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  • Build an Electric Foundry for Melting Aluminum (that Works on 120 VAC)

    Very nice. I made a much hackier one out of a party-size Helium can--I cut the bottom off as well and set an insulated tube on top of a portable electric hotplate. It worked pretty well until my crucible (bottom part of a 1lb LPG canister) burned through and filled my hotplate with aluminum. Yours is a much cleaner build, and I like how the carriage bolt heads align the lid. I'm going to keep an eye out for an old propane tank.You might bolt an electrical junction box around the terminal through-holes to protect the bare connections and maybe also provide a ground connection that could work with a GFCI.

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  • Melt Down Your Aluminum Cans

    Smash the cans--the more dense you can make the cans going into the crucible, the less opportunity the aluminum has to oxidize into slag.

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  • A Much Safer Table Saw Taper Jig

    What's the purpose of the T-bolt grinding? It sounds like you've got a 8mm slot for the bolt, and a 12mm wide slot for the head, and you've ground the heads to some intermediate diameter. It doesn't seem like they'd fit through an 8mm slot.(I'd be using 1/4"-20 hardware in the US.)

    Ok -- I was confused. I thought you were going for drop-in T-bolts, but you insert them from the bottom. Then the ground 12mm faces in the 12mm slots keep them from turning as you tighten the knobs. Thanks.

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  • N95 Compatible Mask Cover

    So, in your pictures, white/orange is the outside, black is the middle layer sewn completely to the white/orange side, and the green is the filter pocket layer sewn 3/4th of the way around to the white/orange+black sandwich. Right?

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  • DavidF15 commented on imsmooth's instructable Induction Heater 12 KW
    Induction Heater 12 KW

    It's a great project.It might be nice to add a tank circuit schematic to the instructable since the other schematics refer to it & it would help make sense of things electrically. I know I'm slow, but I had to click back and forth to the other site and look at the pics to understand the tank circuit. Also, what's the variac for?

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  • Viking Stargazing Chairs

    Thanks for the numbers (and the instructable)--I was trying to eyeball it from the pics and video. 1.5"x9" is pretty close to the 1.5"x9.5" finished size of a standard 2x10.

    By "scaffold boards" you mean nominal 2"x12" (1.5"x11.5" surfaced) boards right?

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  • Transform Retired Climbing Rope Into Bowls and Other Useful Things

    Oh, I see--the dremel mod to the presser foot it to allow a new space for the needle to go through and do zig-zags in further back in the bent/flattened plate.

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  • Resurfacing Cast Iron Pans

    I don't really know the chemistry, just that there's a middle point between sticky/gummy oil of insufficient heat and burning off the seasoning. I think you are right about the polymerization as an oxygen reaction, but carbonizing is typically driving all the non-carbon out and leaving just carbon. Or maybe you are thinking of carburizing with a torch tuned to produce excess carbon to add carbon to the heated material?

    I don't really know the chemistry, just that there's a middle point between sticky/gummy oil of insufficient heat and burning off the seasoning. I think you are right about the polymerization as an oxygen reaction, but carbonizing is typically driving all the non-carbon out and leaving just carbon. Or maybe you are thinking of carburizing with a torch tuned to produce excess carbon to add carbon to the heated material?

    I don't really know the chemistry, just that there's a middle point between sticky/gummy oil of insufficient heat and burning off the seasoning. I think you are right about the polymerization as an oxygen reaction, but carbonizing is typically driving all the non-carbon out and leaving just carbon. Or maybe you are thinking of carburizing with a torch tuned to produce excess carbon to add carbon to the heated material?

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  • Resurfacing Cast Iron Pans

    It might be good to discuss things gone wrong -- The 400F for an hour should polymerize the oil into a hard, smooth, non-stick surface. If the heat & time isn't enough to polymerize your chosen oil, you get a gummy, sticky surface and should reheat it until it is hard (try adding 20F and don't add more layers of new oil until the first are hardened.) If the heat and time is too much for the particular oil, the polymerized/plasticized layer will burn and start to flake off & you have to clean it off and start over.

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  • The Eratosthenes-inator

    Great tool. Thanks.I'd consider fixing only one end of the whiteboard, (or just the middle of the whiteboard) to the arcs and use something temporary to bend the ends against the arcs. Then you can demonstrate the same setup in the counterfactual flat-earth configuration and see the differences.

