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DennisO22

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  • I do not understand your language!

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  • Bushfire Wildlife Water Station

    What a fantastic idea. Maybe you could get hardware outlets could make up a 'kit' from their offcuts to donate supplies so people could assemble and distribute them in their localities.

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  • DennisO22 commented on FrankM220's forum topic just to say thanks!?

    Just a couple of points about the text. If a shielding gas contains CO2 it is NOT a MIG welding operation it is a MAG welding operation since CO2 is an active gas - it breaks down (dissassoation) in the welding operation to produce Carbon Monoxide (which absorbs uncontrolled Oxygen from the atmosphere) preventing it entering the weld, and Oxygen (controlled amount, e.g 10% in the shielding gas) which determines the weld metal fluidity and weld penetration and is therefore not Inert. Argon and Helium are the inert welding gasses. Also Oxygen is not flammable - but it supports combustion.

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  • DennisO22 commented on IAmADragonite's forum topic PPE?

    You certainly do need adequate protection gas shielded arc welding operations. It is not just the sparks. Gas shielded arc welding operations are rich in Infrared and Ultraviolet radiation. You can get seriously burned in a very short time if you fail to protect your skin - especially on the more tender parts of the body. Examples would be the chest and the stomach. I have witnessed blisters, like VERY serious sunburn, caused in minutes on unprotected skin. Don't be a foolish hero - wear the correct body as well as face protection. In the industries where I used to work training people to weld. You would be shown the workshop door if you failed to adhere to the welding safety regulations.

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  •  Homemade Gesso Recipe

    AS this recipe contains Linseed oil - can acrylic paints be painted on it?

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  • DennisO22 commented on MikaelP14's forum topic Galvanized steels?

    It is recommended that you remove galvanised coating for about 1" from each side of the weld line. Zinc fumes although not toxic, but can be absorbed into the lungs and into the bloodstream where it collects and gives the feeling of aching joints. It also gives the feeling of influenza headache - nausea. It is called 'welders ague of zinc chills'. It's effects can be lessened by drinking milk. The effect will pass off after a couple of very uncomfortable hours. But adequate ventilation is essential when welding zinc coated articles.

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  • If you take it out of the freezer before it is 'solid' and stir it up then put it back to freeze. You will get a smoother texture as you will break down the ice crystals.

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  • DennisO22 commented on danmartin49's instructable Rope/Cord Maker

    I'm interested in knowing which way the lays are twisted in your string. I make Flemish twist archery strings by hand. I twist each lay to the left and then lay it to the right. You can also do the reverse twist right and lay left. Looking at your pictures, it looks like you are twisting each lay clockwise and laying in clockwise. Is that the case?

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  • DennisO22 commented on neslo63's instructable 4 PLY , No Problem !!

    Neat idea. Do you also have a machine that will cut the newspaper sheets to the correct width to fit your machine?

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  • Excellent article. When I started work there was told one golden rule in our engineering workshop. 'A dirty workshop is a DANGEROUS workshop'.

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  • Reclaimed Tool Storage (Peg Board)

    After posting my comment I received requests for pictures of my version. So today I took 4 pics of my tool cupboard and have attached them here. I only opened the left side of the tool cabinet to show the construction. The right side works exactly the same. I hope you enjoy making a version like mine.

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  • I made a free standing version of this idea about 10 years ago. My design is slightly different to yours. Instead of having '1 wide door' for each half cabinet width. I made each of my doors the width of half the half the width of my cabinet. BUT '2 deep'. So each door is in two sections. An outer door and an inner door. The inner doors are hinged onto the main cabinet and the outer doors are hinged onto the inner doors (each on the same side). The left hand doors are hinged on the left and the right hand doors are hinged on the right. Latches on the top of each pair of doors allows either the front door to be opened separate to the inner door or the inner door (with the closed outer door) opened to reveal the cabinet and the tool stored in the inner door, but without having to open th…

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    I made a free standing version of this idea about 10 years ago. My design is slightly different to yours. Instead of having '1 wide door' for each half cabinet width. I made each of my doors the width of half the half the width of my cabinet. BUT '2 deep'. So each door is in two sections. An outer door and an inner door. The inner doors are hinged onto the main cabinet and the outer doors are hinged onto the inner doors (each on the same side). The left hand doors are hinged on the left and the right hand doors are hinged on the right. Latches on the top of each pair of doors allows either the front door to be opened separate to the inner door or the inner door (with the closed outer door) opened to reveal the cabinet and the tool stored in the inner door, but without having to open the outer door. In effect it's like opening a book. It means that the doors only extend a small way into my workshop when I open them to get access to my tools. It sounds complex but it is really simple.

