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NateHoy

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  • Good thinking!The metal body of the heater itself should be grounded, and the paint should not be an efficient enough insulator to prevent the static electricity from grounding straight from the new shield to the heater. However, it's almost always a good idea to add MORE grounding to any metal that is going to be near electronics just in case. ;)

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  • It is a federal crime to fraudulently deface a coin (or bill, for that matter, but that is under a different statute). The key word that is often missed is "fraudulently".A ring cannot be mistaken for currency. There is no fraud.

    I'm curious - what portions of the code are you using to base your interpretation? I can't find a "destruction of federal property" statute that covers things like currency. Only things that are clearly government property, like vehicles and signage.Other than the penny and the nickel, it costs less to make a coin than its face value, so making a quarter and putting it into circulation actually MAKES money for the US Mint (to the total tune of almost $300 million a year). http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2014/12/15/just-how...

    It is only illegal to fraudulently deface a coin (or bill, for that matter, but that is under a different statute). The key word that is often missed when citing these statutes is fraudulently.http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/uscode/18/I/17/331There's nothing at all fraudulent about making a quarter into something that cannot be mistaken for valid US currency. Otherwise those people who make the "penny smashers" that turn a penny into a tourist trinket would be in serious trouble.It's your money. Turn it into a ring, hit it with a sledgehammer, burn it, smelt it and turn it into a Buddha statue, anything goes as long as you don't try to pass it off as currency afterward.

    Yup. If you're going to get rude when I ask for sources, discussion over.

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