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  • Super Simple DIY Spot Welder Pen (MOT Battery Tab Welder Pen) 10$

    Cool. So this project adapts lug connections to 0.040 to 3/32 tungsten welding rods. Do the 1/8" rods work in the 3mm collet chucks?

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  • DavidF15 commented on Cats Science Club's instructable Green Confetti

    About the drying, from the pics is looks like you just dried off the surface water of freshly picked wet leaves using a paper towel. Did you do more drying that that? Were the leaves still fresh or did you dry them out to crunchy-dry?

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  • Good instructable.For many years, I've used something similar--an 8-page configuration like https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-mini-booklet/ I like how the pages flip from one to the next sequentially, and how there's just one fold on the outside. You could do the last fold as an M/accordian fold and get sequential pages, but you'd get two outside folds at the spine. I like that you produce & use variable sizes of sheets, for which the 8-page technique is less useful.

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  • DavidF15 commented on KevsWoodworks's instructable Miter Sled

    Doing some repetitive work on my radial arm saw, I'd sometimes fail to dust out the blind corner enough and screw up a piece. Then I started building my stop blocks to key off the top of the fence and not sit flush on the table, and I've felt less dumb ever since.

    Cool. I like that you are transferring the accuracy of the original 2'x2' square into the corner jig and controlling the tolerance stack-up with minimal steps. Since you start with/make a good 90 degrees at the beginning, the care you take in keeping the top plate parallel to the base, and attaching the runners at the 45, will keep any errors under tight control.The only change I'd consider would be to add a bit of clearance on the bottom of the stop blocks to protect against any waste/sawdust from building up in the corners & shortening a series of repeated cuts.

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  • So, you click the "Vote Now" button to give you mad props for the contest? Done!

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  • Try installing the library: sudo apt install python-serialYou can look for packages with: sudo apt search serial

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  • I'm jealous. I made a much uglier bender out of scrap OSB. I power it with an AC dimmer like https://www.amazon.com/HiLetgo-Control-Regulator-50-220V-Adjustable/dp/B00LODGP2E through a 12V transformer out of a dead UPC. I find I use mine much more often for melt-cutting synthetic rope, string, paracord, and bungee cord than I do for bending acrylic, so I made a portion of the hot wire accessible--mine folds completely flat, exposing a length of wire between my horizontally mounted terminal and the hinge.Maybe adding a blind- or through- hole or slot near the less-used hinge to allow for rope-cutting would be a nice feature?I'm also planning on using my same power supply for a vertical, open wire for a hot-wire bandsaw-like tool for cutting plastic foam, but I haven't gotten around to th…

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    I'm jealous. I made a much uglier bender out of scrap OSB. I power it with an AC dimmer like https://www.amazon.com/HiLetgo-Control-Regulator-50-220V-Adjustable/dp/B00LODGP2E through a 12V transformer out of a dead UPC. I find I use mine much more often for melt-cutting synthetic rope, string, paracord, and bungee cord than I do for bending acrylic, so I made a portion of the hot wire accessible--mine folds completely flat, exposing a length of wire between my horizontally mounted terminal and the hinge.Maybe adding a blind- or through- hole or slot near the less-used hinge to allow for rope-cutting would be a nice feature?I'm also planning on using my same power supply for a vertical, open wire for a hot-wire bandsaw-like tool for cutting plastic foam, but I haven't gotten around to that yet. I think I'd add a hole or slot to my table, and an overhead arm with a spring to support the vertical wire.

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  • I like all the detail bits it looked like you worked out--finishing the edges of the walls, adding the trim board around the drawers to match drawer faces. Does the trim-strip push the drawers out noticeably? From the last few pics the drawer faces look a little proud of the trim.

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  • In Geometry, it is the method of similar triangles. You can increase the accuracy of your method by transferring the parallel lines by setting a drafting triangle against your longest line, and sliding the triangle's adjacent side along a straightedge until it matches your points.

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  • To get the final end of the third rail parallel you could use an additional straight edge as the second stick in a set of "Winding sticks". (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winding_stick ) You don't need to rely on transferring the accuracy of your bubble to make both ends parallel, but you can put an additional straight edge across the ends of the board and sight across to see and correct any misalignment from the level.

