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  • OliverS104 commented on Davide67's instructable How to Build a Ping Pong Table9 months ago
    How to Build a Ping Pong Table

    A ping pong table is 5x9 (feet) and it is nearly impossible to make one from the 4x8 sheets at most nationwide large home improvement centers in the USA or from the similarly sized panels available in the EU. It takes 3 sheets to get the required pieces (2 @ 5 x 4, 1 @ 5x1 or 2 @ 5x 1/2 if you’re making half table panels for easier storage or a folding frame. Some experience and skill is required to splice the center area. If it were a first project requiring this use some of the scrap to make 2 or 3 practice pairs 5’ long, (close enough doesn’t look good on a ping pong table - keep practicing) If you do splice, 2 seams 6” from the net each will be less disruptive. I suggest finding the right size panelsa 16mm thick panel is less desirable than an 18mm panel because the internal layup ...

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    A ping pong table is 5x9 (feet) and it is nearly impossible to make one from the 4x8 sheets at most nationwide large home improvement centers in the USA or from the similarly sized panels available in the EU. It takes 3 sheets to get the required pieces (2 @ 5 x 4, 1 @ 5x1 or 2 @ 5x 1/2 if you’re making half table panels for easier storage or a folding frame. Some experience and skill is required to splice the center area. If it were a first project requiring this use some of the scrap to make 2 or 3 practice pairs 5’ long, (close enough doesn’t look good on a ping pong table - keep practicing) If you do splice, 2 seams 6” from the net each will be less disruptive. I suggest finding the right size panelsa 16mm thick panel is less desirable than an 18mm panel because the internal layup is more susceptible to curling. Whatever panels you use, they have to be sealed on all sides to avoid curling 5x5 (feet) is a specialty furniture and cabinet makers plywood size, usually a high quality panel, and priced accordingly. 5x10 (feet) is available in every grade from CDX to luan veneer faces. Choosing a good grade will save many hours of filling and sanding. I’m less certain about the availability of the size in the EU than North America - perhaps someone else will comment.Finding either of these sizes in stock locally depends on whether or not someone in business near there buys them regularly, Most lumber yards will order them, if they won’t, call another lumber yard until you find one that will.

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  • OliverS104 commented on fred27's instructable Control ANY Light With Philips Hue10 months ago
    Control ANY Light With Philips Hue

    It is correct that the 1khz PWM output is not immediately suitable for use as a PWM for 50Hz or 60Hz AC power. There’s a 0-10v DC control standard for dimmers and they’re widely available. You’re probably better off buying a dimmer and integrating the PWM output to a DC signal. (No op-amp required, every series R-C circuit integrates the voltage across the pair to the voltage across C. Tap that with a resistive voltage divider to produce a 0-10v signal for a dimmer. )As a general overview, AC dimming is done at the power line frequency. Each positive or negative half cycle begins “off” and a thryistor (not an FET) may be triggered “on” at some point during the half cycle. A thryistor latches itself on and won’t turn off until the end of the half cycle. I’ll skip over most of the implem...

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    It is correct that the 1khz PWM output is not immediately suitable for use as a PWM for 50Hz or 60Hz AC power. There’s a 0-10v DC control standard for dimmers and they’re widely available. You’re probably better off buying a dimmer and integrating the PWM output to a DC signal. (No op-amp required, every series R-C circuit integrates the voltage across the pair to the voltage across C. Tap that with a resistive voltage divider to produce a 0-10v signal for a dimmer. )As a general overview, AC dimming is done at the power line frequency. Each positive or negative half cycle begins “off” and a thryistor (not an FET) may be triggered “on” at some point during the half cycle. A thryistor latches itself on and won’t turn off until the end of the half cycle. I’ll skip over most of the implementation details, thyristors need a trigger pulse with enough current to switch all the way “on” rapidly, a weak trigger still works, but the early turn on as the current multiplies leaves a lot of voltage across the thryistor and the V x I product is the power dissipation, a fast turn-on doesn’t leave as much energy heating the thryistor, which is good because turn on happens at twice the line frequency. Some very simple designs use a neon lamp, others use a diac. Both are avalanche breakdown devices. They’re off until they reach a breakdown voltage, then a stored charge can be rapidly flushed through the device, briefly simulating a negative impedance. It continues to conduct at a much lower terminal voltage until its shut off. A neon lamp is cheap and long lived, but the voltage tolerance is wide and increases with age, the breakdown and on-state voltage is temperature dependent, and also varies with the ambient light level. The sophistication of the trigger circuit is usually somewhat limited because power circuits have a lot of voltage transients and a reliable circuit uses devices rated at twice the power line peak voltage (1.414 tines the RMS value). A sophisticated pulse driver can be protected from capacitively coupled transients at the thryistor gate, but it adds complexity. It’s difficult to make ac thryistors dimmers reduce the power to a very low power fraction because there’s a minimum voltage and current for the trigger to stay latched on. Very low power fractions can be reached by cycle-skipping, that is only triggering every Nth cycle, but some lamps may show flickering. Its also important to avoid any significant DC current by maintaining (nearly) equal average positive and negative current.

