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2Instructables13,604Views9CommentsOntario
I like to make Stuff. Mostly involving batteries, usually with microcontrollers. I have a 3D printer I don't use often enough.

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  • GregorS3's instructable Simple Arduino Pro Micro Breakout's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Simple Arduino Pro Micro Breakout
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  • GregorS3 commented on GregorS3's instructable Automatic 18650 Analyzer2 years ago
    Automatic 18650 Analyzer

    <a href="https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/UKS3DZrt"><img src="https://oshpark.com/assets/badge-5b7ec47045b78aef6eb9d83b3bac6b1920de805e9a0c227658eac6e19a045b9c.png" alt="Order from OSH Park"></img></a>

    https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/UKS3DZrtNew board design to take a 128x32 I2C OLED

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  • GregorS3 commented on GregorS3's instructable Automatic 18650 Analyzer3 years ago
    Automatic 18650 Analyzer

    its hard to find thru holefets that work on 5V, you have to make sure your Rdson is low especially if you want to use only one voltage sense line per cell.

    My new version uses a separate 5V reference I can calibrate with a pot. The default 5V reference on the Arduino can range in value quite a bit depending on the power supply and the load your drawing from the pins for LED's and stuff. Decoupling caps just help reduce noise more. depending on the power supply you using noise from the supply can have a huge effect on the accuracy. If you don't measure the voltage on both sides of the load you have to take the voltage drop across the mosfet and your wiring. The drops should be low so might get good enough ignoring it and using 1 voltage sense.If you don't double check to reference voltage before every reading like i do in the code i have posted, you should be able to do 8 or 16 batteries at once. I find 60Hz polling is pretty good, I don't ...

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    My new version uses a separate 5V reference I can calibrate with a pot. The default 5V reference on the Arduino can range in value quite a bit depending on the power supply and the load your drawing from the pins for LED's and stuff. Decoupling caps just help reduce noise more. depending on the power supply you using noise from the supply can have a huge effect on the accuracy. If you don't measure the voltage on both sides of the load you have to take the voltage drop across the mosfet and your wiring. The drops should be low so might get good enough ignoring it and using 1 voltage sense.If you don't double check to reference voltage before every reading like i do in the code i have posted, you should be able to do 8 or 16 batteries at once. I find 60Hz polling is pretty good, I don't remember what it is in the code I posted.I have changed up the program a lot I need to do an update to thisInstructable soon.

    My new version uses a separate 5V reference I can calibrate with a pot. The default 5V reference on the Arduino can range in value quite a bit depending on the power supply and the load your drawing from the pins for LED's and stuff. Decoupling caps just help reduce noise more. depending on the power supply you using noise from the supply can have a huge effect on the accuracy. If you don't measure the voltage on both sides of the load you have to take the voltage drop across the mosfet and your wiring. The drops should be low so might get good enough ignoring it and using 1 voltage sense.If you don't double check to reference voltage before every reading like i do in the code i have posted, you should be able to do 8 or 16 batteries at once. I find 60Hz polling is pretty good, I don't ...

    see more »

    My new version uses a separate 5V reference I can calibrate with a pot. The default 5V reference on the Arduino can range in value quite a bit depending on the power supply and the load your drawing from the pins for LED's and stuff. Decoupling caps just help reduce noise more. depending on the power supply you using noise from the supply can have a huge effect on the accuracy. If you don't measure the voltage on both sides of the load you have to take the voltage drop across the mosfet and your wiring. The drops should be low so might get good enough ignoring it and using 1 voltage sense.If you don't double check to reference voltage before every reading like i do in the code i have posted, you should be able to do 8 or 16 batteries at once. I find 60Hz polling is pretty good, I don't remember what it is in the code I posted.I have changed up the program a lot I need to do an update to thisInstructable soon.

    View Instructable »