author
352Instructables15,715,782Views5,151CommentsKnoxville, TennesseeJoined July 17th, 2008
I miss the days when magazines like Popular Mechanics had all sorts of DIY projects for making and repairing just about everything. I am enjoying posting things I have learned and done since I got my first tools. I enjoy studying the Bible and retired after 40 years as a Lutheran pastor. I like to dabble with some electronics projects. I have a wood lathe and a metal lathe, a radial arm saw, a router, and both a 220 volt stick welder and a gas shielded wire feed welder. I appreciate In... Read More »

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Make It Move Contest 2017
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Make It Move Contest 2017
Fix & Repair Contest
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Fix & Repair Contest
MacGyver Challenge
Contest Winner Runner Up in the MacGyver Challenge
Metal Contest 2016
Contest Winner First Prize in the Metal Contest 2016
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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer15 hours ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    I would not make or use it if I thought it not safe. Go to YouTube and there are a couple of videos using a saw blade on a trimmer very safely, even if they are more aggressive with them than I would ever care to be. Do you say my brush blade is not safe because of an actual incident of which you have firsthand knowledge, or is your judgment based on theorizing?

    Your unfortunate circular saw experience is not an analogous situation. Go to YouTube and search for “weed trimmer bush blade.” One videio is by a guy in the USA who needed to remove brush from a fence line. The other is a forest worker in Sweden. Both are using Husqvarna trimmers and both are using carbide tip blades with larger diameters than I use. (Part of my rationale is that a smaller diameter blade has less potentially dangerous torque by virtue of its shorter radius.) In both videos the operators are cutting branches up to 3 inches in diameter. They buzz through them like a hot knife in soft butter with no kickback and only fine dust from the blade. Engineering is a wonderful discipline. I once wanted to become one. I am reminded of an older gentleman I once knew. He did many ve...

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    Your unfortunate circular saw experience is not an analogous situation. Go to YouTube and search for “weed trimmer bush blade.” One videio is by a guy in the USA who needed to remove brush from a fence line. The other is a forest worker in Sweden. Both are using Husqvarna trimmers and both are using carbide tip blades with larger diameters than I use. (Part of my rationale is that a smaller diameter blade has less potentially dangerous torque by virtue of its shorter radius.) In both videos the operators are cutting branches up to 3 inches in diameter. They buzz through them like a hot knife in soft butter with no kickback and only fine dust from the blade. Engineering is a wonderful discipline. I once wanted to become one. I am reminded of an older gentleman I once knew. He did many very technical things without even a high school education. Once a group of engineers at the company where he worked had developed an idea. He happened to look over their shoulders and told them their idea wouod not work. That did not please them, but he was right.

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  • Thank you for the suggestion about the copper tubing. If the saw were mine and no longer under warranty I would cut screw slots in the top of the screws. Since posting this, we have purchased a new Troy-Bilt string trimmer with another style of screw designed to foil the owner/mechanic. Its screws have a flat side. I have been sble to make a tool, but I had to use a metal lathe and a welder. For most of my life those things were not svailable to me and are not now available to most people.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Great Projects From Old How-to Magazines3 days ago
    Great Projects From Old How-to Magazines

    Thank you for looking and commenting. For a time I had an older set of encylopedia volumes from Popular Mechanics from about 1955, but passed them on later when I realized they were no longer an asset to me personally. It was through that set I first learned about the arc welder from the core of a step down transformer. (There are several Instructables on rebuilding and pairing a couple of microwave transformers to make an AC stick welder.)I remember Mechanix Illustrated as well as Science and Mechanics. I did look for similar archinves on them, but found very little. I did find an early 1960s article on building a 3/4 size 1901 Oldsmobile with a one cylinder 4-cycle gasoline engine. It appeared in Mechanix Illustrated, but what I found nowhere mentions Mechanix Illustrates, even though...