    No I don't usually bother with stuff like that. But I will try and take some pics and post them for you.

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  • My grandson loves gingerbread men. But I don't want to give them to him all at once. Can they be frozen?

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  • Looking at the 'setup' with the distances between original image - mirror - drawing surface. I am guessing that the final result is the same size as the original. If you make the distance between the mirror and the drawing surface greater, will it allow you to increase the size of the copy?

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  • Great instructable. Do you have a design for a Camera Lucida?

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  • Impressive. Really impressive. I suppose the sky's the limit now!

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  • Excellent. The simplest ideas are always the best.

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  • Film is not dead - not by a long way. I still shoot and process black and white film. Film negative images outlast digital by years! How long do your images last when you burn them onto a CD - 5 years? I have film negatives that are at least 30 years old and what about the negatives dating from the 2nd world war and still capable of producing a hard copy. They can be scanned and used to produce a digital print. That's my moan over. I like the idea of re-purposing kit to give it a new lease of life. Great idea SLR lens to telescope conversion.

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  • DennisO22 commented on deceiver's instructable Convertible Wall Easel

    Nice instructable. Well thought out with straight forward construction.

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  • The stainless steel alloy containing 8% Nickel and 18% Chromium is an Austenitic Stainless steel. That means it retains an austenitic structure at room temperature when normally it is only present above the upper critical point (the temperature at which all changes in the structure of the steel have taken place. This temperature will depend upon the alloy content of each metal. The blackening of stainless steel is caused by Oxygen. Which is why Manual Metal Arc welding rods and M.A.G / M.I.G.welding wires contain the deoxidizers Aluminium, Titanium and Niobium. Often referred to as either 'Double Deoxidized' (two of the three) or Triple Deoxidized (all three). These are incorporated in the electrode/filler wire coating.

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  • DennisO22 commented on dekeros's instructable Simple Dowel Maker Jig

    You don't have to be limited to the 1/2" drill chuck size. Just get an adapter that takes a socket tool (or make one). Then you can fit a socket that takes the size of dowel timber you want to use to make the dowel. By the way. Your work bench is nearly as untidy as mine!

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  • If you do not have a vacuum machine or are using ziploc type bags. A simple way to remove the unwanted air from the bag is to close the zip seal leaving a small section open. Immerse the bag in a large bowl of water, keeping the open section above the water level. The weight of the water will cause the plastic bag to collapse and so remove the air. When it's done simply close the rest of the zip (keeping the collapsed bag under the water and the open zip above the water).

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  • DennisO22 commented on charliecadin's instructable Wine Cork Surfboard

    I'm not a surfer. But I think this is a fab idea. Great original thinking.

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  • DennisO22 commented on noahw's instructable How to Weld - MIG Welding

    Well actually you weld stainless steel with a gas mixture containing oxygen NOT Carbon Dioxide. Because the carbon in the CO2 will combine with the chromium in the steel to for chromium carbide which will lead to loss of corrosion resistance and cracking.

    I totally agree. Go and get taught by a professional. Having taught welders (and other engineers) for 30 years I know the differences between incorrect and correct MIG/MAG setting-up procedures. And the differences between short circuit and spray transfer methods. As well as the safety aspects that are not apparent to non-professionals.

    There are two types of burns when welding. Direct burns and indirect burns. Direct are when you come into contact with hot/molten metal (sparks etc). However. With gas shielded arc welding since there is no dense smoke shielding, as there is with manual metal arc welding, the operator from infra red radiation you can get burning of the skin similar to severe sun burn (caused by a more intense form of sun radiation). So DON'T be a hero. Weld with a pair of gauntlets ALWAYS. Continued exposure to IR radiation could prove very costly to your skin in the long run. I trained welders for 30 years - trust me - it makes sense.

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  • A neat idea for an angled chuck. I have one for a couple of years - now I have a use for it. Great instructable.