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  • DIY Platform Bed With Floating Night Stands

    Re:perfect: oh, by no means, nothing I've ever done has been perfect. Most of it has been satisfying anyway, i.e. It was good enough. As I've looked closer at your photos I continue to be impressed with your workmanship and skill not to mention your tidiness (my workshop is always ankle deep in chips and sawdust). You also appear to have the knack for glueing well without gallons of squeezeout to clean up, I've never managed that either.I hadn't realized your bed project is temporary furniture. Your structural choices make good sense. If it isn't long-term permanent there's no need for the slats to last decades or for the frame to knock down when it time to paint. Most importantly, I apologize for making you feel criticized or picked on. It's a great looking bed. Well done.

    and to the positive side;1) really excellent fit and trim, and without a jointer or a planer in sight.2) I really appreciate how hard you must have worked to get such a nice surface on the end grain of those pieces.3) I'm actually very impressed to managed to dowel the night stands to the headboard. It's quite a feat to execute it withiut any tooling or fixtures without tossing at least a few pieces that wouldn't line up.4) I've already said I like the overall design style, it it's worth repeating.5) the indirect color lighting is just the right amount of accent in just the right places. 6) the under-stand puck lights are as practical as they are attractive. I expect they look better in a dim room than your photos here captured.

    no, it's a great design, like I said i've sleeping on one for 30 years. this particular implementation made some things more difficult to do and to use than they need to be and as long as people are considering making one they might as well have some helpful hints. Nothing difficult to amend. It seems to have been executed by a framing carpenter who has limited experience doing furniture. (The 2x10/2x12 framing timbers aren't needed for strength 1xn would have been plenty, it's familiar material, perrhaps some of it is left over material from paying jobs. Mending plates etc is also framing carpentry. A furniture person would have used 1xn strip edges on a veneered plywood, etc., and all that would be a very different implementation for more experience craftsmen.)

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  • DIY Platform Bed With Floating Night Stands

    From having slept on a bed that was made substantially this way for the last 30 years I have a few comments on the design.1) doweling the night stands is an un-necessary heroic feat. There's a hardware product called a flush mount clip. Both halves are basically a steel plate that has the center 1/3 raised and half of it freed to form a flat finger. The two halves interlock. Rocker doesn't sell any, and the z-clips they do sell can slide sideways so they aren't an alternative. Make the nightstand with the mounting face slightly recessed or pocketed. It also works as a mount if you make a recessed inset back nightstand as sides of a box that receive a single drawer. (You only need 4 sides and can let the headboard be the 5th side if you heroically dowel it.) the clips look like these htt...

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    From having slept on a bed that was made substantially this way for the last 30 years I have a few comments on the design.1) doweling the night stands is an un-necessary heroic feat. There's a hardware product called a flush mount clip. Both halves are basically a steel plate that has the center 1/3 raised and half of it freed to form a flat finger. The two halves interlock. Rocker doesn't sell any, and the z-clips they do sell can slide sideways so they aren't an alternative. Make the nightstand with the mounting face slightly recessed or pocketed. It also works as a mount if you make a recessed inset back nightstand as sides of a box that receive a single drawer. (You only need 4 sides and can let the headboard be the 5th side if you heroically dowel it.) the clips look like these http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=40349...2) There aren't enough mattress/foundation supporting slats, and they aren't tough enough. I know they seem great and everything is working fine and I know with some precision just how long they will last. At the spacing shown pine will last less than a year before one bows far enough down to pop out of the end and drop, and when you go to look you'll find others cracked and broken in place. Even a straight grained oak or maple will last less than 5 years. (Plywood has the grain in a useless direction for half of its layers and is weak for this purpose). If you decrease the spacing to reach 50% coverage you can use any straight grained species except for the pines and firs. A sealer, even sanding sealer, is strongly suggested for those who don't live in the desert southwest or Southern California.3) The base outline box is much easier to handle when it's time to move the bed if you join them with bed rail brackets like these ones. http://www.rockler.com/5-surface-mounted-bed-rail-... The bed has to be moved far more often than its owner changes addresses. It has to come out of the room if the wall-to-wall carpet is changed or the floor is refinished and it's too much to work around when it's time to paint the room.4) the center rail will cause less trouble if it isn't a heavy timber and it touches down on a few short posts with screw levelers. A house shifts both seasonally and over years. As much as I like solid construction, if the bed's outline box is too stiff it will teeter-totter when the house shifts the wrong way. Don't try to explain why that's OK to your spouse, it can't be done. Not even if it only does it when no one is in it. Also, attach the center rail with center rail clips as found on rockler. http://www.rockler.com/center-bed-rail-fasteners5) the platform surround will become unloved in unprintable detail. Returning to bed in the middle of the night with the lights out, your shin, the long straight unpadded bone in the front of your lower leg, will be the part of you that finds the bed first. These days you can put a motion sensor and some led strip lights on a PWM dimmer to come on to automatically warn you of impending disaster. Even so, you will walk into the edge in full daylight once a year or more. Almost any kind of padding will help from now until you give up and rework the edge. Oh, and until then, ice the impact zone immediately, or the lump will be as impressive as it is painful, and last 5 days instead of 1 or 2.6) there is no upright vacuum with a beater bar that will slip under the edge to clean the carpet. There is no canister vacuum with a good beater bar that would get that part of the carpet really clean for a price you want to pay. A roomba would work, but it doesn't really a good job on carpet. Sorry, there is no solution for this one. (Don't say "car nozzle" unless you're really willing to do that on your hands and knees forever more.)7) purple black light also works where you have the rgb LEDs. LED black light doesn't produce a good glow effect at a price anyone would pay because 365 and 375nm LEDs are still very expensive and 385 or 395nm doesn't make stuff glow. 2 of the 12 watt fluorescent tube lights will work well and while there are still 40W T12 tubes that's really too bright.

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