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    Thank you for looking and commenting. For a time I had an older set of encylopedia volumes from Popular Mechanics from about 1955, but passed them on later when I realized they were no longer an asset to me personally. It was through that set I first learned about the arc welder from the core of a step down transformer. (There are several Instructables on rebuilding and pairing a couple of microwave transformers to make an AC stick welder.)I remember Mechanix Illustrated as well as Science and Mechanics. I did look for similar archinves on them, but found very little. I did find an early 1960s article on building a 3/4 size 1901 Oldsmobile with a one cylinder 4-cycle gasoline engine. It appeared in Mechanix Illustrated, but what I found nowhere mentions Mechanix Illustrates, even though it is clearly the MI article. I would encourage you to check later for archives of Mechanix Illustrated and Science and Mechanis. Things change and they may become available one day. Unfortunately, I do not remember the project you want to find.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer15 days ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    I am glad to have been of help. I found a video today showing a guy in Sweden who put a circular carbide blade on a Husqvarna trimmer and demonstrated cutting down a tree with a diameter almost 12” using only the trimmer. He cut a wedge out of one side. He could have used the space created by removing the wedge to cut even farther into the tree trunk, but succeeded in felling it by cutting at the sides and back of the tree. He admistted he would normally have used a chainsaw. He did have a few provlems with kickback. I simoly want to cut an occasional woody stalk my trimmer string will not handle. I do not yet understand all I wish to understand, but many of these oeople are buy blades at eBay. They seem to be a kit in which thee also are washers to center the blade on the hsaft below t...

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    I am glad to have been of help. I found a video today showing a guy in Sweden who put a circular carbide blade on a Husqvarna trimmer and demonstrated cutting down a tree with a diameter almost 12” using only the trimmer. He cut a wedge out of one side. He could have used the space created by removing the wedge to cut even farther into the tree trunk, but succeeded in felling it by cutting at the sides and back of the tree. He admistted he would normally have used a chainsaw. He did have a few provlems with kickback. I simoly want to cut an occasional woody stalk my trimmer string will not handle. I do not yet understand all I wish to understand, but many of these oeople are buy blades at eBay. They seem to be a kit in which thee also are washers to center the blade on the hsaft below the bump head for the string.

    At YouTube search for CIRCULAR Saw blade on TRIMMER???TEST+ and How to turn your weed eater into a tree eater! A search for “weed trimmer brush blade” turns up some additional videos I have not yet viewed.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer16 days ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    I looked and found two videos at YouTube in which guys attached a circular blade to a weed trimmer. Both used larger diameter blades than mine. The users were also cutting sbove their heads. I do not like using a blade power tool above my head. A circular electric saw used in carpentry can kick back, but a weed trimmer does not seem to catch and kick. I would think the centrifugal clutcih might also slip. I would always want to pay attention to the cut I am making, lest the weight of a branch would pinch against the blade. It is better if the pieces separate from one another as the cut progresses. In the YouTube videos limbs separated and fell as if butter cut by a hot knife. A large concern for me when attempting this was to have a solid mount for the blade that remains centered withit...

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    I looked and found two videos at YouTube in which guys attached a circular blade to a weed trimmer. Both used larger diameter blades than mine. The users were also cutting sbove their heads. I do not like using a blade power tool above my head. A circular electric saw used in carpentry can kick back, but a weed trimmer does not seem to catch and kick. I would think the centrifugal clutcih might also slip. I would always want to pay attention to the cut I am making, lest the weight of a branch would pinch against the blade. It is better if the pieces separate from one another as the cut progresses. In the YouTube videos limbs separated and fell as if butter cut by a hot knife. A large concern for me when attempting this was to have a solid mount for the blade that remains centered withit wobble.

    I use a finer tooth blade because I believe it cuts less per tooth than a coarser blade and is less likely to bind or kick back. From experience cutting steel with a disc on an angle head grinder, the position on the blade where it contacts the material to be cut has a big effect of any tendency to push back. I have cut things with a very small stalk with this and found no sensation of pushback at all. As I said, I do not force the blade, but let it cut at its own speed. Since posting this I stumbled onto a video at YouTube showing a man fitting a slightly larger blade to a weed trimmer and using it to cut limbs 3 or more inches in diameter from trees. There was no sign of binding or pushing back. I do not know that I would care to cut larger things like that. I think such larger things...

