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Don Barthel

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22CommentsVancouver BC Canada
Why am I forced to write something about myself?

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  • The PERFECT Dado Jig

    That square you have with the pencil holes, what is its name and where to buy it?

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  • DIY Hanging Storage Shelves With Sliding Doors - Overhead Garage Storage

    I watched the video twice to confirm that the "board on the ceiling" is attached through the ceiling drywall to the joists using three inch wood screws. It seems to me that all the weight of the shelves is hanging via the threads of those screws. That does not sound safe, not even for the weight of the shelves let alone the weight of the contents.Really, the weight of the shelves ought to be supported underneath with posts to the floor. Of course that's not practical, since the posts will be in the way of the space underneath, unless you have a long beam from side wall to side wall (or, in my garage from the side wall to a post beyond the other side of the car). Then what you have is essentially a mini loft.

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  • How to Send a 360 Camera to the Edge of Space

    You have to virtual-point the camera down and 135 degrees around back to the left. The plane is at the middle bottom of this screen capture, its clearer in the video. The whole project is awesome. The Insta 360 camera is awesome.

    Yeah because hydrogen is even lighter than helium. And hydrogen, unlike helium, is plentiful in the universe. Great idea. Except hydrogen is explosive.

    Someone asked in another comment above and got a fixed link.

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  • Don Barthel made the instructable Cat Scratching Pole
    Cat Scratching Pole

    I made this with plywood platforms, outdoor carpeting covering the platforms, and sisal rope wrapped around the vertical uprights. One mistake I made was using outdoor carpet glue to attach the carpet and the sisal rope, it stinks, and it takes a long time (~2 months) to off-gas. I would suggest using white glue instead which you can get by the gallon (four litre jug?) at home improvement stores.The frame was built first and each platform except the top was attached to an upright for strength. The top platform has separate braces that you can see in the photo. Then the carpet was cut larger than the platform and glued then wrapped around the edges and glued and held in place with a plethora of clamps. For the sisal rope I bought 10x 50-foot balls of 1/4 inch and wrapped them after applyin…

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    I made this with plywood platforms, outdoor carpeting covering the platforms, and sisal rope wrapped around the vertical uprights. One mistake I made was using outdoor carpet glue to attach the carpet and the sisal rope, it stinks, and it takes a long time (~2 months) to off-gas. I would suggest using white glue instead which you can get by the gallon (four litre jug?) at home improvement stores.The frame was built first and each platform except the top was attached to an upright for strength. The top platform has separate braces that you can see in the photo. Then the carpet was cut larger than the platform and glued then wrapped around the edges and glued and held in place with a plethora of clamps. For the sisal rope I bought 10x 50-foot balls of 1/4 inch and wrapped them after applying glue to the uprights. When the wrap hits an obstruction like a platform I doubled back and started wrapping in the opposite direction. I did just one ball of rope at a time then clamped the end to hold it and clamped down the whole wrap using off-cut lengths of wood to clamp large areas to bed the rope into the glue, again using lots of clamps.

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  • Bikepacking Bags and Setup on the Cheap - How to Repurpose a Vintage Laptop Bag

    Great idea. The fuel stove and water filter (vs water treatment tablets) are definite luxuries. Those could be ditched to further save weight.

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  • Don Barthel commented on codenova's instructable Hammock Underquilt

    I also have a Hennessey Hammock but the entrance is on the bottom. So how do you plan to enter the hammock if the quilt is in the way?

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  • Don Barthel commented on dustee1000's instructable AnglEase

    I've redrawn the AnglEase using dustee1000's measurements and drawings using OpenSCAD. The .scad and .stl files are here: http://donbarthel.com/AnglEase.zipYou can use the .stl files to create 3D prints. You can use the .scad script files to modify the objects. Programming required because OpenSCAD isn't a traditional CAD software, its a 3D programming language.I used a 5mm bolt in the pivot point.I've modified the Setting Piece to add a 'key' on the bottom that fits in the slot of the Bottom Piece. I printed the Setting Piece on its side using supports. The other pieces don't need supports if you orient them strategically on the print bed.Thanks to dustee1000 for his/her design.

