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  • JayneC23 commented on Crafts with Ellen's instructable Make a Mousepad1 year ago
    Make a Mousepad

    Thanks for the Instructable, though it'd be helpful to include a bit more info about the kind of glue you'd used. In the vast world of adhesives there're many different types... and for the most part, all glues fall into one of several different categories/types of adhesives, depending on their formulation or the main ingredient(s) they're made of... as well as other key characteristics.And "All-Purpose" is a fairly vague, generic description... a denomination given to products by manufacturers mostly for marketing reasons. But it doesn't say much about the kind of glue/adhesive it is or what it's main make-up is. So one manufacturer/brand's "All-Purpose" glue product can be quite different in formulation, consistency, performance, etc. than what another manufacturer...

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    Thanks for the Instructable, though it'd be helpful to include a bit more info about the kind of glue you'd used. In the vast world of adhesives there're many different types... and for the most part, all glues fall into one of several different categories/types of adhesives, depending on their formulation or the main ingredient(s) they're made of... as well as other key characteristics.And "All-Purpose" is a fairly vague, generic description... a denomination given to products by manufacturers mostly for marketing reasons. But it doesn't say much about the kind of glue/adhesive it is or what it's main make-up is. So one manufacturer/brand's "All-Purpose" glue product can be quite different in formulation, consistency, performance, etc. than what another manufacturer/brand might tout as their "All-Purpose" adhesive, even though both are made and marketed for general household use. Considering you'd included the sample tests you'd done with different glues to point out the varying differences of each after they'd dried and cured, and how the aesthetic or tactile qualities of the fabric can be affected as a result and would, therefore, also affect the end result of the finished project... and when pertaining to adhesives that might not be commonly recognized or readily available in other countries, or when labelled in a different language, it'd be especially helpful to include a little more info about the type of glue you'd used since it seemed to work out well for you (and because this is an Instructable, after all). :)It'd help so others wouldn't necessarily have to go through the same process of trial and error as you had... or so those who don't already have a variety of glues to try out would have a better idea of what to look for or buy (and hopefully not end up with a hard or wrinkly mouse pad, or whatever could be the case!)

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  • Fixing a Plastic (polyethylene) Kayak With a Hole in It

    Rather than smooth the edges with a spoon which tends to stick, I'd try to find a suitable tool made of silicone since it's non-stick and also fairly heat-resistant (usually up to about 550ºF - 600ºF). These days there are tons of silicone utensils found in cookware/kitchenware stores. Ideally I think something along the lines of a small stainless steel spatula that's encased in silicone at the flat end. They make some pretty small ones these days as specialty items for baking cookies and such... something like that should be relatively inexpensive for the relative ease and practicality it'd provide I think. Worth trying anyways! Silicone oven gloves might be a consideration as well for someone who does this kind of thing quite regularly!

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  • JayneC23 commented on mikey77's instructable How to Make Your Own Sugru Substitute1 year ago
    How to Make Your Own Sugru Substitute

    I vacuum seal most of my adhesives as well... get tired of spending good money on so many specialty glues, only to find them rock hard when I go to use them again, and recently I found a zipper bag containing a few adhesives had failed. Mind you, I didn't think to tape the flap as suggested by the OP, so electrical tape could be good for that. Though I'm thinking to stick to regular bags/rolls just to play it safe as I don't check on the adhesives on a regular basis so would hate to lose some of them by having another bag fail, even with taping the flap. There's the zipper part itself, which I go over a few times to make sure it's well sealed, but who knows if it could still fail at some point... ohhh, actually I'm just looking back at your comment now and realizing I'd misinterpreted i...

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    I vacuum seal most of my adhesives as well... get tired of spending good money on so many specialty glues, only to find them rock hard when I go to use them again, and recently I found a zipper bag containing a few adhesives had failed. Mind you, I didn't think to tape the flap as suggested by the OP, so electrical tape could be good for that. Though I'm thinking to stick to regular bags/rolls just to play it safe as I don't check on the adhesives on a regular basis so would hate to lose some of them by having another bag fail, even with taping the flap. There's the zipper part itself, which I go over a few times to make sure it's well sealed, but who knows if it could still fail at some point... ohhh, actually I'm just looking back at your comment now and realizing I'd misinterpreted it. I thought you were referring to using the Foodsaver zipper bags, which the OP was referring to.. but seeing now your comment about "rolling the bags up" to get the air out I guess you were talking about using regular ziplock bags?? If so, I could see those failing for sure... they're not strong and made for durability...the zips themselves are quite flexible and thin usually....

    I have a few pairs of boots that need the heels repaired (apparently I walk in a way that harshly wears down the outside-back corner), so I'd gotten some of those heel soles to repair one pair, but I also have another pair that is only starting to wear down but it's a thin sole to begin with that can't take much more wear before it's gonna be the sidewalk chewing up my socks (exaggerating, but probably not by too much... lol)... anyways, because of the type of sole those boots are made with, and that the wear isn't significant enough to warrant adding on a big chunky heel, I wanted to patch it up a bit, at least even just to protect it in the meantime from chewing through the fabric layer as it's already just starting to show. I was thinking to try Plastidip (not the spray, but the one ...

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    I have a few pairs of boots that need the heels repaired (apparently I walk in a way that harshly wears down the outside-back corner), so I'd gotten some of those heel soles to repair one pair, but I also have another pair that is only starting to wear down but it's a thin sole to begin with that can't take much more wear before it's gonna be the sidewalk chewing up my socks (exaggerating, but probably not by too much... lol)... anyways, because of the type of sole those boots are made with, and that the wear isn't significant enough to warrant adding on a big chunky heel, I wanted to patch it up a bit, at least even just to protect it in the meantime from chewing through the fabric layer as it's already just starting to show. I was thinking to try Plastidip (not the spray, but the one used for dipping tools into). Was thinking to kinda paint it on as a patch. I know Plastidip can be removed from surfaces like metal, but am I understanding correctly that the consistency of it is more like rubber than plastic? I'm assuming it should adhere well to rubber, even if it's not super durable, it should provide some protection at least and can be layered up as needed I'd think. But this is all theoretical postulating as I've never actually had a can of it to play around with before, so I have no personal experience to be familiar with its characteristics. Have you ever tried Plastidip on rubber soles? Or are you familiar with it... like, enough to know if it'd be likely to fail or succeed?

    Why bother with expensive gallon bags? The rolls are the way to go... make your own size... I hardly ever buy bags (except now that I've tried and am liking the zipper bags)... otherwise I pretty much always buy the rolls, and preferably the 8" rolls as the 11" rolls can be a royal pain in the arse at times to get a good seal, no matter how much I try and pull the edges taut when sealing to get it nice and flat.

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