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    I use a finer tooth blade because I believe it cuts less per tooth than a coarser blade and is less likely to bind or kick back. From experience cutting steel with a disc on an angle head grinder, the position on the blade where it contacts the material to be cut has a big effect of any tendency to push back. I have cut things with a very small stalk with this and found no sensation of pushback at all. As I said, I do not force the blade, but let it cut at its own speed. Since posting this I stumbled onto a video at YouTube showing a man fitting a slightly larger blade to a weed trimmer and using it to cut limbs 3 or more inches in diameter from trees. There was no sign of binding or pushing back. I do not know that I would care to cut larger things like that. I think such larger things might overload the driveshaft. Remember, too, that the factory string cutter guard is still in place, although that is not prominent in the photos. I think if you tried what I have done you would find your fears about binding and kickback are unfounded.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Sharpen Your Drill Bits20 days ago
    Sharpen Your Drill Bits

    Thank you for the offer. I think that is the same sharoening guide I have. I think I have the instructions, yet. I have also finally been able to sharpen most of the bits I use by hand acceptably well.

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  • Phil B's instructable Custom Quick Link's weekly stats: 21 days ago
    • Custom Quick Link
      575 views
      2 favorites
      3 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Sharpen Your Drill Bits21 days ago
    Sharpen Your Drill Bits

    My father did electrical work when I was in grade school. I was often his helper, and we used those. After I was married almost 50 years ago, I bought one of those. That was before I felt I could afford an electric drill. I would suggest you sharpen them by hand, but very lightly. Point the front end of the bit at the wheel. Swing the back end of the bit to the left between 5 and 10 degrees and lower the bsck end of the bit about the same. Grind away no more than absilutely necessary. Rotate the bit 180 degrees and repeat. Try to keep the peak of the bit centered on the flutes as much as possible. Thank you for your question and for the memory.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer23 days ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    The regular factory shield has not been moved or removed, although it is not prominent in any of the photos. And, Troy-Bilt makes a brush cutter attachment with a steel blade that fits my trimmer. The operator’s feet are the same 36+ inches from the cutter, whether the 0.095” trimmer string, or the circular blade I used, or the commercial brush blade from Troy-Bilt. Your apprehensions may well keep you from using any weed trimmer on the market.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Refurbish an Old Slide Rule26 days ago
    Refurbish an Old Slide Rule

    Thank you for your comment. Purists want a slide rule to be restored with original parts, or they lsbel it a “Frankenrule.” I am not a purist, but wanted a nice used rule with potential to be useful. I like the idea of printing your own oarts to cure KERCS. Very clever!

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  • Aviao Experimental Feito Em Casa (home-made Experimental Plane)

    For an interesting story and photos about an airplane built from common materials, search the Internet for DOWA 81. It is a plane a man in East Germany buiot to fly have s family to freedom in the West, but the police came the day before they were to fly.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Display Case for a Military Honors Flag26 days ago
    Display Case for a Military Honors Flag

    Thank you. I have thiught many times how I would do it better next time, and have watched some videos on how others did it. But, I have never needed another. Most avoid 22.5 degree cuts because too many things can go wrong.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Custom Quick Link27 days ago
    Custom Quick Link

    Thank you for looking and for commenting. I thought about just buying a carabiner, but the challenge of making something was strong, I think they come on a card of three, and, I would have needed to take time to drive to a store and look for one.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Corroded Maglite 4 weeks ago
    Corroded Maglite

    Thank you. Since posting this, I have also seen a suggestion that alkaline battery corrosion should be neutralized with an acid, like vinegar.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack4 weeks ago
    Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack

    Thank you for the report. I am glad this was helpful.

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  • Phil B's instructable Corroded Maglite 's weekly stats: 4 weeks ago
    • Corroded Maglite
      1,317 views
      7 favorites
      2 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer4 weeks ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    Thank you for commenting. I understand what you say. Still, Troy-Bilt offers a brush blade for my trimmer. The blade I am using has fine teeth and does not present a shock to the driveshaft like the factory blade that has four cutting protrusions which are rather blunt. I mentioned I avoid revving the blade like the driver of a muscle car at a stoplight. I also do not force the blade, but let it cut at its own pace. And, I will not use thIs blade often. Almost 30 years ago I had a very inexpensive Ryan weed trimmer with a curved shaft. A friend had a brush filled back yard. I fitted a similar blade to the trimmer head and cut a lot of small trees that day. I was careful not to stress the shaft any more than necessary. That driveshaft lived to see many more days.

