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  • IvliaB commented on ramenkingandi's instructable Ramen Bowl Lamp With Yellow LEDs5 weeks ago
    Ramen Bowl Lamp With Yellow LEDs

    Quick hint. If you first line your kinder egg with plastic before filling with the clay you can then just lift the clay out afterwards. Another solution I am told is to give a quick spray with a silicon spray, again the clay will just slip out of the mould afterwards. Great design and can easily be adapted for different finishes.

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  • IvliaB commented on misko13's instructable Saint Mark Cake (12th Century Recipe)4 months ago
    Saint Mark Cake (12th Century Recipe)

    What is cornstarch please, is it the same as corn flour? Also what type of liquor, or do you mean the highly flavoured liqueur which would make more sense and add some flavouring to a cake which, and I really like Genoese sponge and often make it, otherwise fsiurly tasteless. Certainly monasteries were making a form of liqueurs at this time for medicinal purposes using sundry herbs from the gardens. A lavender or rose flavoured liqueur would be lovely in this recipe (and lose the chocolate which would spoil it completely).

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  • The Swedish Killevipp Or: Dessert Goes Supernova

    Sounds lovely but, why oh why, ruin delicious meringue and cream with chocolate? Simple meringue ballks filled with cream, maybe flavoured with a drop of liqueur, and held together with the merest hint of the buttercream as a glue, again possibly flavoured with the same liqueur as before. But chocolate, (shudders) ruined.

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  • IvliaB commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy Soft Flour Tortillas7 months ago
    Easy Soft Flour Tortillas

    Many thanks. Had never realised tortillas are just pastry rounds rolled really thin and fried. Always thought they were more like naan bread or similar. Hot water pastry always tastes better than cold so can you roll, cut and cook before it cools down of do you have to wait for a specific reason? Just curious. Might try making my own though as they seem so easy to do.

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  • IvliaB commented on Simon_Cloutier's instructable Kitchen Island10 months ago
    Kitchen Island

    Very very nice but stuff in US must be expensive. For this price, allowing for currency exchange rates, I purchased 3 similar units for my kitchen. I do like this though and would seriously consider making something similar for my workroom. Cut outs on shelves make this individual, and home made is better when possible.

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  • Build Your Own Drivable Tiny House/camper

    Very nice. Did something similar years ago (comment in another instructible) and the most important part is choosing your car. We used an old Austin Maxi so didn't need to remove the seats plus there is storage underneath the back seat, great for water bottles and things. Carry on travelling cause a car makes things so much easier and cheaper.

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  • DIY Camper Van Kitchen With Sink and Propane Stove #VANLIFE

    Very nice and could be replicated for use in a tiny house or home-made bedsit using an induction hob. Also ideal if you like to visit events - dancing, horse eventing, athletic games etc. - when a hot drink or hot lunch would be welcome. Think I might try a modified version for just that purpose.

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  • IvliaB made the instructable VW Golf Tiny Roadtrip House10 months ago
    VW Golf Tiny Roadtrip House

    28 years ago with a 6mth old baby and a fog we went on a road trip. We purchased a small trailer to put things in (we were visiting showgrounds on the way so needed more storage for that part) and a fisherman's tent plus a port a potty (camping loo), camping stove - not gas, dog mat, Moses basket for baby, and raincoats cause it was Wales in autumn/fall. We drove an old Austin Maxi at the time and with the front seats pulled forward and the backs all the way back down plus the back of the back seat flat into the boot/trunk area we had a bed that was about 7' long and a good 6' wide, with a gap between the front seats for the gear/shift stick. Plenty of room for 2 adults using skeerping bags with a blanket over for added warmth and a dog on her own mattress, with space in the boot/trunk ...