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  • Don Barthel commented on dustee1000's instructable AnglEase

    I programmed an OpenSCAD script to re-imagine the top piece using the measurements you provided. Here's a photo. I'll do the same for the other pieces later in the week and after verifying that they make a reasonably accurate instrument I'll post the script (and STL files) here.

    Also, what's the location of the 5mm hole in the Top Piece? It seems its 5mm from the edge but how far from the top?

    What is the diameter of the holes to drill for the notches? I could not find it listed and I cannot seem to open the DXF files in either Inkscape nor in an in-browser DXF file viewer.

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  • At first I thought that the combined engine and rear wheels platform, separately sprung, was a brilliant idea. Until I remembered the concept of unsprung weight:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unsprung_massFor good road handling, one wants as much of the weight of the vehicle sprung as possible.

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  • Don Barthel commented on silver_a's instructable 4WD Security Robot

    This is a great idea, thanks. It got me thinking, this is what I would want:1. Autonomous robot, moves slowly.2. Onboard GPS so that it stays within a virtual fence.3. Either roams randomly or with a preset route.4. Usual autonomous features like object avoidance, tip-over sensor, etc. Periodically sends location and status via wifi back to a server.5. Moves to a location then stops and checks its surroundings looking for movement. If movement is detected it snaps a photo and sends that by wifi back to a server.6. Monitors its own battery and returns for a charge when low.I guess its kinda like a Roomba or a Mars Rover. Not sure yet how it detects movement in its environment. Infrared like a motion sensing security light? Pauses to take two pictures in a direction and compares the differe…

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    This is a great idea, thanks. It got me thinking, this is what I would want:1. Autonomous robot, moves slowly.2. Onboard GPS so that it stays within a virtual fence.3. Either roams randomly or with a preset route.4. Usual autonomous features like object avoidance, tip-over sensor, etc. Periodically sends location and status via wifi back to a server.5. Moves to a location then stops and checks its surroundings looking for movement. If movement is detected it snaps a photo and sends that by wifi back to a server.6. Monitors its own battery and returns for a charge when low.I guess its kinda like a Roomba or a Mars Rover. Not sure yet how it detects movement in its environment. Infrared like a motion sensing security light? Pauses to take two pictures in a direction and compares the difference between both photos? Or maybe it just uploads the two photos to a server and lets the server do the number crunching. The server could be local to the location that the robot is patrolling.Yeah, I know, there's a ton of software development involved in my wish list. Gotta start with the dream.

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  • I was so excited about making one of these that I didn't consider where I'd put it, I just fired up my 3D printer and started printing. After making half the parts required in brown I noticed that I wouldn't have enough filament to make them all. So I bought some 'wood' filament with wood powder embedded in the plastic, and those match pine very closely. The front uses the wood colored connectors and the back uses the brown connectors.After making all the connectors I have a difficult time figuring out what I'd actually do with the shelves once finished. I ended up deciding that I would put my t-shirts on it since I have too many to fit in my drawers. You see you get a new t-shirt at every tech event, every running race, every promotional event. Many end up as rags but I still have quite …

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    I was so excited about making one of these that I didn't consider where I'd put it, I just fired up my 3D printer and started printing. After making half the parts required in brown I noticed that I wouldn't have enough filament to make them all. So I bought some 'wood' filament with wood powder embedded in the plastic, and those match pine very closely. The front uses the wood colored connectors and the back uses the brown connectors.After making all the connectors I have a difficult time figuring out what I'd actually do with the shelves once finished. I ended up deciding that I would put my t-shirts on it since I have too many to fit in my drawers. You see you get a new t-shirt at every tech event, every running race, every promotional event. Many end up as rags but I still have quite a few that I actually want to wear. I figured that to comfortably fit folded t-shirts, the shelf needs to be 11" wide and 16" deep. That's a problem when using pine boards that are a maximum 11.5" wide (1x12s) - using a board with the edge facing out means the depth of the shelves can't be more that 11.5". But I didn't want to use plywood.So here's what I did. I turned the boards 90 degrees so that the end grain was facing out, using the 11.5 width as the width of my shelves. Depth is now however you cut the boards. So that the shelves weren't too high, I used 1x8s (7.5" wide) as my vertical members. The hexagons look squat but they fit the space better this way. I have enough room to extend the shelves one more hexagon high.Kinda weird huh?