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  • Yes: you set one edge of a triangle along your first line, then set a straight edge along an adjacent side, then slide/translate the triangle along the straight edge until the initial edge of the triangle is at the point where you want the line, and then draw the new parallel line. It works by the principle of similar triangles.

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  • Yow, it seems like a lot to do something likely less accurate and general than https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-divide-a-line-into-equal-parts-without-meas/

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  • Commodity carbon steel is running about $0.45/lb per https://agmetalminer.com/metal-prices/carbon-steel... so 230 lb x $0.45/lb = $130Scrap prices are lower at maybe $0.08/lb per https://www.capitalscrapmetal.com/prices/ so maybe $18.But a 10 lb 1/2"x4"x18" chunk of S7 is a pretty special piece of scrap--Online retail I saw a quote for $150. That looks like the critical ingredient to keep an eye out for.

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  • It works great. Mine is much uglier than yours though. I used a scrap piece of firewood-cherry for a combined handle-block, and a bent carriage bolt for the thumbscrew, but I like the recessed slot that the entire Allen-wrench scribe sinks back into.

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  • Ah, at first I missed that this works with two sets of rails: The metal shelf rails are statically attached to the router though the plexiglass and the wooden base--the base does not slide with respect to the metal rails. The metal rail + base + router assembly rides freely on top of static rails (runners) mounted around/to the workpieces.Thanks, it looks like a nice project. I want some router rails and this looks good.Since it doesn't look like you are using much of the acrylic for viewing, I think I would go a bit riskier and use a much bigger viewing hole and take full advantage of increased visibility, or choose to clamp/bolt the router directly to the base for increased stiffness.

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  • You could also use a non-I2C LCD with the plain LiquidCrystal library with these settings instead: #include <LiquidCrystal.h> // initialize the library by associating any needed LCD interface pin // with the arduino pin number it is connected to const int rs =12, en =11, d4 =5, d5 =4, d6 =3, d7 =2; LiquidCrystal lcd(rs, en, d4, d5, d6, d7);

    0.8mm wire wrapped 18 turns around 200mm diameter is 0.377 ohms, which at 12V could develop 31A. 0.4mm for 25 turns at 100mm is 1.04 ohms, and 11A.0.4mm for 48 turns at 100mm is 2.01 ohms for 5.9AFor more power, you might try shooting for the max rated amps for the IRL540: 28A at 25C, so 0.42 ohms, or 315cm of 0.4mm wire (10 turns around the 100mm) Maybe make sure that the paths from the 12V battery to the coil circuity is strong enough to deliver those amps and add a big capacitor too. If you can deliver a stronger pulse, you might be able to get more performance.

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  • DavidF15 commented on loboat's instructable PCB Business Card With NFC

    I wonder if you could DIY embed the chips within holes in the PCB so they don't stand proud of the surface, somewhat like the chips in credit cards. Then a bit of epoxy or tape could protect the components. And as is, maybe a well-placed glob of epoxy could cover the light- bulb silkscreen to protect the components artistically.

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  • "Wire lath screws" instead of "Wire lathe screws"?

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  • If you are looking to make it more modular and easier to breakdown and reassemble, I'd consider learning a few good knots and using rope to fasten the barrels to the frame. Rope or strapping could be more corrosion-resistant and more field serviceable than deck screws.

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  • Regarding the miter joints on the corners-- you'd be better off with butt joints. Glued miter joints are a bit stronger than glued butts, but with only screws and not glue, you can get more meat and more screws into a butt joint. Just cut two of your 10-foots 3" shorter and you can still have the same dimensions.If you want to get fancier and a bit stronger, try a half-lap joint.