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  • Phil B commented on luann2425's instructable Dealing With Instructables Rejection4 weeks ago
    Dealing With Instructables Rejection

    There was a time when I siad I would never enter another contest. It seemed high quality entries (from others) went unnoticed, while prizes went to unremarkable efforts. Finally, I did submit an entry in a contest because the theme of the contest intrigued me and I had a fresh Instructsble that qualified. It won a decent practical prize, although not the top prize--a good battery powered drill. Later, I entered another contest and one one of the top three prizes--a MIG welder. I almost did not write and post that Instructsble because a series of similar Instructables I really think were better got almost no notice. Ten days ago I submitted an Instructsble that would save people who can use it some money. It was not featured, but it fits a contest and I entered it. Suddenly somebody is l...

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    There was a time when I siad I would never enter another contest. It seemed high quality entries (from others) went unnoticed, while prizes went to unremarkable efforts. Finally, I did submit an entry in a contest because the theme of the contest intrigued me and I had a fresh Instructsble that qualified. It won a decent practical prize, although not the top prize--a good battery powered drill. Later, I entered another contest and one one of the top three prizes--a MIG welder. I almost did not write and post that Instructsble because a series of similar Instructables I really think were better got almost no notice. Ten days ago I submitted an Instructsble that would save people who can use it some money. It was not featured, but it fits a contest and I entered it. Suddenly somebody is looking at it and marking it as a favorite more than if it had been featured.

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  • Phil B commented on pjrobinson's instructable Bicycle Helmet Hat Brim4 weeks ago
    Bicycle Helmet Hat Brim

    A few years ago I turned up with some skin cancer. I added a brim made of corrugated cardboard and painted it with black spray paint. Reading I have done indicates some materials are pretty good for blocking UV rays and some are not. I do not ow sbout urethane foam. Cardboard, fabric, and paint are all pretty good in appropriate thicknesses. Also, I use my shadow to determine if I need to tip my head down more to be shaded by my brim. It is also helpful to use a weather app. that indicates the current UV rating for your area. Go riding when UV rays are not so strong. 0 to 2 is good. 3 is borderline. Higher is not good. Remember, too, that some UV rays will be reflected back up from surfaces on the ground.

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  • Phil B commented on luann2425's instructable Dealing With Instructables Rejection4 weeks ago
    Dealing With Instructables Rejection

    There is no explaining why some Instructables are featured and some are not. I have found submitting an Instructable in one category may result more easily in being featured, while submitting an Instructsble in a different category may not result in a featured Instructsble, even though both were of comparable quality. I once submitted an Instructsble that was not featured until month and nomths later. I do not know why. I have submitted Instructables that would save anyone using them a fair amount of money, but that did not count for anything. Often those featured are not very practical, nor will they save anyone any money. But, they have what the editors consider "cool." I gave up concern about being featured and simply hope people who need what I offer will find mine and ben...

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    There is no explaining why some Instructables are featured and some are not. I have found submitting an Instructable in one category may result more easily in being featured, while submitting an Instructsble in a different category may not result in a featured Instructsble, even though both were of comparable quality. I once submitted an Instructsble that was not featured until month and nomths later. I do not know why. I have submitted Instructables that would save anyone using them a fair amount of money, but that did not count for anything. Often those featured are not very practical, nor will they save anyone any money. But, they have what the editors consider "cool." I gave up concern about being featured and simply hope people who need what I offer will find mine and benefit from them. In time your Instructable will turn up in a garden variety Internet search and oeople will join Instructables just so they can ask you a question or make a comment. It is really nice when someone says they had taken a car or an appliance to several shops but no one was able to find the problem. However, they finally solved the problem when they read your Instructable. That is nice.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer4 weeks ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    The regular shroud is still in place. My feet are 3 feet or more from the blade. I do not force the tool to make it cut faster, but let it cut at its own pace. It makes only a little fine sawdust directed away from me.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Corroded Maglite 5 weeks ago
    Corroded Maglite

    Thank you for your comment and for the benefit of your experience. We keep a AA Maglite in a vehicle glove box. It is especially easy to forget sbout that one.

