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  • Stackable DIY Painter Pyramids - Homemade

    Nice. If you drill a third hole clean through at the center, you can then pair them up and stack or hang them on a dowel rod. My great-grandfather had a bunch of these in his shop. And after he died, no one could figure out why he made so many(there were over 12 pairs), but they were passed out to all his kids and grand-kids that wanted a pair. Somewhere in a box, I have my fathers' old pair.He used those old square nails instead of screws, and sharpened each point to a nice 45 degree point(which he blunted just a bit). The old guy could be a pain sometimes, but he DID know woodworking - he made cabinets and furniture for over 20 years before a stroke took him quick.

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  • Drake88 commented on bwrussell's instructable Industrial-Style Pipe Wall Shelves1 year ago
    Industrial-Style Pipe Wall Shelves

    Something else the same guy told me is kinda like these pipe shelves.He used copper pipe and end caps, but what he did was by smaller pipe. He used large threaded rods cut to length and screwed the rods into the studs. The copper pipe was just tight enough of a fit over the threaded rod that he could 'hand-tap' the copper pipe on the rod, before he put the pipe on though he put small thin hardwood 'washers' he made on the rods so the copper wouldn't mark up or oxidize marks onto the walls. He also made shallow divots across the shelves so the shelves would be more likely to stay in place no matter how light the item placed on them. The divots line up with the copper pipe to give each shelf a 'resting divot' to sit in.He told he sanded and sprayed a few layers of clear spray paint on eac...

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    Something else the same guy told me is kinda like these pipe shelves.He used copper pipe and end caps, but what he did was by smaller pipe. He used large threaded rods cut to length and screwed the rods into the studs. The copper pipe was just tight enough of a fit over the threaded rod that he could 'hand-tap' the copper pipe on the rod, before he put the pipe on though he put small thin hardwood 'washers' he made on the rods so the copper wouldn't mark up or oxidize marks onto the walls. He also made shallow divots across the shelves so the shelves would be more likely to stay in place no matter how light the item placed on them. The divots line up with the copper pipe to give each shelf a 'resting divot' to sit in.He told he sanded and sprayed a few layers of clear spray paint on each copper pipe before putting it over the rods, but eventually the coating may wear off, he didn't want green copper marks allover the walls. (Copper oxide is a pain to clean off of porous surfaces.)

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  • Drake88 commented on wilgubeast's instructable 9 Unusual Uses for Aspirin1 year ago
    9 Unusual Uses for Aspirin

    I do not like most beer - I just cannot stand the taste of the cheap stuff, and cannot afford the expensive stuff, so no beer for me.I DO prefer hard alcohol though, and I like it in a straight form - no watering down with other fluids for me. I limit myself to one shot(usually whiskey) at the end of a week, although I sometimes will drink a few 'fingers' of scotch or a Rum & Coke(about my limit of mixed drinks I'm willing to stand for) when with friends.I found through(youthful experimentation - ahh the stupid and immortal years...) that I have a high tolerance for alcohol -the proverbial "hollow leg" of legend. I have have never been drunk, and have never experienced a hangover. I also never wish too - which is why I limit my drinking.

    Note for #2(stain remover and most of the ideas in this Instructable that do not involve actual consumption of the pills)Old, and out of date pills would also work for this use(and give a reason to hang on to those old pills instead of wasting time taking them to a pharmacy or Rx recycle location). You just might have to use more pills to get a the same effect. Increase old pills with care when used for human or pet care/

    I know people that take a multi-B vitamin BEFORE going out drinking, then do a vitamin C and aspirin when they get home with a large glass of water.Note the LARGE glass of water. As mentioned, dehydration is a side effect of drinking alcohol, dehydration can also cause headaches - so drinking alcohol is a double 'wammie'. You not only get a headache from the alcohol poisoning(that's what it is), you also insure the possibility of having a headache through the dehydration that drinking alcohol to the point of minor(or more) alcohol poisoning brings. Drinking water will help to remove the processed alcohol from you system, and it will help prevent a possible headache. The more water, the better it will help.

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  • Drake88 commented on bwrussell's instructable Industrial-Style Pipe Wall Shelves1 year ago
    Industrial-Style Pipe Wall Shelves

    A little 'trick' someone once showed me. Those thin metal corner protectors(thin metal angle metal) that protect drywall corners? Use those on the back edge of each shelf to create a slightly higher 'block-wall' to prevent small items or books from sliding past the edge of the shelf. Most of the corner protectors can be purchased in varied sizes - and if you wish - you may even be able to use the plastic kind sold to homeowners wishing to prevent possible damage(they tend to come with pre-applied sticky tape, and may eventually become hard - which could cause the to break). The plastic ones also tend to be thicker than the metal ones.

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  • Build a Simple Box for My EDC With No CNC

    I have made something similar in the past. I used a plunge router and various router bits to create the cavity for the items. It was somewhat messy(LOL), but fun to do. My band saw was too small to past the piece edge-wise through, so I had to come up with an alternative solution. I used a panel of cheap pine for the cavity section(easier to remove), then 'framed' it with cherry sections cut from a piece the same size as the final box. I used am extra fine Japanese hand saw to make the frame sections, and the joints are impossible to see without really good lighting.

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  • Drake88 commented on epiphanyww's instructable Ultimate Shop Fan1 year ago
    Ultimate Shop Fan

    I know someone that had a similar idea. They mounted the fans along one wall at the ceiling, and cut holes for the exiting heated air pulled from the ceiling area. He made some lightweight vent flaps on the outside with a locking tab to close them for winter to prevent insect nests. For the intake side(his garage door), he just cut a few round holes the size of tin cans, and then sealed the tin can sections into the door with silicone. The holes are about a foot from the base of the door, during the summer he uses old wadded-up window screen that he has(I'm not certain how) fixed to be a little bigger then the tin cans, so they have to forced in and cannot be easily force out by animals. During the winter he plugs the holes with sections of that expanding foam spray suck to little wood ...