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    28 years ago with a 6mth old baby and a fog we went on a road trip. We purchased a small trailer to put things in (we were visiting showgrounds on the way so needed more storage for that part) and a fisherman's tent plus a port a potty (camping loo), camping stove - not gas, dog mat, Moses basket for baby, and raincoats cause it was Wales in autumn/fall. We drove an old Austin Maxi at the time and with the front seats pulled forward and the backs all the way back down plus the back of the back seat flat into the boot/trunk area we had a bed that was about 7' long and a good 6' wide, with a gap between the front seats for the gear/shift stick. Plenty of room for 2 adults using skeerping bags with a blanket over for added warmth and a dog on her own mattress, with space in the boot/trunk for the Moses basket, nappies, bottles etc. The fisherman's tent held the ports potty, washing up bowl - on a camping stand -, camping stove when not in use plus wet raincoats and baby backpack. We cooked in the car, window down, if it rained or outside with the stove on the bonnet if dry, carried the baby in a backpack on my husband's back, used camping site showers and toilets but the ports loo at night, used UHT milk and disposable bottle liners for the baby plus disposable nappies/diapers, kept dog on lead at all times and always carried scented happy sacks for picking up after the dog as well as used nappies. The car didn't get that cold, and we had a great time travelling around Wales and the west of England. Our daughter was the ideal age, old enough to take camping in the cooler wet autumn/fall but small enough for the Moses basket in the boot/trunk and to be carried for hours in the backpack (we also had a front sling for if it got really wet or cold so she could fit under my husband's raincoat), much better than later trips with a tent. My advice, pick your vehicle and many older ones are more suitable, the seats in the Maxi fold down into a queen size sleeping area but can quickly be put up to make hot drinks first thing in the morning or last thing at night. We have a similar size car at present but couldn't camp in it as the seats don't fold back the same way to allow it. Hope you enjoyed your time, camping in a car can be better than in a tent, and would be great in summer (did it in a Suzuki Swift but not as good, again the seats don't fold down to like flat). Sorry no images from album but managed to find one showing the inside with all the seats down for sleeping. Was described at he time as the most versatile family car available in the UK.

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  • IvliaB followed artwithdEva10 months ago
      • DIY Indoor Water Fountain
      • DIY Crystals for Decoration
      • Turn Your Old Plates to Decorative Plates
  • IvliaB commented on rayo_viegas's instructable Lock Picking Tools From Scratch1 year ago
    Lock Picking Tools From Scratch

    Thank you for the schematics. I am needing to make a couple of sets of lockpicks (they don't need to actually work, just look the part) as late birthday presents, one set to be human sized and the other miniature sized suitable to be used by a cat (don't ask). They just need to look good and with this instructable I reckon I can make them to look realistic. Thanks again, I know we've got a couple of old wiper blades around so you've solved a major problem for me. Now for the rest of the 'tool kit' I have to make. Great instructable.

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  • Cost Effective Plastic-tub Wicking Beds

    A fabulous idea, and one I will seriously think about. One way to protect against the uv light would be to paint or otherwise cover the sides of the plastic tubs but checking costings you might find it cheaper to just replace the tubs when needed. If you are serious about growing more food items check out the book 'Square foot gardening', there is a website which will explain the principles. I got a copy from the library and photocopied the relevant pages. I have been able to keep a family of 4 adults supplied with minimal water usage although the wicking would help there. Well worth a look, can easily be modified to suit different needs but can grow deeper rooted items like carrots etc. as well in tubs and the like. Not a problem in Australia I know but a word of warning for those in o...

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    A fabulous idea, and one I will seriously think about. One way to protect against the uv light would be to paint or otherwise cover the sides of the plastic tubs but checking costings you might find it cheaper to just replace the tubs when needed. If you are serious about growing more food items check out the book 'Square foot gardening', there is a website which will explain the principles. I got a copy from the library and photocopied the relevant pages. I have been able to keep a family of 4 adults supplied with minimal water usage although the wicking would help there. Well worth a look, can easily be modified to suit different needs but can grow deeper rooted items like carrots etc. as well in tubs and the like. Not a problem in Australia I know but a word of warning for those in other climes, a wet summer (and we've had a run of those lately here in Ireland, family in NZ say the same there too, although they say it saves on the irrigation) and the vegetables will rot in the ground. The last few years I've lost everything, even with lots of holes to allow the water to escape. Will try your idea though and add a plexiglass roof over them, I'd rather irrigate than risk the flooding which I've suffered recently. Many thanks, I'd never though of using these boxes before but it makes perfect sense.

