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  • HC15 commented on RayP24's instructable Gentle Giant Bookcase10 months ago
    Gentle Giant Bookcase

    Way cool design! I'm archiving this for possible future grandchild use--I'd like to try out of solid white pine, i.e. shelving board, using dado joints (I have a table saw). Stained gray of course!

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  • HC15 commented on Bverysharp's instructable Plane Blade Regrinding Jig10 months ago
    Plane Blade Regrinding Jig

    Nice job, and well documented too. I've considered something like this in the past, and will archive this for possible use later. About honing the blades, I've done that with my 6" powermatic joiner knives using my own homemade jig and some 400 then 600 grit silicon carbide sandpaper.My jig uses the same principle of the "Quik-Hone" or "Deulen" type sharpening jig, which holds two knives at opposing 45deg angles. You hone the two knives at the same time, dragging them across the sandpaper on a perfectly flat surface. This virtually guarantees a consistent angle. For a 3-knife cutterhead like mine, you label and rotate all three knives in and out of the jig as necessary in order to ensure equal amount of sharpening. But unlike the pricey Quik-Hone or Deulen jigs,...

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    Nice job, and well documented too. I've considered something like this in the past, and will archive this for possible use later. About honing the blades, I've done that with my 6" powermatic joiner knives using my own homemade jig and some 400 then 600 grit silicon carbide sandpaper.My jig uses the same principle of the "Quik-Hone" or "Deulen" type sharpening jig, which holds two knives at opposing 45deg angles. You hone the two knives at the same time, dragging them across the sandpaper on a perfectly flat surface. This virtually guarantees a consistent angle. For a 3-knife cutterhead like mine, you label and rotate all three knives in and out of the jig as necessary in order to ensure equal amount of sharpening. But unlike the pricey Quik-Hone or Deulen jigs, you can quickly make your own jig from a block of wood, even a 2 x 4 scrap if it's the proper density. Simply surface the bottom and two long edges to be perfectly flat/square, then run it across your table saw with the blade set at 45 to make two slots of sufficient depth to hold the knives securely. After the first slot cuts, you'll likely need to bump the saw fence slightly in or out and repeat the cuts to get the proper "interference fit" on the knives. That's the critical part--you don't want any play/slop for gripping the knives, yet you don't want it too tight a fit, such that the knives are very hard to remove. And you can remove them by prying up at one end using a scratch awl to get started, etc. Be careful, as they get SHARP!The best part is you can make such a jig in just a matter of a few minutes!

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  • HC15 commented on seamster's instructable Height-Adjustable Portable Vise Stand10 months ago
    Height-Adjustable Portable Vise Stand

    Dude. Sorry, but "harvesting" is a real euphemism for what happened to that old Craftsman radial arm saw. You're obviously a talented guy, and ended up with a nice tool, but considering the "waste" at the end...I just can't get behind this. I *do* get in front of my own Craftsman radial arm saw almost daily, and marvel at how dependably perfect my crosscuts are. Just sayin'

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