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    I know someone that had a similar idea. They mounted the fans along one wall at the ceiling, and cut holes for the exiting heated air pulled from the ceiling area. He made some lightweight vent flaps on the outside with a locking tab to close them for winter to prevent insect nests. For the intake side(his garage door), he just cut a few round holes the size of tin cans, and then sealed the tin can sections into the door with silicone. The holes are about a foot from the base of the door, during the summer he uses old wadded-up window screen that he has(I'm not certain how) fixed to be a little bigger then the tin cans, so they have to forced in and cannot be easily force out by animals. During the winter he plugs the holes with sections of that expanding foam spray suck to little wood panels covered with magnets that hold to his old metal door. When not in use, he just flips them and they stick to the door next to the hole come from(he used different sized cans when he made this - it annoys him that he didn't think about it first).The garage door area is well shaded by many large trees nearby so air pulled in is fairly cool unless the summer heat gets really bad.

    One advantage to his semi-kludge design is his entire works shop is basically a fume-hood, and he can use spray paint and other 'stinky' toxic paints/ finishes/ etc. without worry of over exposure. The fans are all on separate switches so he chose the level of draw he wants. He has at least six of the things mounted up there, and during the summer his shop isn't too bad until the temp starts getting over 110 degrees.

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  • I Made a #battlecar Out of My Soccer Mom Minivan.

    I'm not certain if they are a production item, but I have seen roof racks similar to yours with an LED light bar mounted on the front of the rack. Might be expensive, maybe not - but they looked like they could be adjusted for various angles depending on the vehicle.

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  • Drake88 commented on SpecificLove's instructable 8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool1 year ago
    8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool

    Steel wool fragments easily, and when eaten/chewed by mice(or rats) cause sores in the mouth, throat, stomach, and digestive tract. Most mice and rat poison uses a chemical used in human medicine - warfarin. It is a long known blood thinner and in high does can cause ulcers and sores in the digestive tract. Combined with the blood thinning action, the pests hemorrhage and die due to internal bleeding. Not pretty, but they ARE a major pest in human habitation around the world.

    Funny thing here. Those ScotchBite pads are made of the same material that is used in wax buffing pads for powered floor buffers/ cleaners. Those pads can sometimes be bought at hardware stores or janitorial supply stores. They also come in varied degrees of grit/ roughness and are also extremely useful for a number of things - washing dishes(varied types - careful with those non-sticks), cleaning ANYTHING, 'sanding' wood/ metal/ plastic(careful - some can scratch metal), etc. - the uses of those pads are nearly endless, provided you are careful in how you use them.I used to save the core 'hole' that had to be punched out to use them on a buffer. Those pads are incredibly useful - I suggest trying to find some and, with a little experimentation, you will find them to be useful as well. ...

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    Funny thing here. Those ScotchBite pads are made of the same material that is used in wax buffing pads for powered floor buffers/ cleaners. Those pads can sometimes be bought at hardware stores or janitorial supply stores. They also come in varied degrees of grit/ roughness and are also extremely useful for a number of things - washing dishes(varied types - careful with those non-sticks), cleaning ANYTHING, 'sanding' wood/ metal/ plastic(careful - some can scratch metal), etc. - the uses of those pads are nearly endless, provided you are careful in how you use them.I used to save the core 'hole' that had to be punched out to use them on a buffer. Those pads are incredibly useful - I suggest trying to find some and, with a little experimentation, you will find them to be useful as well. Just be careful when cutting with scissors - they WILL dull your scissors, so do NOT use your wife's good sewing scissors(hell to pay will follow).

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  • Drake88 commented on Rachelle3 's instructable Backyard Shou Sugi Ban1 year ago
    Backyard Shou Sugi Ban

    Yes. Charred wood is carbon, which will transfer to other things like clothes, shoe soles, carpet, etc.The worst of charring is normally scrubbed off with heavy brushes, but never to the point of actually exposing the uncharred wood. The charring acts as a barrier to bugs, rain, pretty much everything you don't want on your wood house. It is usually sealed with a light natural oil of some kind after the removal of the charring.I suggest doing some web searching and Google work with this if you plan to use this for something. I think they went a little too deep with the charring on this. I have seen other videos of this, and they use a number of techniques to char the wood without burning too deep.

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  • Drake88 commented on angerheim's instructable BBQ Barrel1 year ago
    BBQ Barrel

    Umm ... something to know - Galvanized steel or aluminum is TOXIC when heated. The fumes can cause flu-like symptoms, extended or repeated exposure is not a good idea for long life.I just say this because the barrel you are appears to be a galvanized steel barrel. It may not be so, but it certainly looks like one in the photos.I do not know if the toxin can be transferred to the food you cook on it - but I do know breathing the fumes when welding is a good way to earn visit to a emergency room if the exposure is high enough.

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  • Drake88 commented on Penolopy Bulnick's instructable 14+ Unusual Uses for Mouthwash1 year ago
    14+ Unusual Uses for Mouthwash

    The alcohol and astringent isn't good for green things though.....

    Vick's vapo-rub or some other petroleum based smelly muscle rub or breathing aid also work well. Just make certain it has no way to enter any air filters - it could block the air.You can also use any 'essential oils or extracts' - but they can get expensive sometimes.

    Try using a flea and tick collar that you cut up into three or four pieces, then screw onto the outside of the door with very small brass screws(they won't rust). This should also help keep ticks, fleas, and possibly even flies away from the doggy door(and maybe the entire door). Just replace them when you change your dog's collar. Also make certain to cut them in the same/ equal lengths so you don't make new holes in the doggy door.There are a number of plants that also repel such pests, talk with a good garden center rep./ florist - they should know which ones to get that would easy to care for.

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  • Drake88 commented on GarageBot's instructable 10 Dollar Diy Sword1 year ago
    10 Dollar Diy Sword

    If you use the angle grinder once you get one - be careful to wear eye protection ALL the time, and a heavy(or leather) apron when using a wire-brush wheel - those little wires can come loose. When they do, they can fly a good distance, but they can also STICK into things close by - like you. It isn't a fun experience having one or two of those things pulled out....

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  • Drake88 commented on Hazard™'s instructable Cracking Single Dial Combination Locks1 year ago
    Cracking Single Dial Combination Locks

    Yeah... That would be a sign my brain is over-crowded with too much info and getting old. I use the wrong word for things sometimes....

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  • Drake88 commented on GarageBot's instructable 10 Dollar Diy Sword1 year ago
    10 Dollar Diy Sword

    That bar steel will not hold an edge for long. Try cutting cardboard boxes with it for about 10 to 15 minutes. Your edge will be dull and mostly useless.Far simpler to use use an old leaf-spring from a pick-up tuck or car. The leaf spring will be made form spring steel, which has more carbon in it and that makes the steel hols an edge far longer. You will likely need an angle grinder to shape and place an edge on the blade, but you need to be careful to not lets the steel get too hot, or you will lose the tempering - which will cause the edge to fail.I suggest doing some reading on tempering and annealing of steel and other metals.