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  • I am aware of once instance where a 'welder' working on coded work did that 'trick'. It was found on xray examination and it cost him his job and reputation and the company that employed him thousands of pounds to get ALL other welds irrespective of who welded them checked. Having held 4 ASME IX certificates I know how difficult it can be to produce quality work every time and it could be tempting to think you can get away with short-cuts - but it just is not worth the risk. Root inserts or Backing strips specifically made for welding operations are fine, but improvised uncontrolled 'modifications' to joint design are not

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  • It is common practice in the fabrication industry to break-up long welding seams to reduce/eliminate distortion. The purpose of these sequences is to prevent the continual expansion and contraction as the welding operation proceeds. The exception to this is with processes such as submerged arc welding which are used for long uninterpreted welding seams on items such as fabricated support structures on heavy gauge materials. Welding sequences are also used on metals known to distort easily, stainless steel being a notable example due to its low coefficient of thermal conductivity and high coefficient of expansion (that means it distorts extensively with minimal heat input). Where you weld a short section then miss a short section, then weld a short section is called 'skip welding'. Where y…

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    It is common practice in the fabrication industry to break-up long welding seams to reduce/eliminate distortion. The purpose of these sequences is to prevent the continual expansion and contraction as the welding operation proceeds. The exception to this is with processes such as submerged arc welding which are used for long uninterpreted welding seams on items such as fabricated support structures on heavy gauge materials. Welding sequences are also used on metals known to distort easily, stainless steel being a notable example due to its low coefficient of thermal conductivity and high coefficient of expansion (that means it distorts extensively with minimal heat input). Where you weld a short section then miss a short section, then weld a short section is called 'skip welding'. Where you weld a short section then move back a short distance from the weld start, then weld that section toward the start of the previous weld is called 'back-step' welding. There is nothing wrong in the way you achieved the result you wanted. But it is 'bad practice' to fill a proposed weld with welding rod since root penetration/fusion cannot be guaranteed. It looks as though necessity was the mother of invention in this case.

    It is common practice in the fabrication industry to break-up long welding seams to reduce/eliminate distortion. The purpose of these sequences is to prevent the continual expansion and contraction as the welding operation proceeds. The exception to this is with processes such as submerged arc welding which are used for long uninterpreted welding seams on items such as fabricated support structures on heavy gauge materials. Welding sequences are also used on metals known to distort easily, stainless steel being a notable example due to its low coefficient of thermal conductivity and high coefficient of expansion (that means it distorts extensively with minimal heat input). Where you weld a short section then miss a short section, then weld a short section is called 'skip welding'. Where y…

    see more »

    It is common practice in the fabrication industry to break-up long welding seams to reduce/eliminate distortion. The purpose of these sequences is to prevent the continual expansion and contraction as the welding operation proceeds. The exception to this is with processes such as submerged arc welding which are used for long uninterpreted welding seams on items such as fabricated support structures on heavy gauge materials. Welding sequences are also used on metals known to distort easily, stainless steel being a notable example due to its low coefficient of thermal conductivity and high coefficient of expansion (that means it distorts extensively with minimal heat input). Where you weld a short section then miss a short section, then weld a short section is called 'skip welding'. Where you weld a short section then move back a short distance from the weld start, then weld that section toward the start of the previous weld in called 'back-step' welding. There is nothing wrong in the way you achieved the result you wanted. But it is 'bad practice' to fill a proposed weld with welding rod since root penetration/fusion cannot be guaranteed. It looks as though necessity was the mother of invention in this case.

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  • Excellent instructable. I am going to make one for my grandchildren for Christmas. Their parents will go nuts trying to find 'lost' marbles!

    On the rolling ball sculpture. What a fascinating thing to watch. Someone definitely had too much free time on their hands!

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  • Nice Instructable. Just a couple of points I hope will be helpful. The purpose of quenching is to try (in the case of an uncontrolled environment i.e DIY heat treatment) and produce a martensitic structure (a very hard but brittle atomic structure) that will be retained at room temperatures. The carbon content of the material will determine the success of this. In the case of your file, it has a high carbon content and that will require less heat than other lower carbon content steels, but as has been stated it will be VERY brittle. You could modify this brittleness by holding the knife with a pair of tongs etc and heating up the HANDLE END ONLY until it is red heat. Remove it from the heat and watch the cutting end change to a 'Straw' colour and immediately quench in oil (tempering). The…

