they are only used to start the engine. Once the engine is running, you can disconnect all the electrics and it will still keep running, a solenoid to shut off the fuel is used to stop the engine, it's the ONLY way. It's also the reason why you can't bump start a diesel with a completely flat battery, no power to the solenoid to open the fuel valve. Diesel engines will go on forever unless they've been run hard at high revs a lot. 150K miles is nothing to a diesel engine, it's only just run in properly by then.Diesel fuel can be slightly dearer than petrol in some countries but with around 50% more MPG, diesel works out a lot cheaper in the long run. The ONLY real thing to be careful of is to ensure that the car you want to buy has a good quality and working Catalytic Converter, not the cheap garbage ones that Fords have. Get a nasty one and it will smoke like crazy, chances are, it won't pass the next MOT emissions test. Even ticking over, give it a boot and see if it blows out lots of black smoke before you decide to buy it.I have a 2001 Saab 9-3 2.2 TiD and emissions were 0.5 on my last MOT and I get around 55MPG on a run and 45MPG around town, not too shabby for an 18 year old 2.2 litre engine with 200K miles on the clock. The only main thing about a diesel is that you can't expect a performance car, I've see a 2 litre cranked up to 200BHP but most factory cars have about 120 to 150. However, they pull like a train and mine will poodle around all day in second gear, up quite steep hills as well, without even touching the accelerator. Even my petrol 2.2 SRI 150 Vectra I had before it would stall on a slight hill in first unlesss I put my foot down a bit. In all, diesels are more suited to longer journeys and especially for towing trailers and caravans. Around town all the time, they can get choked up unless you give it a good run on the motorway occasionally to blow out the c**p. Just be a bit careful on insurance, I don't know how these insurance companies decide on the insurance classes but you can end up with a far more expensive car for insurance than it really should be. Best to check the class before you buy one to be certain. My Saab 9-3 saloon is class 21 but the same year 9-5 which is identical in every way except that it has an estate body, (Station Wagon if you're American), is class 34. Go figure.

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