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  • Drake88 commented on wilgubeast's instructable 9 Unusual Uses for Toothpaste1 year ago
    9 Unusual Uses for Toothpaste

    On cheap disks(CD,DVD,bluRay,etc.), the top side of the disk IS the recording medium - and it may not have ANY protection from the stray pencil or pen to prevent getting ruined by a scratch. If that medium does have scratch, odds are good you have a useless disk in your hands. There is a slight chance that area scratched hold no important data required to use whatever you had saved, but - the larger the scratch, the more data gets lost. Be EXTREMELY careful with factory disks - especially those 'el cheepo' software disks offered for $10 or less - they often have those cheap disks. Best way to tell if you have a ruined disk? Try holding the disk top-side towards a lamp - if you can see a small thin line of light anywhere from the filled in edge to where the label stops near the center ho...

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    On cheap disks(CD,DVD,bluRay,etc.), the top side of the disk IS the recording medium - and it may not have ANY protection from the stray pencil or pen to prevent getting ruined by a scratch. If that medium does have scratch, odds are good you have a useless disk in your hands. There is a slight chance that area scratched hold no important data required to use whatever you had saved, but - the larger the scratch, the more data gets lost. Be EXTREMELY careful with factory disks - especially those 'el cheepo' software disks offered for $10 or less - they often have those cheap disks. Best way to tell if you have a ruined disk? Try holding the disk top-side towards a lamp - if you can see a small thin line of light anywhere from the filled in edge to where the label stops near the center hole, you probably have a bad disk that is NOT fixable.The PC reads the disks from the bottom side with a laser, starting at the inside of the disk moving out. Some spots(microscopic spots) are reflective others aren't - and those are the 1's and 0's of digital language. If the clear plastic is scratched, the laser can be refracted or misaligned enough to be unable to properly read the needed data. Using a disk repair solution(some toothpastes DO work for this), a circular motion can smooth out the deeper scratches quicker. However you should ALWAYS use a straight-line finishing/ polishing motion from the center hole to the edge of the disk to finish the job. It reduces the chances of a curved micro-scratch that can be really hard to find for fixing.

    Heh. I don't even HAVE a TV anymore. I use my PC and it's monitor for watching the few shows I wish to waste time watching. I agree with you about the quality of TV shows, it seems like all the studios have their heads firmly placed where the sun no longer shines, because they keep trying the same old plot tactics to increase viewers - and then keep them watching.I mostly watch British or other foreign murder mysteries or police shows now, the American studios cannot seem to figure out how to make a show interesting with repeating dialog or events from other shows. It's all copy, paste, and "Action!" for most American shows. American sitcoms make me want to throw things at the screen, so I quit watching those years ago.

    Use caution when cleaning jewelry - some toothpastes can remove thin electroplated metals from the base metal.You can try it on a small area(like the inside of a ring) first and if there is no effect after rubbing on and washing the toothpaste off, you may be safe using it for cleaning that one piece.Basically, never use if think you think your jewelry might be cheap, fakes, or the costume stuff.

    It does work, you just have to save the whitening toothpaste for when you are trying to fix a bad scratch - most whitening toothpastes have small bits of granular 'stuff' for abrasive. It can be anything from glass/sand to volcanic pumice. Some brands may also have chemicals designed to leech or bleach the dyes, stains, and smoke from teeth - these can sometimes do nasty things to a data disk, so you kinda have to experiment if you wish to try using the whitening toothpastes. I usually use a toothpaste made for people who have poor gums. These have very little amounts of abrasives and nearly zero or the chemicals for removing stains and such. They may take longer to repair that disk, but they also will not ruin it, either.

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  • How to EASILY Identify Rocks and Minerals

    Good guide! I only have one small thing to say - if any rocks happened to picked up from large piles near old site of human habitation(ghost towns) be VERY careful about the taste test. Some of those old ghost towns happen to be built on or near mine sites, and some of those sites could have possible chemical toxins around them from the mining. Just a thought......

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  • Drake88 commented on macobt's instructable How to Make Uncle Fester Magic Light Bulb1 year ago
    How to Make Uncle Fester Magic Light Bulb

    Youtube Video no longer availible.......

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  • A Waterproof Energy Saving Light Bulb Made From a Recycle Plastic Bottle

    My worry is the fact that those CFL bulbs can get hot from the ballast inside the 'neck' and base of the light. Some CFLs I've had get nearly too hot to touch if left on for a long time(over 5 hours). If they get that hot, I would imagine the plastic soda bottle would begin to show some signs of heat warping. Whether it would start a fire ... I can't say. Maybe if a CFL bulb was left on constantly in such a case, the bottle could warp to point that the plastic would come into direct contact with the bulb, which would increase the heat transfer, making a fire possible...

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  • Drake88 commented on wilgubeast's instructable 11 Unusual Uses for Baby Oil1 year ago
    11 Unusual Uses for Baby Oil

    Umm..... about #11 using it to polish/shine wood furniture....Maybe not such a good idea. Any oil not absorbed by the wood will stain and mark clothing that touches the oiled wood. Also, wood kinda . . . breathes - it changes with heat, air pressure, humidity, etc. - it could 'release' some of the oil at a later date.Not certain what baby oil would do to delicate fabrics like ... say silk - but I'm sure it probably isn't good.

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  • Drake88 commented on annelynn's instructable ShelfChecker - a Smart Bookshelf1 year ago
    ShelfChecker - a Smart Bookshelf

    The scanner, maybe. But not the shelf with all it's wonders. I have over 3,000 books. Might even need a PC for that.....

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  • How to Make Salsa De Molcajete: an Authentic Mexican Salsa

    Any decent foodie or kitchen/chef supply shop should have some.Molcajete and piedra = mortar and pestle. Commonly used tools in the kitchens, alchemists', and chemistry shops/labs since ancient times. One of oldest known tools purposely made for a single specific use - grinding and combining different items together without use of extreme heat or pressure. Many compounding pharmacies have at least one set of these for mixing special drug orders. Using a mixer electric or hand powered sometimes just doesn't achieve the proper results....

    P.S. they have been made out of just about every hard material mankind has ever used, and are still being made from various materials today.The harder the material, the finer the grind(and more mixed) things become. Think of them as sandpaper used to mix and combine ingredients, the finer the grind - the smoother the blend.