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    Nice Instructable. Just a couple of points I hope will be helpful. The purpose of quenching is to try (in the case of an uncontrolled environment i.e DIY heat treatment) and produce a martensitic structure (a very hard but brittle atomic structure) that will be retained at room temperatures. The carbon content of the material will determine the success of this. In the case of your file, it has a high carbon content and that will require less heat than other lower carbon content steels, but as has been stated it will be VERY brittle. You could modify this brittleness by holding the knife with a pair of tongs etc and heating up the HANDLE END ONLY until it is red heat. Remove it from the heat and watch the cutting end change to a 'Straw' colour and immediately quench in oil (tempering). The thicker the oil the better. Also. Swirl the item around in the oil to hasten the quench. I see many internet videos where the operator just plunges the item into the oil. They do not realise that a gas bubble forms around the item being quenched, thereby reducing the effect of tempering. Swirling the item keeps the surface in contact with the oil.I hope this is helpful to anyone having a go at heat treatment of steels.

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  • A very, very nice project. However. If the diameter at the top and the bottom are the same it is a 'helical' staircase. I know most people will call it a 'spiral' staircase, which is incorrect. The only place I have seen a 'spiral' staircase is in a lighthouse, where the structure tapers inwards as it rises.

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  • Glad to be of help. My post was not intended to be a criticism of your post. Having been in the fabrication industry and teaching welder/fabricators, as well as other engineering disciplines how to make things without 'ooops' results, I hope they are useful for other readers who are not aware of possible pitfalls.By the way. Our workshop definition of a skilled person was. 'Someone who could get themselves out of trouble before the management ever reaslised they were in it'!

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  • You need to be aware of two things.1. Not all aluminium is equal. There is 'Hot Worked' (annealed) aluminium which should be capable of being bent in either direction. Then there is 'Wrought' or hard aluminium. This may well fracture on the outside of the bend if this aligns with the direction of 'grain', which will depend on the rolling direction during manufacture 'Cold Rolling'. This is usually identified by its high surface finish. Then there are the 'alloyed' aluminium's which cannot be identified by looks alone. They use terms like 'half hard' of 'fully hard'. These would need to be annealed before bending, sometimes with unpredictable results (depending on the heat treatment methods employed).2. There should be a 'minimum' bending radius which will be determined by the material and…

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    You need to be aware of two things.1. Not all aluminium is equal. There is 'Hot Worked' (annealed) aluminium which should be capable of being bent in either direction. Then there is 'Wrought' or hard aluminium. This may well fracture on the outside of the bend if this aligns with the direction of 'grain', which will depend on the rolling direction during manufacture 'Cold Rolling'. This is usually identified by its high surface finish. Then there are the 'alloyed' aluminium's which cannot be identified by looks alone. They use terms like 'half hard' of 'fully hard'. These would need to be annealed before bending, sometimes with unpredictable results (depending on the heat treatment methods employed).2. There should be a 'minimum' bending radius which will be determined by the material and then it's thickness. 2T or 3T would be a good starting point.If you want the outside dimensions of the finished object (tray or bracket) to be accurate. Use the following formula: 2 x Pi x R x Theta (Number of deg's in the bend) Divided by 360. Assume the radius to be distance from the proposed start of the bend to a point approx 0.5T (maybe 0.4T for aluminium). T = material thickness. This will give you the length of material required for the 'Bend Only'. You can then mark out the bend/s on the flat sheet before any folding.If you are working with thicknesses of 1.6mm and greater. This should be taken into account and will help prevent disappointment if the bending outside edge suffers from surface cracking or bend failure.

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  • That is a neat thing to know. Also. Before you crease the sheet. Pull the back of the sheet across a sharp edge of a piece of furniture keeping it taught. This will 'break the size' in the paper and give you a flexible sanding surface that will not crack if the sheet has to be 'bent'.

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  • That is a neat idea.

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  • Just seen this on a UK website.Defacing Coins of the RealmWe receive e-mails from people asking whether it is illegal to deface coins. We are never quite sure why they need to know, or what they are intending to do. We are quite sure that it is still be illegal to deface coins, particularly current ones.If you need to check on the legality, you could try contacting H.M. Treasury, or asking your local reference library, some libraries have a law library collection, otherwise you could ask a solicitor which will obviously cost money. While we are not in a authoritative position to give you a definitive answer we believe that you should be alright. The authorities quite sensibly are unlikely to prosecute anyone who damages one or two coins, but would probably get upset if someone defaced or …