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  • IvliaB commented on lukeg22woo's instructable Design and Build a Tiny House1 year ago
    Design and Build a Tiny House

    Quite agree. As stated before I worked in insurance, albeit a few decades ago, and even then you could get insurance for a caravan (way before tiny homes per se) but it was best to get it through your local caravan club because they could get a good deal due to weight of numbers. But it was still only worth it if you used your caravan (as in travelled, stayed in, travelled back) at least once a month because of the cost. Like many others, we had a small caravan that my husband lived in mon-fri (he workedf 200 miles away from home, heck of a drive to do daily) but we did without the insurance, a small cheap caravan meant it wasn't worth the premiums. If you have expensive stuff inside though - electrical goods, solar panels, chargers, etc. - then it would definitely be worth it, especial...

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    Quite agree. As stated before I worked in insurance, albeit a few decades ago, and even then you could get insurance for a caravan (way before tiny homes per se) but it was best to get it through your local caravan club because they could get a good deal due to weight of numbers. But it was still only worth it if you used your caravan (as in travelled, stayed in, travelled back) at least once a month because of the cost. Like many others, we had a small caravan that my husband lived in mon-fri (he workedf 200 miles away from home, heck of a drive to do daily) but we did without the insurance, a small cheap caravan meant it wasn't worth the premiums. If you have expensive stuff inside though - electrical goods, solar panels, chargers, etc. - then it would definitely be worth it, especially today when if it's not bolted down they'll nick it (steal it) and sell it on. Simply, sit down and work out what you have in your tiny home, then search all the different insurance options - and don't discount belonging to a club of some sort if it gets better insurance for affordable premiums - and then look at the figures. If it's a steel/aluminium chassis and frame then if it burns you still have the basic frame, you can rebuild. If it's all wood and you have expensive items like cooking appliances, solar panels and add-ons, electrical appliances and anything else worth good money to replace, then I'd seriously consider insurance. Think of it as household insurance, you have house and contents, why should a tiny home be any different because what you lose in a big house house fire is just as precious as what you lose in a tiny house house fire.

    If it's warm or temperate all year try a bicycle powered washer (exercise plus quicker washing) and a line or rack outside for drying. There are also gas powered washer dryers available if you have lots of washing and really want to be off grid without driving into a laundromat each week

    Agree. If disabled like me there are tiny washer/spin dryers around - mainly from China - suitable for tiny homes/holiday homes/caravans/student flats which just wash and spin dry. You can add a simple line outside, or just buy a space saving clothes horse/dryer that can be put up and taken down, or put up inside if it does nothing but rain and you're running out of clothes. Plus, if you're really desperate there is almost certainly going to be a laundrette or something similar. We pack all out large items up every friday - work clothes (son-in-law in construction so they get really dirty), bedding, towels etc. and take them in to the local dry cleaner each week (she also has washers and dryers and a lot of customers) and pick them up the same evening. We have a small twin tub for undie...

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    Agree. If disabled like me there are tiny washer/spin dryers around - mainly from China - suitable for tiny homes/holiday homes/caravans/student flats which just wash and spin dry. You can add a simple line outside, or just buy a space saving clothes horse/dryer that can be put up and taken down, or put up inside if it does nothing but rain and you're running out of clothes. Plus, if you're really desperate there is almost certainly going to be a laundrette or something similar. We pack all out large items up every friday - work clothes (son-in-law in construction so they get really dirty), bedding, towels etc. and take them in to the local dry cleaner each week (she also has washers and dryers and a lot of customers) and pick them up the same evening. We have a small twin tub for undies and other small items plus a folding clothes rack we put outside (or inside in winter) to dry the clothes on. Also have hooks over the windows jutting out to hang hangers from (dresses etc.) for drying. Be inventive because this is an ages old problem, ask around on forums for ideas, I would suggest ask those in 'trailer parks' (is that the correct terminology) but in America everyone seems to have washer/dryers but there are many countries where, like us, people live in trailers (mobile homes here) and who don't have a washer dryer, or like us years ago who live in caravans during the week for work (you still have to wash things) where space is at a premium and a washer dryer won't fit.