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  • Drake88 commented on seamster's instructable Tune Up Your Lawn Mower!1 year ago
    Tune Up Your Lawn Mower!

    Part of the problem is that some cheaper lawn mowers are(intentionally or not) designed to be replaced every few years. Trying to buy parts or do much more than the most basic maintenance will quickly cost more than the mower itself did.I've actually seen a couple of import lawn mowers from China. On one the deck is made from thin metal(I'm not sure what, but it is magnetic) and has a simple metal frame to support it that has the wheels attached to corner portions of the frame. The other one is basically the same, except the deck is actually a thick plastic. The motor sits on the frame while the deck is screwed to the frame in a few locations. If the user were to hit a rock or piece of metal while mowing, I wouldn't trust either deck to prevent the object from cracking or passing though...

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    Part of the problem is that some cheaper lawn mowers are(intentionally or not) designed to be replaced every few years. Trying to buy parts or do much more than the most basic maintenance will quickly cost more than the mower itself did.I've actually seen a couple of import lawn mowers from China. On one the deck is made from thin metal(I'm not sure what, but it is magnetic) and has a simple metal frame to support it that has the wheels attached to corner portions of the frame. The other one is basically the same, except the deck is actually a thick plastic. The motor sits on the frame while the deck is screwed to the frame in a few locations. If the user were to hit a rock or piece of metal while mowing, I wouldn't trust either deck to prevent the object from cracking or passing though the deck....One 'advantage' to those cheap mowers - they are usually a lot easier to push because they are so light-weight.

    An old mower of my parents(Sears) that I used to mow our lawn with had a oil drain plug that was above the deck(which had no hole to access the plug). My father(machinist/mechanic) took it to work one day. It came back a week later with a hole in the deck and a short extension tube(less than 2") that had the old plug hanging just even with the deck. He also re-conditioned the carburetor, fixed the cracked deck near a wheel(welded), and sharpened the blade using the $80,000 ruby-stone grinder they had for polishing certain parts. I'm not certain, but he might have even heat-treated the blade a bit - it didn't need sharpening for nearly two years ....

    My dad does most of his own mower work. He does the blade twice a year(mid-season and end-season), and the oil is done at the start of the season(when needed - buys expensive synthetic oil so he doesn't have to change it every year). The filters(gas and air) get done at the start of season, the air filter gets a second check mid-season(we get a lot of dust and junk sometimes).

    Some have the plug, some do not. But if you do have an easy way to work under the deck while it is level, draining the oil using the bottom plug can be a pain(and even dangerous if you try removing it while the blade is on).Some manuals even suggest the 'tilt' method because it is less problematic. If you cross-thread that bottom plug when replacing it, there is often NO possible way to fix it. I know someone who did this once with a 1 year old expensive mower - he ended up having a machinist re-thread the drain, and make a new plug for the new drain-hole(the machinist happened to be his son, which cost the owner little, except some pride for messing it up in the first place).

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  • Drake88 commented on Befferoni and Cheese's instructable Fried Mozzarella Sticks1 year ago
    Fried Mozzarella Sticks

    My father's advice was "Be careful and certain of your knife control, and do not worry about making mistakes. You will learn not to make mistakes in your cuts as you learn". That was some ofthe best advice for a 9 year old kid making his first try at filleting a fish. Buy/use a fish that you are comfortable holding or carrying - this will prevent problems later(heavy or small fish have their own issues when trying to fillet them, save those for after you have learned the skill well). There videos on youtube and possibly even instructables showing how to correctly fillet a fish. My advice is follow my fathers and to watch the videos at least three or four times before trying to fillet you first fish. Using steel safety gloves may also be a good idea, depending on how confiden...

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    My father's advice was "Be careful and certain of your knife control, and do not worry about making mistakes. You will learn not to make mistakes in your cuts as you learn". That was some ofthe best advice for a 9 year old kid making his first try at filleting a fish. Buy/use a fish that you are comfortable holding or carrying - this will prevent problems later(heavy or small fish have their own issues when trying to fillet them, save those for after you have learned the skill well). There videos on youtube and possibly even instructables showing how to correctly fillet a fish. My advice is follow my fathers and to watch the videos at least three or four times before trying to fillet you first fish. Using steel safety gloves may also be a good idea, depending on how confident you are with a knife. Remember that fillet knives are SUPPOSED to be super sharp(because fish flesh is delicate) and go slow. Speed is a learned skill for this task. When I learned this, I didn't have one of those expensive steel gloves(they cost a bit of change about 40 years ago). I also managed to cut myself on my first try - but that also taught me more respect for a fillet blade.

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  • Drake88 commented on Befferoni and Cheese's instructable Fried Mozzarella Sticks1 year ago
    Fried Mozzarella Sticks

    Excellent Instructable! Far too many people these days have zero idea of how to actually cook beyond 'toss it on a pizza pan, place in oven at x temperature for xx minutes'.My dad took me hunting/ fishing, so I know the process for skinning/descaling my food animals. Mom taught how to cook, until I started 'playing with the recipes' at age 10. I'll admit to being a lazy person and buying far too much prepped frozen foods at the grocery store - but I still know the skills, even if I rarely use them.P.S. - One secret of game meat(not most fish, though), is to soak the game in a bath of cold water for at least one hour before cooking. It helps to remove the 'gamey' taste that most people do not like - some get used to the taste of it though.

    Do NOT try to use peanut oil. It can cause a transfer of peanut taste to the cheese. Avoid meat based cooking oils for the same reason. A mixture of olive and vegetable oil(about 35/65 ratio) works good for pan frying, but you have watch the oil for burning, or the sticks will taste of burnt oil.If you deep fry these, use a temperature of 350 to 375 degrees for about 3 to 4 minutes. Keep an eye on them as they deep fry, because the cheese can melt into the oil and leave you with an empty shell of fried breading. If you see cheese coming out of the breading remove quickly(you may need to check your temperature, or you have allowed the cheese to thaw before frying).There is way to bake these using sprayed olive oil on the sticks, but I never really a had much success with the process. If ...