    The filament that I used was "3D Hero Wood PLA" thru Amazon Canada. I didn't have any expansion issues. In fact it printed great using my usual PLA settings. But I print at a relatively slow speed as a rule so that might help.I haven't screwed mine together yet. I plan to plane the ends of the boards to finish them off better then rub them with tung oil as a finish. I'm interested to see how well the wood PLA takes the tung oil, if at all. Then I'll screw everything together with these little brass screws I bought for the job.I used the cheapest pine boards from the home improvement store, not the more expensive furniture quality boards. On the wider 1x12s there's a little bit of a bow in the middle but that didn't seem to negatively affect the fit of the connectors.Thank you fo…

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    The filament that I used was "3D Hero Wood PLA" thru Amazon Canada. I didn't have any expansion issues. In fact it printed great using my usual PLA settings. But I print at a relatively slow speed as a rule so that might help.I haven't screwed mine together yet. I plan to plane the ends of the boards to finish them off better then rub them with tung oil as a finish. I'm interested to see how well the wood PLA takes the tung oil, if at all. Then I'll screw everything together with these little brass screws I bought for the job.I used the cheapest pine boards from the home improvement store, not the more expensive furniture quality boards. On the wider 1x12s there's a little bit of a bow in the middle but that didn't seem to negatively affect the fit of the connectors.Thank you for the great idea for these connectors!

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  • I'm using an Anet A8 3d printer which is a very inexpensive kit printer to print these brackets. I have very good results by clipping an add-on 'borosilicate' glass plate to my print bed which makes it easy to remove my prints once they cool down.

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  • I made this with one strand taken from a 4 strand RJ-11 telephone cable. I made it exactly 3 meters (3*39 inches) long as you recommend, turning it around a wrapping paper tube and a very short tail of wire connecting it to my FM receiver. Voila, all stations crystal clear!

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  • Don Barthel commented on Detectingdragon777's instructable Fm Antenna

    I made this with one strand taken from a 4 strand RJ-11 telephone cable. I made it exactly 3 meters (3*39 inches) long turning it around a wrapping paper tube and a very short tail of wire connecting it to my FM receiver. Voila, all stations crystal clear!

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  • Photo of greenhouse panel clip attached.I think that removing the glass panels to replace with the twin wall polycarbonate is a big waste of money. It would have been cheaper to buy a second brand new greenhouse with the polycarbonate panels included.Pros of polycarbonate: insulating, unbreakable.Pros of glass: longevity, ultimate clarity, cheap to buy, not adding plastic to the environment.I have an aluminum and glass greenhouse that I bought used twenty years ago. It was probably twenty years old already then. I replaced two broken glass panels at low cost. Glass is readily available. I have cracked one since which I covered on the inside with an old mirror. If I break another, I'll start swapping the panels with the north side and add bits of scrap plexiglass or plywood or metal road …

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    Photo of greenhouse panel clip attached.I think that removing the glass panels to replace with the twin wall polycarbonate is a big waste of money. It would have been cheaper to buy a second brand new greenhouse with the polycarbonate panels included.Pros of polycarbonate: insulating, unbreakable.Pros of glass: longevity, ultimate clarity, cheap to buy, not adding plastic to the environment.I have an aluminum and glass greenhouse that I bought used twenty years ago. It was probably twenty years old already then. I replaced two broken glass panels at low cost. Glass is readily available. I have cracked one since which I covered on the inside with an old mirror. If I break another, I'll start swapping the panels with the north side and add bits of scrap plexiglass or plywood or metal road signs to shore them up on the north side. I don't care about the clarity of the panels on the north side.In the winter I throw a large sheet of greenhouse plastic over the whole greenhouse and clip it on. That totally waterproofs the structure. Greenhouse plastic is UV resistant. After twenty years of winters that sheet of plastic is still holding up.I have in the past bought a large roll of clear bubble wrap and pasted it to the glass panels before throwing on the greenhouse plastic in an attempt to further insulate the greenhouse. It worked except the ends of the greenhouse were still not insulated and that plastic deteriorates after a few years. I don't plan on doing that again.

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  • As I understand it, the instructions are to order the printed circuit board then to hand solder surface mounted components to it. As far as I know that's practical, not for me. Please explain.

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