    If you moved the barrels out to the ends and away from the center, you'd still have the same buoyancy but you'd have a more stability on the ends

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  • My tip about trig was really two things: First for fixturing: If you lay out a line parallel to the intended edge and drill a couple 1/4" holes along the line, you could temporarily put a couple 1/4" pins in the holes and run them against a straight edge or fence to cut or finish sand the edge.Second, if you can find a trig table of 'Tan' versus angle, you could multiply tan(angle) * length between holes to get rise between holes. For example, tan(70 degrees) = 2.747477, so you could make an 8" wide 70 degree angle by making a mark, going over 8" and going up 21.98" Or you could do it backwards and divide-- with a 24" carpenter's square, 24"/2.747477 = 8.735" out on the outside of the short leg would be 70 degrees. See https://www.instructables…

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    My tip about trig was really two things: First for fixturing: If you lay out a line parallel to the intended edge and drill a couple 1/4" holes along the line, you could temporarily put a couple 1/4" pins in the holes and run them against a straight edge or fence to cut or finish sand the edge.Second, if you can find a trig table of 'Tan' versus angle, you could multiply tan(angle) * length between holes to get rise between holes. For example, tan(70 degrees) = 2.747477, so you could make an 8" wide 70 degree angle by making a mark, going over 8" and going up 21.98" Or you could do it backwards and divide-- with a 24" carpenter's square, 24"/2.747477 = 8.735" out on the outside of the short leg would be 70 degrees. See https://www.instructables.com/id/Get-accurate-angles-without-a-protractor/ for some tangent trig ratios on a carpenter's square.Taken together, if you can work out the trig, and measure over and up, you could drill some fixturing holes in from your corners a bit and be able to cut, check and re-finish your angles very accurately.

    Try some trig to lay out a couple holes at the proper angle, and you can use pins/drill rod through the holes to fixture the part for cutting, trimming and re-finishing extremely accurately. With trig, you can lay out accurate angles with large baselines without even a protractor at hand.

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  • I didn't figure out the second screw -- I got enough out of sort of bending it and working the first screw.

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  • Making & using radiused form tools is pretty cool.I followed the headline to here looking for a 'radius bar' to do larger arcs. I eventually found a cool article in the December 1958 popular mechanics (pages 193-196) which had good pics.Basically, you make a double-pointed bar of the radius you want, (they suggest it works for 3" radius minimum) and use it as a spacer between the cross-slide and the tailstock or headstock. Then you keep light pressure with the feed wheel against the radius bar as you traverse with the cross-slide, letting the radius bar control the path. The pics at PM are good--then ends of the pointed radius bar fit into shallow holes drilled into your cross-slide and tailstock, or they also suggest making a wooden pivot block with a hole to clamp to the bed.…

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    Making & using radiused form tools is pretty cool.I followed the headline to here looking for a 'radius bar' to do larger arcs. I eventually found a cool article in the December 1958 popular mechanics (pages 193-196) which had good pics.Basically, you make a double-pointed bar of the radius you want, (they suggest it works for 3" radius minimum) and use it as a spacer between the cross-slide and the tailstock or headstock. Then you keep light pressure with the feed wheel against the radius bar as you traverse with the cross-slide, letting the radius bar control the path. The pics at PM are good--then ends of the pointed radius bar fit into shallow holes drilled into your cross-slide and tailstock, or they also suggest making a wooden pivot block with a hole to clamp to the bed. Also, the compound slide is set parallel to the ways, so you can use the compound slide to take deeper and deeper cuts.

    You could use the same procedure, just pivot your form tool so the center axis of the radius is perpendicular to the ways.

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  • DavidF15 commented on Naran's instructable Cheapest Smart Home for $38

    Visually, the "RF sockets" look like Etekcity devices, available on amazon for $30 for a kit of 5 sockets and 2 handheld transmitters. Over at https://www.samkear.com/hardware/control-power-out... it says you can get a compatible 433MHz transmitter/receiver kit for about $5 ($6.66 SMAKN kit from Amazon). Amazon says the SMAKN thing is ASK/OOK modulation. There looks like a lot of meat on that other blog entry.

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  • The RTKLIB program `conv2bin rover.ubx` file can convert files into RINEX files: $ bin/convbin rover_20171211T165315.ubxinput file: rover_20171211T165315.ubx (u-blox)->rinex obs : rover_20171211T165315.obs->rinex nav : rover_20171211T165315.nav->rinex gnav: rover_20171211T165315.gnav->rinex hnav: rover_20171211T165315.hnav->rinex qnav: rover_20171211T165315.qnav->rinex lnav: rover_20171211T165315.lnav->rinex cnav: rover_20171211T165315.cnav->rinex inav: rover_20171211T165315.inav->sbas log: rover_20171211T165315.sbs2017/12/11 16:53:36-12/11 23:54:54: O=25279 N=50 G=102 H=75 L=88 S=13470$