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    Do NOT try to use peanut oil. It can cause a transfer of peanut taste to the cheese. Avoid meat based cooking oils for the same reason. A mixture of olive and vegetable oil(about 35/65 ratio) works good for pan frying, but you have watch the oil for burning, or the sticks will taste of burnt oil.If you deep fry these, use a temperature of 350 to 375 degrees for about 3 to 4 minutes. Keep an eye on them as they deep fry, because the cheese can melt into the oil and leave you with an empty shell of fried breading. If you see cheese coming out of the breading remove quickly(you may need to check your temperature, or you have allowed the cheese to thaw before frying).There is way to bake these using sprayed olive oil on the sticks, but I never really a had much success with the process. If wish to try it, look for 'oven/baked fried fries' on some the online recipes sites - the process is the same. The cheese just doesn't quite have the correct taste, and it throws the overall flavor off.(I have ten years of food service - all working in the kitchen. I may not be a trained chef, but in ten years you can learn a LOT, if you are willing to. Plus, my good ol' mom taught me how to cook starting at age 7, until I decided I wanted to learn on my own when I was 10. That was when I started cooking meals for the family every now and then - some were successful, some not so good, but I learned from every meal I ever cooked.)

    This process works with pretty much ANY kind of food, you might want to eat fried - you just have to experiment with the oil temperature and frying time. It's always best to prep this sort of stuff up a few days(up to a month or so) ahead of when you plan to fry them. It helps when the food is completely, totally frozen - this helps to prevent the food from over-cooking or boiling out into the oil, leaving you a fried bread shell behind.

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  • Drake88 commented on trev25's instructable How to Remove a Dent From Wood1 year ago
    How to Remove a Dent From Wood

    The heat gun may evaporate more of the water than an iron would, you might have to use more water during the process

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  • Drake88 commented on randofo's instructable $2 Bill Pad1 year ago
    $2 Bill Pad

    Not certain about Canada, but in the US any bill that has is at least over 50% and still showing a serial number can be taken to ANY bank for replacement - which ... could be taken as proof of it still being legal tender.The bill MUST be over half of the bill, though to prevent someone from trying to double their money. I think there is a requirement for larger denominations for the owners' name, though(I've never tried ripping a $50 to find out).

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  • Drake88 commented on Hazard™'s instructable Cracking Single Dial Combination Locks1 year ago
    Cracking Single Dial Combination Locks

    Yep - brain farts. I gets 'em cause my brain is wired weird(un-diagnosed ADD and dyslexia about 35 years ago). Being something of JOAT(Jack Of All Trades) and a very curious person doesn't help much. I literally get curious about something, and I will read and research everything I can about it - until the interest passes.

    He's the shorter locksmith version - "Locks keep honest people honest"Been around for YEARS, I first remember hearing it used by one of my grandfathers in the early 70's.

    YEPPERS!!!!

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  • Drake88 commented on Marsh's instructable How to Make Retractable Casters!1 year ago
    How to Make Retractable Casters!

    You might want to consider welding a flat metal plate on the bearing plate to prevent it from warping or bending due to the way it was pressed out during manufacturing it. It would also prevent eventual wear from the locking pedal grinding against that bearing plate.

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  • With This Mailbox You Will Never Miss Your Post Again

    The USPS is considered to be an 'independent' branch of the US Federal Government, it is overseen by the US Congress(which means it has to follow guidelines and rule made by Congress). This has benefits and problems. Criminal activities against the USPS are considered to Federal crimes(which tend to have harsher penalties than State penalties do), but the USPS is forced to follow rules and payroll/ working hour guidelines set by the US Congress(the rules can be foolish and even stupid)

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  • Drake88 commented on cyrzee's instructable Baseboard Barn Door & Hardware1 year ago
    Baseboard Barn Door & Hardware

    Nice! I know you were making a "barn door", but wonder why you felt the need to add the trim-work to create the 'style' of a barn door. I have seen a number of old rolling barn doors that used stacked 2x4s(or other wood) to create a sort of 'chopping block' style door. The most detailed one I ever saw had a deep channel cut at the top for the metal-work to sit in. (There were three pulleys, all connected to a single two inch wide flat piece of 1/4 inch steel that was centered inside the wood at the top of the door, with large iron or steel bolts at each 'strap' under the pulley).That door ran very close to wall behind it, and had a base guide along the wall to prevent it from 'swinging' into the wall. The door never really completely left the guide even when fully open due it'...

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    Nice! I know you were making a "barn door", but wonder why you felt the need to add the trim-work to create the 'style' of a barn door. I have seen a number of old rolling barn doors that used stacked 2x4s(or other wood) to create a sort of 'chopping block' style door. The most detailed one I ever saw had a deep channel cut at the top for the metal-work to sit in. (There were three pulleys, all connected to a single two inch wide flat piece of 1/4 inch steel that was centered inside the wood at the top of the door, with large iron or steel bolts at each 'strap' under the pulley).That door ran very close to wall behind it, and had a base guide along the wall to prevent it from 'swinging' into the wall. The door never really completely left the guide even when fully open due it's width, Whoever made it had used different types of wood in the crafting of the door, because the wood only had linseed or tung oil on it, and nearly every piece was a different shade and color.

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  • Clear Sink Clog - FAST, NO BUCKETS, NO CHEMICALS

    Vinegar and baking soda works too. The vinegar is slightly acidic which can help cut through any soap goo. If you use Cider Vinegar, the room the sink is in will smell like Cider Vinegar for a day or so too, which isn't a bad smell(and it may also help cover any smell of the goo should it be stinky).

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  • Drake88 commented on Kandrix's instructable Wooden Fidget Hand Spinner under $11 year ago
    Wooden Fidget Hand Spinner under $1

    Some people, usually creative or active types, can actually think and focus BETTER when messing around(fidgeting) with something in their hands or on a table. This sometimes helps me and sometimes it doesn't, it depends on what I happen to be thinking about(for me anyway).It's is a known psychological fact, and is often used my many people to focus during meetings, tests, etc. I got in trouble in school for doing this during tests, because a teacher thought I had answers printed or written on my "little toy".

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  • Drake88 commented on Adam Gabbert's instructable 90° Magnetic Hand Saw Guide1 year ago
    90° Magnetic Hand Saw Guide

    You could make the magnets part of how the shield is held to the square. Just drill the holes through the shield and use flat headed screws that have the same head-size as the magnet holes. Then just allow two of the magnets to 'sit' on the screw heads.