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  • IvliaB commented on Carleyy's instructable Wall Mounted Sewing Station1 year ago
    Wall Mounted Sewing Station

    Make your pincushion then before sewing up the base insert a small magnet (from any good craft shop) and glue it to the fabric at the base, sew up and finish as normal. When you need to pull up pins just wave the base of the pin cushion over your work space and it will pick up all the pins then transfer to other side of cushion. Another way is the one used by my sewing mistress at secondary school, on a hook by the door she hung a simple horseshoe magnet and when we were finished our class before we left the room someone would take the magnet down and wave it over all the tables and the floor, voila, all pins suddenly accounted for. You could hang one on the end of the board or place it in a small bag as an alternative to the magnetic pin cushion. Either work just fine.

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  • IvliaB commented on lizzyastro's instructable Charm Pack Baby Quilt1 year ago
    Charm Pack Baby Quilt

    Nice design, and easily made. I have lots of bits of fabric left over from various projects (I make clothes) and this would be the perfect way to use them up. Cut into square or oblongs, depending on amounts available, and turn into a quilt. I have had a number of requests for them for the upcoming winter so think I will use this design. Many thanks as it looks fairly easy, though I will have to cut my own squares and stuff, can be done while watching a film so not a problem.

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  • IvliaB commented on Not_Tasha's instructable Easy Sewing Hacks1 year ago
    Easy Sewing Hacks

    Ironing wet fabric is great, but if you need to get creases out after you've started a project, or just need to press open seams etc., instead of wetting the fabric or having to fill the iron with water just grab a piece of left over fabric or a teatowel (my mums preferred method), run it under a tap/faucet and squeeze the excess water out then place over the item to be ironed. Hey presto, effect of steam ironing without the hassle, and you can leave it to one side and use it over and over as needed until finished, by which time you also have a dry tea towel again. Helps to protect delicate fabrics as well, plus I've never had to worry about the iron temperature being too high for the fabric I'm ironing, the tea towel acts as a protector in that regard as well. I still find it's better ...

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    Ironing wet fabric is great, but if you need to get creases out after you've started a project, or just need to press open seams etc., instead of wetting the fabric or having to fill the iron with water just grab a piece of left over fabric or a teatowel (my mums preferred method), run it under a tap/faucet and squeeze the excess water out then place over the item to be ironed. Hey presto, effect of steam ironing without the hassle, and you can leave it to one side and use it over and over as needed until finished, by which time you also have a dry tea towel again. Helps to protect delicate fabrics as well, plus I've never had to worry about the iron temperature being too high for the fabric I'm ironing, the tea towel acts as a protector in that regard as well. I still find it's better than a steam iron for many things, especially when applying iron-on interfacing or batting, either or both easily melt if the heat of the iron is too high even when set on steam.

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  • IvliaB commented on lukeg22woo's instructable Design and Build a Tiny House1 year ago
    Design and Build a Tiny House

    Even if you wash by hand I can't recommend highly enough that you get some sort of spin dryer. You can make a simple centrofuge yourself, think outsize salad spinner. But it will remove excess water which will make drying clothes so much quicker and easier, especially in winter. It will even make drying your towel and flannel after a shower quicker and easier, not to mention tea towels etc. You don't need electric (though it makes life easier and you can get great washer/spinner combinations designed for caravans) cause even a hand operated one (suitable geared obviously) makes life so much easier.

    This would probably depend where you live. In New Zealand for example you have to have your trailer every year just as you would a car, don't know what you call it in the US but it's MOT/NCT/warrent of fitness in UK/RoI/NZ. I believe the same might be needed in Europe, caravans certainly do so a trailer house probably would as well. Look in the Highway Code/Road Code booklet or on-line, that would tell you. What I do know is that if you're in an accident of any kind the insurance may not pay out if they deem the item being towed to be unsafe in any way, shape or form (and they can be nitpicking in this regard, used to work in insurance). I would recommend you check, ask, and check again. Also, do different states have different regulations, if so that could catch you out as well. Bette...