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    Just seen this on a UK website.Defacing Coins of the RealmWe receive e-mails from people asking whether it is illegal to deface coins. We are never quite sure why they need to know, or what they are intending to do. We are quite sure that it is still be illegal to deface coins, particularly current ones.If you need to check on the legality, you could try contacting H.M. Treasury, or asking your local reference library, some libraries have a law library collection, otherwise you could ask a solicitor which will obviously cost money. While we are not in a authoritative position to give you a definitive answer we believe that you should be alright. The authorities quite sensibly are unlikely to prosecute anyone who damages one or two coins, but would probably get upset if someone defaced or printed an advertising slogan on several million of them. Similarly if your advert encouraged millions of others to do the same, you might have a problem.The lack of response from the Royal Mint probably can probably be taken to indicate their lack of concern, and if you did find yourself facing legal action later, it would certainly be a mitigating factor, if not a defence, to be able to show that you had taken the precaution of asking the mint. Taking this logic a little further, you can probably understand the difficulty for the mint in answering your question. Assuming it is illegal to deface a coin, and also assuming that the Royal Mint are not concerned about you defacing a single coin, they can hardly write to tell you they have no objection, as they would not be allowed to give you permission to break the law.

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  • I am pretty sure it is a criminal offence to deface a 'coin of the realm'!

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  • From one archer to another. That is a very nice piece of work. Recurve bow grips are very personal things. You can buy an expensive one and may still have to modify it to suit 'your' hand position. (I know that from experience)!

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  • "Start with a clean shop. A clean shop is a happy shop"A dirty workshop is a DANGEROUS workshop!

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  • In more ways than one!

    My dad had a hardware store. I learned to drill glass and mirrors while I was still at school. The secret is SLOW drilling and NO Pressure. We used to do it with a carpenters hand brace and masonry drill bits. We never had to make a 'dam'. But we used to cover the intended drill area with some masking tape to prevent the drill from 'skidding' before the bit made its initial indentation.

    In more ways than one!

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  • DennisO22 commented on Berkana's instructable Insulated Sous Vide Kit

    Hello. I purchased mine through eBay. The slow cooker/crock pot does not need a circulator, as it heats the whole base evenly.

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  • DennisO22 commented on Berkana's instructable Insulated Sous Vide Kit

    I made one using a slow cooker (crock pot) and an accurate temperature controller from China. Cost of the temperature controller, less that £10.00 UK. I see the cost of the Anova is £169.00!

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  • Just one thing to be careful of. Do not put your finger through the bearing centre. If the bearing seizes during spinning your finger could be SERIOUSLY damaged. This is not a criticism, just a bit of advice.

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  • Now. That is a great idea.

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  • I wonder how many 'New Year Resolutions' you are going to destroy with this?

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  • Actually my description could have been better. The finished circular mat is really more of a 'spiral' than a circle. But I hope it helps you make the circular ones.

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  • We use to make mats like this when I was at junior school nearly 70 years ago using rafia and string. We did not need to make a frame as we made circular ones.

    I don't have any pictures. But. The construction starts by winding a couple of turns of raffia around the end of the string. This end is the folded to form a very small circle but with the covered end laid alongside and inside the the forming circle. Then a couple of turns of raffia are made around both sections of string to hold them together using a large needle (sack needle). A couple more turns of raffia are made around the INNER next section of string only. Then a couple of turns of raffia are made around both pieces of string to hold that section together. This sequence continues until you have the round mat of your choice. A good example to look at are the 'woven style' baskets yo often see in Arabic countries.

    We use to make mats like this when I was at junior school nearly 70 years ago. We did not need to make a frame as we made circular ones.

    We used to make mats like this using raffia and string when I was at junior school nearly 70 years ago.

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  • DennisO22 commented on Pask Makes's instructable Homemade Bar Clamps

    A nice use for the piece of old railway line.

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  • That is the one I used. I also made a 'Bread Proofer' out of a seed propagator and a fish tank heater using one.

    I made a sous vide cooker using a crock pot (slow cooker) and a cheap temperature controller (£10.00) from china. No need o go to all the trouble of making wiring circuits etc. It works brilliantly. I have been using it for 2 years.

    It is easy to do. Buy a cheap temperature sensor/controller on eBay and place it between the power socket and the crock pot. Set the crock pot to 'high' and let the sensor control the temperature.

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  • Will this hack work with a Fuji compact camera?

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  • Nice looking box. But how much does it weigh? It looks quite a load to carry any distance.

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