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  • Drake88 commented on JustAddSharks's instructable DIY Heng Lamp1 year ago
    DIY Heng Lamp

    One way to make a wooden ball - Use wooden dowel of the wood you prefer, then cut about 2 to 3(or more, it depends on the size of the ball) inches off. This will become your ball, eventually. Then angle-cut each end so that you have a start at rounding each end off to form a perfect 'dome'. Then - using any drill, drill press, or basically anything that can hold the dowel and turn it at a high rpm, carefully use rasps, files, and sandpaper/emery cloth to round the 'dome' at each end. Once the dome is finished, cut each off leaving at least 1/4 inch of the straight sides. Using a Forstner bit, core each dome WITHOUT cutting through. Carefully sand the 'extra' sides(used to hold the piece in a vise for drilling) down to the point where the curvature is just beginning to start. Glue the ha...

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    One way to make a wooden ball - Use wooden dowel of the wood you prefer, then cut about 2 to 3(or more, it depends on the size of the ball) inches off. This will become your ball, eventually. Then angle-cut each end so that you have a start at rounding each end off to form a perfect 'dome'. Then - using any drill, drill press, or basically anything that can hold the dowel and turn it at a high rpm, carefully use rasps, files, and sandpaper/emery cloth to round the 'dome' at each end. Once the dome is finished, cut each off leaving at least 1/4 inch of the straight sides. Using a Forstner bit, core each dome WITHOUT cutting through. Carefully sand the 'extra' sides(used to hold the piece in a vise for drilling) down to the point where the curvature is just beginning to start. Glue the halves together to create a ball, making certain to keep the wood grain of both halves going the same way - you may need to do some finish sanding to make it look or feel better once the glue has set.

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  • Drake88 commented on tgdula's instructable A knife from a shot out M1 rifle1 year ago
    A knife from a shot out M1 rifle

    One other purpose for the notch - it can extend the use of the knife. With age and repeated sharpening, eventually the edge meets up with the portion of the metal that hasn't been thinned to shape the blade. When this happens it can be difficult to get the edge completely sharp near that point. I have a few knives that have reached this point, and what I do is use a Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel to cut a small notch in where the tang meets the thinned metal blade. Some of my knives have been handed down in my family from father to son, one is over 200 years old - and strangely enough, it holds the best edge of all my knives. Legend is, it was forged by my great-great-great-grandfather when he was boy being trained as a blacksmith. I know that the scales have been replaced twice, and ...

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    One other purpose for the notch - it can extend the use of the knife. With age and repeated sharpening, eventually the edge meets up with the portion of the metal that hasn't been thinned to shape the blade. When this happens it can be difficult to get the edge completely sharp near that point. I have a few knives that have reached this point, and what I do is use a Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel to cut a small notch in where the tang meets the thinned metal blade. Some of my knives have been handed down in my family from father to son, one is over 200 years old - and strangely enough, it holds the best edge of all my knives. Legend is, it was forged by my great-great-great-grandfather when he was boy being trained as a blacksmith. I know that the scales have been replaced twice, and that it was taken to Europe by my grandfather during WWII, but much more than that can't really be proven.

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  • 5 Times The Trash to a Single Treasure Knife (54TASTK)

    Great looking knife! Ya got my votes!

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  • Drake88 commented on Adam Gabbert's instructable Wooden Knuckle Dusters1 year ago
    Wooden Knuckle Dusters

    Sorta off topic, but also not. Nearly ANYTHING can be dangerous or even lethal in the hands of someone trained or just naturally talented to think that way. For instance, I can think of at least THREE ways a simple feather can used to cause severe, if not lethal, damage to another human - without much modification(like glue).The simple fact is, there are a number of people in this world who would like to make the world a 'safe place' for everyone. The sad part is, to really accomplish this goal, you need the complete and total co-operation of every human on the planet - which is NEVER going to happen.I prefer to be someone who hopes for the best, but plans for the worst - especially when interaction with other humans occurs. Oh, by the way - the bloody-mindedness? It comes natural to me...

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    Sorta off topic, but also not. Nearly ANYTHING can be dangerous or even lethal in the hands of someone trained or just naturally talented to think that way. For instance, I can think of at least THREE ways a simple feather can used to cause severe, if not lethal, damage to another human - without much modification(like glue).The simple fact is, there are a number of people in this world who would like to make the world a 'safe place' for everyone. The sad part is, to really accomplish this goal, you need the complete and total co-operation of every human on the planet - which is NEVER going to happen.I prefer to be someone who hopes for the best, but plans for the worst - especially when interaction with other humans occurs. Oh, by the way - the bloody-mindedness? It comes natural to me, even as a kid, I was fascinated with weapons. One the most basic is the simple weight held in a hand during a conflict.

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  • HAND FORGED Cold Chisel, From a Rusty Old Coil Spring

    I made one once in my high school, welding shop class. We started with a 6 inch piece of 1/2 inch rebar, which we then welded onto one end to harden the metal and add some of welding rod material which had more carbon in it. We then heated it hammered the end down and cooled it before grinding it to form the chisel edge. After one more session of heat treatment to harden it we placed the finishing edge on the end of the chisel. Mine was one of the top three in the class - it was able to cut 3/8 inch sheet steel either flat or on edge without deforming the cutting edge.I still have it somewhere in the bottom of a toolbox. I don't use it much because it is sort of over the top for most things I do.

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  • Drake88 commented on ambercollective's instructable How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance1 year ago
    How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance

    Also - make certain to remove(or replace) the emergency lights! Some areas have laws that restrict the use and mounting of these to certified or licensed organizations/ officials. Without such permits/licenses the driver and/or owner may be liable for fine, fees, and possible jail time.The easiest way is to just remove/replace all strobe functions with normal fixtures. Many units do not even require much work - all the has to be removed is a central light controller unit, and then some rewiring work may be required(if you wish to have the lights functioning. If having the lights work isn't your thing, then all you have to do is remove the switches to operate the lights.

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  • Drake88 commented on stvnishere's instructable The pocket grill1 year ago
    The pocket grill

    If you had a tap&die set that matched the treading on the spokes, you could extend the threading on those four spokes so that either small nuts(with washers) or just the spoke nipples could be used to 'lock' the 'stand' spokes into place. It would help to prevent the spokes from coming out of the copper tube and increase the stability of the entire thing.

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  • How to Unlock Your Car in 30 Seconds

    For those with fob-only(HAH!) doors - there are a few ways to make or buy cheap copies to open your door. About the "HAH!" - many car makers still install a keyed lock on your car door. They just hide the key-hole under a plastic fairing(minus the hole to access the key slot) that fits over door handle.