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    This would probably depend where you live. In New Zealand for example you have to have your trailer every year just as you would a car, don't know what you call it in the US but it's MOT/NCT/warrent of fitness in UK/RoI/NZ. I believe the same might be needed in Europe, caravans certainly do so a trailer house probably would as well. Look in the Highway Code/Road Code booklet or on-line, that would tell you. What I do know is that if you're in an accident of any kind the insurance may not pay out if they deem the item being towed to be unsafe in any way, shape or form (and they can be nitpicking in this regard, used to work in insurance). I would recommend you check, ask, and check again. Also, do different states have different regulations, if so that could catch you out as well. Better safe than sorry.

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  • IvliaB commented on jessyratfink's instructable homemade dry shampoo2 years ago
    homemade dry shampoo

    The vodka is added to ensure it won't go rancid. Can use plain alcohol, the stuff you buy to make your own liqueurs as well, unscented. If you like the scent use gin. The alcohol content is the important part if you want to make this to last. The more alcohol, within reason, the longer it will last.

    As an aside that is slightly unrelated. For those who have infestations of head lice - kids at school are main carriers - I have found that a mix of several different oils incl. Rosemary, Lavender, Thyme and Tea Tree mixed in with olive oil and applied - with a spray bottle - every couple of days gets rid of lice. Commercial products didn't work when local school had a bad outbreak so used this after asking an aromatherapist friend. Leaves hair greasy but just braided it, upside was no more headlice for the next 4 years til she left for secondary school. Was thinking I wish I'd known about the dry shampoo mixes back then, could have used it at night before brushing/combing next morning, adding more oils and rebraiding. Would have helped brush/comb out dead lice. Will be directing friend...

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    As an aside that is slightly unrelated. For those who have infestations of head lice - kids at school are main carriers - I have found that a mix of several different oils incl. Rosemary, Lavender, Thyme and Tea Tree mixed in with olive oil and applied - with a spray bottle - every couple of days gets rid of lice. Commercial products didn't work when local school had a bad outbreak so used this after asking an aromatherapist friend. Leaves hair greasy but just braided it, upside was no more headlice for the next 4 years til she left for secondary school. Was thinking I wish I'd known about the dry shampoo mixes back then, could have used it at night before brushing/combing next morning, adding more oils and rebraiding. Would have helped brush/comb out dead lice. Will be directing friends to this site for recipe to use for above purposes. Thanks, talc/baby powder just doesn't work the same when mixed with oils.

    Don't know if they are in the US but the british firm Boots Chemists sell own brand mineral face powder in round containers with a perforated inner lid and big brush. Can easily be reused when empty for other powders. Have several with remains of solid powder products that have broken in use like bronzer and stuff. Break it down and put in an old mineral container and label. Really useful. Other companies must make them as well.

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  • IvliaB commented on blkhawk's instructable House built with plastic and glass bottles2 years ago
    House built with plastic and glass bottles

    Except cement/concrete buildings built by the Romans over 2000 years ago are still standing, and in the case of one combined earthquake/flood the roman built concrete bridge was the ONLY building left standing. All the modern ones were ruins.

    Ask all your friends to save their empty plastic water and soda bottles. You'll be surprised how fast the pile grows and you're helping the recycling effort as well.

    See my comment above. Watch a series call Grand Designs available on YouTube and look for the episode that involves an entire house built from glass bottles and mud/concrete. The presenter is both an architect and an engineer and knows his stuff. If you are interested at all in this kind of building you need to watch this series, though as it's been on TV in the UK for 15 years you will have a number of episodes to sort through, but it's well worth it and very informative.

    Look on YouTube for a series called Grand Designs. In there you will f ind some houses built using bottles and another built using used car tires. They show you exactly how they are built and go from plot of ground to finished project being lived in. May answer some of your questions. Is certainly done in Europe as the above programme shows.

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  • IvliaB commented on GLOB_Youtube's instructable Cardboard Tube Bird Feeder 2 years ago
    Cardboard Tube Bird Feeder

    Sounds like a great idea but what to the birds cling on to while trying to feed. Plus, in my garden it would last about 2min before the food was gone and I had to replace it. A full plastic version of this with mixed seed on the inside gets emptied daily, and that only caters for a few varieties of birds. I won't mention all the others we feed.Yes, we live in the countryside but feeding the birds is great for the parents feeding chicks and for the chicks themselves when they first leave the nest. It also provides hours of entertainment for our house cat.

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