    I've only got one ublox-M8T, and I was eventually able to get it to report some sub-centimeter scale positions referenced to a CORS station, but that was including averaging over a long, stationary time. I liked the http://rtkexplorer.com/ stuff for guidance. I eventually got it working under Wine on OSX, communicating with the M8t and finally getting fixes. The big tricks for me was using the updated 2.4.3 and rtkexplorer demo5 code which actually decoded the M8T messages, then figuring out how to turn on some monitors/logs (tiny box just above the RTKNAVI Start button) and see where it might be having problems.

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  • The coloring/configuration of the half-bridge cell wires if very important. They are different in several of your pictures. The wires on the cells pictured in step 2 (W-R-B) don't match the cells in the schematic (B-W-R). The wiring on the cells in the different panels of the step 1 pic differ from each other.If you don't drive and sense on the center taps of the half-bridges, the circuit would have half the sensitivity of https://arduino.stackexchange.com/a/18698/6628 configuration since your wheatstone bridge would exist between the cell's center terminals, and then be attenuated from each node of the wheatstone bridge into the HX711 by the variable resistance of the strain gauge.To make sure you get it right, be sure to figure out which two terminals on the load cells have the hi…

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    The coloring/configuration of the half-bridge cell wires if very important. They are different in several of your pictures. The wires on the cells pictured in step 2 (W-R-B) don't match the cells in the schematic (B-W-R). The wiring on the cells in the different panels of the step 1 pic differ from each other.If you don't drive and sense on the center taps of the half-bridges, the circuit would have half the sensitivity of https://arduino.stackexchange.com/a/18698/6628 configuration since your wheatstone bridge would exist between the cell's center terminals, and then be attenuated from each node of the wheatstone bridge into the HX711 by the variable resistance of the strain gauge.To make sure you get it right, be sure to figure out which two terminals on the load cells have the highest resistance between them (E.g. Black and White, to match your schematic), wire them in a big color matching loop, like B-B W-W B-B W-W and then excite (E+/E-) two opposite center taps (R) and sense (A+/A-) on the other pair of center taps.

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  • Grrr -- point your browser to the wemoipaddress:port/setup.xml file for its capabilities.

    Thanks,I found http://www.makermusings.com/2015/07/13/amazon-echo... as some info on the discovery and communication protocols used by the Wemo stuff. They use uPnP and SOAP. If you want to see what the switch advertises it can do, try http://www.makermusings.com/2015/07/13/amazon-echo...

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  • Cool. I needed one of these just a couple days ago and I think I'll make this one. I think I'll probably file only the inner edge of the allen wrench, leaving the outer edge at 90 degrees, so I can set and mark flush to an external surface,

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  • Try some ground coffee as an ice cream topping. Yum!

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  • Awesome project. I was just thinking about a string pole late I saw in Branson Missouri about 35 years ago. I love the use of bungee elastic in lieu of the greenwood sapling.Maybe try a skinnier piece of scrap for the toolrest-crosspiece. The one in the pics looks too wide and would limit the ways you can vary to position and angles the chisels or gouges with respect to the workpiece.

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  • The archived javascript didn't work for me, but they have a non-java set of percentages at https://web.archive.org/web/20080101130044/http://www.egeorgeonline.com/getapage/nojava.html (the javascript looks like it only does proportions anyway)

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  • The Forest Service pub is at http://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/9823 and the table is on page 4 (or between pages 3 & 4)

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  • Looks like the bars would deflect about 0.003" per pound of force in the middle. How much does the belt stretch?

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  • So, metric-wise, the drink is 2L cream soda, 75ml butterscotch syrup, and 5ml butter extract, plus a topping of 1L marshmallow fluff, 1L whipping cream, 15ml powdered sugar, and 18ml of rum extract.

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  • DavidF15 commented on Vulcaman's instructable Cherry- 60€ 3D-Printer

    No, endstops are not necessary. You jog to the center of the board, set the nozzle to a paper-thickness above the board, and send a "G92 X0 Y0 Z0.01, you can set the coordinates just fine. If the printer is accurate, and the slicer is set to match the build area, you really don't need them.

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