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  • Drake88 commented on Black Beard Projects's instructable Blacksmithing Forge1 year ago
    Blacksmithing Forge

    Some may be, but many are made from steel or(in the case of older cars or even farm equipment) iron. You are probably more likely to encounter aluminum(or other non-steel metals) in cars made after 1990. My advice is to use the oldest vehicle you can find for your parts, as not only are they likely to be rusted, less costly(unless you find something valued as 'antique'), and most likely to be made from steel.

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  • Drake88 commented on Black Beard Projects's instructable Blacksmithing Forge1 year ago
    Blacksmithing Forge

    For a larger coal pit area, you could use the transmission or differential housing from just about any car or truck. The size would depend on the vehicle and the type of use it was intended for.

    Base opening is for ash and residue the falls down the air tube. Without it, the tube would eventually fill up with debris and the air blower would not work.

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  • Drake88 commented on Itsatrav's instructable Hex Nut D61 year ago
    Hex Nut D6

    Just an idea, but using bronze, brass, or copper nuts might also add to the 'effect'. Might also want to use acrylic model paint instead of the spray paint to make the pips really stand out.Also, if you could use two hex bolts for the 'end' pips. Just measure the length of one bolt so that it will meet the other in the middle of one pip(nut). Applying a little super-glue or locktite to each nuts location on the bolt(and a drop or two for the connector nut) before screwing them down should insure they will not move(or separate in the case of the connector nut) for quite some time.

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  • Drake88 commented on tlp801's instructable Trash-Vac!!1 year ago
    Trash-Vac!!

    Not trying to be an inventor's buzz-kill, but I've always used a trick I learned from my first job, a local burger joint(not a chain or franchise).First spray the inside of the empty can with a nice smelling disinfectant(Lysol works), so that you get the sides of the can a little damp.(This also keeps the can smelling nice - even in a fast-food restaurant)Second take one trash bag, fully expand it(OUTSIDE of the can). Then grab the sealed end of the bag, and 'toss' the bottom end of the bag into the trash can without holding the bag anywhere else. As you spread the open end over the can edge, blow hard into the bag to cause it to inflate(forcing it into contact with the can sides). Once the bag is fully expanded, tie off the bag so it cannot fall inside the can.Opening the bag first rem...

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    Not trying to be an inventor's buzz-kill, but I've always used a trick I learned from my first job, a local burger joint(not a chain or franchise).First spray the inside of the empty can with a nice smelling disinfectant(Lysol works), so that you get the sides of the can a little damp.(This also keeps the can smelling nice - even in a fast-food restaurant)Second take one trash bag, fully expand it(OUTSIDE of the can). Then grab the sealed end of the bag, and 'toss' the bottom end of the bag into the trash can without holding the bag anywhere else. As you spread the open end over the can edge, blow hard into the bag to cause it to inflate(forcing it into contact with the can sides). Once the bag is fully expanded, tie off the bag so it cannot fall inside the can.Opening the bag first removes the static electricity/ vacuum effect that makes it so hard to open the bag while inside the can. Spraying the inside of the can with disinfectant does two things - first, it makes the can smell better and second, the liquid causes the bag to 'stick' to the can sides while the bag is inflated(which insures that no folds or twists will 'catch' trash later and possibly cause the bag to rip/split).

    Not trying to be an inventor's buzz-kill, but I've always used a trick I learned from my first job, a local burger joint(not a chain or franchise).First spray the inside of the empty can with a nice smelling disinfectant(Lysol works), so that you get the sides of the can a little damp.(This also keeps the can smelling nice - even in a fast-food restaurant)Second take one trash bag, fully expand it(OUTSIDE of the can). Then grab the sealed end of the bag, and 'toss' the bottom end of the bag into the trash can without hold in the bag anywhere else. As you spread the open end over the can edge, blow hard into the bag to cause it to inflate(forcing it into contact with the can sides). Once the bag is fully expanded, tie off the bag so it cannot fall inside the can.Opening the bag first rem...

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    Not trying to be an inventor's buzz-kill, but I've always used a trick I learned from my first job, a local burger joint(not a chain or franchise).First spray the inside of the empty can with a nice smelling disinfectant(Lysol works), so that you get the sides of the can a little damp.(This also keeps the can smelling nice - even in a fast-food restaurant)Second take one trash bag, fully expand it(OUTSIDE of the can). Then grab the sealed end of the bag, and 'toss' the bottom end of the bag into the trash can without hold in the bag anywhere else. As you spread the open end over the can edge, blow hard into the bag to cause it to inflate(forcing it into contact with the can sides). Once the bag is fully expanded, tie off the bag so it cannot fall inside the can.Opening the bag first removes the static electricity/ vacuum effect that makes it so hard to open the bag while inside the can. Spraying the inside of the can with disinfectant does two things - first, it makes the can smell better and second, the liquid causes the bag to 'stick' to the can sides while the bag is inflated(which insures that no folds or twists will 'catch' trash later and possibly cause the bag to rip/split).

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  • Drake88 commented on iceng's instructable Wing Nut Key Power Driver1 year ago
    Wing Nut  Key  Power Driver

    I saw one made from an old steel pipe. The guy had cut out a couple of sections(about 25% of the pipe end, then used 'heat to soften the pipe'(he said), and then flattened three inches or so of the pipe end in such a way that the remaining two 'castillations'(like on top edge of a castle) were sitting to one side of each other with about 1/2 an inch between them. He did the same thing with the other end of the pipe only flattening in the other direction, and drilling a hole for a screwdriver or other tool to be used as a lever. I really wish I had taken pictures of this thing, it was about 8 inches long total, and once you knew what it was used for was a pretty cool tool design. Without knowing what it's use was, I had though it was just some scrap junk. I was corrected in my thinking p...

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    I saw one made from an old steel pipe. The guy had cut out a couple of sections(about 25% of the pipe end, then used 'heat to soften the pipe'(he said), and then flattened three inches or so of the pipe end in such a way that the remaining two 'castillations'(like on top edge of a castle) were sitting to one side of each other with about 1/2 an inch between them. He did the same thing with the other end of the pipe only flattening in the other direction, and drilling a hole for a screwdriver or other tool to be used as a lever. I really wish I had taken pictures of this thing, it was about 8 inches long total, and once you knew what it was used for was a pretty cool tool design. Without knowing what it's use was, I had though it was just some scrap junk. I was corrected in my thinking pretty quickly by the old guy, however.

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  • Drake88 commented on rsmaudsley's instructable Homemade Thumbscrew1 year ago
    Homemade Thumbscrew

    Aww .. ya beat me to it. I've been using this trick ever since I was around 8 years old, when I helped I dad make a stand for a little drill press he bought. He was working as a machinist at the time, and showed me the trick. It does help some to use a little sandpaper on the end threads after removing the nut though.

    One thing about Loctite and other threadlocker compounds - eventually they will fail. Sometimes it can take dozens of years, but it will happen. Making a small cut in the end of the screw after putting the wingnut on, then screwing the wingnut up to the end, and using a punch to spread the end of is another way to lock the wing nut permanently. Another good way is to use a propane torch to melt some solder into the threads - you don't have to braze it, just using some non-lead solder usually does the trick.

    Not hard to find one in a well stocked hardware store - look for those little external cut-off pinch-screws used on thin hose. First time I saw one, I wondered why we stocked torture devices in hardware stores(I was about 12 an taking a course on the Middle Ages, and had just finished a report on the Spanish Inquisition). I found out later they were used to reduce or cut-off the flow of liquids in thin flexible hoses. Made for a funny conversation with my father at the time, though.

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  • Drake88 commented on east fork spring's instructable DIY Sutures2 years ago
    DIY Sutures

    Something I have done in the past - newskin(superglue) and then steri-strips. Depending on the length of the wound this might work and might not. Usually I use the steri-strips first, then glue the areas between the strips carefully so the glue does NOT get on the strips. I also try to keep the area covered with at least two layers of heavy gauze(or some flexible bandages -placed to hold the wound closed- covered over with another large plastic backed bandage).Also - pain killers are okay, but a local anesthetic is better - try using some of the OTC stuff they have for toothaches(Lidocaine) that is usually in the mouthwash/toothpaste isle of the local pharmacy/ store. Try not to get it directly into the wound - just rub it in gently with a *gloved*(do NOT want numbed finger doing stitch...

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    Something I have done in the past - newskin(superglue) and then steri-strips. Depending on the length of the wound this might work and might not. Usually I use the steri-strips first, then glue the areas between the strips carefully so the glue does NOT get on the strips. I also try to keep the area covered with at least two layers of heavy gauze(or some flexible bandages -placed to hold the wound closed- covered over with another large plastic backed bandage).Also - pain killers are okay, but a local anesthetic is better - try using some of the OTC stuff they have for toothaches(Lidocaine) that is usually in the mouthwash/toothpaste isle of the local pharmacy/ store. Try not to get it directly into the wound - just rub it in gently with a *gloved*(do NOT want numbed finger doing stitches!) finger keeping it out of the wound as best you can. Keep rubbing it in for a minute or two after the feeling around the wound stops to increase the numbness duration so you can make the stitches correctly(my first time I didn't do this and had to hurry - the wound is a little 'off' and the skin now 'pulls' a little funny when I need it to move).

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  • Drake88 commented on Man Up's instructable Fixing Frosted Chalked and Faded Headlights2 years ago
    Fixing Frosted Chalked and Faded Headlights

    Not if you plan on using it for polishing other items. Sometimes you get odd reactions when using an old polishing pad with a different chemical/ polisher. Also, some compounds(usually something that promises to remove minor scratches - like a lot of the 'snake-oil' TV promo stuff) have a small amount of chemical that can weaken the car paint - they do this to help 'blend' any scratches so they do not show up as bad.

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  • Drake88 commented on DannyMcMurray's instructable Marauder's Map FULL SIZE Replica2 years ago
    Marauder's Map FULL SIZE Replica

    Check out Youtube for some origami folding instructions/plans. Many of them have some very good methods for folding straight lines as well as curved ones.

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  • Drake88 commented on MaxPower1977's instructable How to Make a Propane Forge2 years ago
    How to Make a Propane Forge

    I have used a small portable water saw in the past and the design was very similar to the one in the picture. As far as could tell from looking at the one I used, it was exactly the same as an average 'skill'-type saw - except that the housing around the shaft was better sealed to prevent water from entering the motor.The one I used had the water line running over the top of the blade protection and the dripper was on the front side of the blade. The water line was also smaller, but that doesn't matter. It was a fairly old water saw belonging to my grandfather. I couldn't find a manufacturer name or emblem anywhere on it, but it worked perfectly for cutting some 1/2 inch tile we used for a bathroom and shower floor.As long as the water is kept away from the motor and any electrical item...

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    I have used a small portable water saw in the past and the design was very similar to the one in the picture. As far as could tell from looking at the one I used, it was exactly the same as an average 'skill'-type saw - except that the housing around the shaft was better sealed to prevent water from entering the motor.The one I used had the water line running over the top of the blade protection and the dripper was on the front side of the blade. The water line was also smaller, but that doesn't matter. It was a fairly old water saw belonging to my grandfather. I couldn't find a manufacturer name or emblem anywhere on it, but it worked perfectly for cutting some 1/2 inch tile we used for a bathroom and shower floor.As long as the water is kept away from the motor and any electrical items, it is safe.

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  • Drake88 commented on The Dutch cyclist's instructable Zip Tie Starlight 2 years ago
    Zip Tie Starlight

    It's another name for a small and very thin hand saw that is usually stiff-backed to prevent flexing of the saw. They are often used for cutting the slots for frets in stringed instruments fretboard/fingerboards. This is because they do NOT flex, can be very precise, and are easy to use. Some versions are often found in the larger hobby knife kits sold at hobby/modeling stores. My father used to be a luthier and has a number of them. Some of his are the more expensive professional Japanese kind.

    It's another name for a small and very thin hand saw that usually stiff-backed to prevent flexing of the saw. They are often used for cutting the slots for frets in musical stringed instruments, because they do NOT flex, can be very precise, ans are easy to use. Some versions are often found in the larger hobby knife kits sold at hobby/modeling stores.

    It's another name for a small and very thin hand saw that is usually stiff-backed to prevent flexing of the saw. They are often used for cutting the slots for frets in stringed instruments fretboard/fingerboards. This is because they do NOT flex and can be very precise. Most coping saws can flex some when used which isn't good for frets(bad musical notes).Some versions are often found in the larger hobby knife kits sold at hobby/modeling stores.

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