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  • Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer's weekly stats: 5 weeks ago
    • Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer
      779 views
      4 favorites
      3 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Display Case for a Military Honors Flag5 weeks ago
    Display Case for a Military Honors Flag

    i believe I took dimensions of the flag as they are rather than calculate what they should be. Quite some time after I made this, I saw an episode of the PBS woodworking show, "Rough Cut" in which Tommy MacDonald was making a flag case. He calculated what the sides should be, but to insure the ends come together without a gap, he marked, trimmed, and fitted them at what was supposed to be the 90 degree corner as the end oroduct actually was. That means a 90 degree corner that may not be exactly 90 degrees, but it closes without a gap and the eye does not notice.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer5 weeks ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    Thank you for your kind words. The blade, especially with 90 teeth, makes only a little fine sawdust. It really does not throw anything. Also, I let the blade contact the wood stalks at sbout the 3 o'clock position on the blade. The rotation is counter-clockwise. The sawdust is directed away from the operator. And, you can keep the blade speed a little lower rather than higher.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems5 weeks ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    I am not a small engine mechanic by training or by trade. Is the fuel tank elevated above the combustion chamber? I am wondering if the floating needle activated by the metering valve is not sealing and fuel can flow through by gravity. That might mean you need a new metering diaphragm. A plugged vent hole in the fuel tank cap usually stops the flow of fuel because air cannot get back into the tank to replace fuel leaving the tank. I recently read that more and more repair shops do not bother with diagnosing a carburetor problem, but simply replace the carburetor with a new one. If you can match up a replacement carburetor, the orice of a new one is often less than $15 or $20.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Uses for Spent K-Cups7 weeks ago
    Uses for Spent K-Cups

    It is good to hear from you, Bill. We no longer live down I-5 from you, but moved to Knoxville, Tennessee a year ago to be nearer to children and grandchildren for the day when we have fallen and cannot get up. The slide rule you see is a nice K & E given to me by the widow of a man over whose funeral I presided. No one in the family wanted it or knew how to use it. When we were getting ready to move, my wife feared our rental truck would be too small. I used another (plastic) slide rule extensively to calculate cubic footsge of the various stacks of boxes and other things in our garage. My calculations proved to be exactly correct snd the truck fit our load with room to spare, just as I calculated. I keep an old phone book in my shop. The top page is always a clean soft renewable s...

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    It is good to hear from you, Bill. We no longer live down I-5 from you, but moved to Knoxville, Tennessee a year ago to be nearer to children and grandchildren for the day when we have fallen and cannot get up. The slide rule you see is a nice K & E given to me by the widow of a man over whose funeral I presided. No one in the family wanted it or knew how to use it. When we were getting ready to move, my wife feared our rental truck would be too small. I used another (plastic) slide rule extensively to calculate cubic footsge of the various stacks of boxes and other things in our garage. My calculations proved to be exactly correct snd the truck fit our load with room to spare, just as I calculated. I keep an old phone book in my shop. The top page is always a clean soft renewable surface on which to work with things that could be marred or are dirty. I usually mix small amounts of epoxy on it. This idea was in a Popular Mechanics magazine in the 1980s, I think.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Improving a Hand Truck7 weeks ago
    Improving a Hand Truck

    Thank you for your comment. In the very late-1990s our church needed a hand truck for moving cases of paper and other things around. I made a hand truck from scrap steel I got at a local yard, and the base was overly large. That helped very much, but, I also added rope with a knot every 4 to 6 inches and a "V" catch to grab a knot. We were not moving at the time, and I had access to a stick welder. A year ago when I needed this solution to a problem, just about all of my tools were already sealed in various cardboard boxes and I had to make do with little more than you might find in a utility room cabinet drawer.Thank you for the report on the NordicTrack skier rollers and the fountain pens. I am very happy something I posted has been useful to you. If you read comments on the...

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    Thank you for your comment. In the very late-1990s our church needed a hand truck for moving cases of paper and other things around. I made a hand truck from scrap steel I got at a local yard, and the base was overly large. That helped very much, but, I also added rope with a knot every 4 to 6 inches and a "V" catch to grab a knot. We were not moving at the time, and I had access to a stick welder. A year ago when I needed this solution to a problem, just about all of my tools were already sealed in various cardboard boxes and I had to make do with little more than you might find in a utility room cabinet drawer.Thank you for the report on the NordicTrack skier rollers and the fountain pens. I am very happy something I posted has been useful to you. If you read comments on the skier roller cleaning, some official repair guys chastised me for using an unofficial repair to get more life from the rollers. it is also good to hear from someone else about the viability and longevity you have gotten from flushing metallic powder from the one-way roller bearings. Practical and inexpensive solutions to real problems are always rewarding. Thank you for reading things I posted, often to document so I remember all of the details in case I need them later, but also to share with friends known and unknown,

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine7 weeks ago
    Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine

    Thank you for the note superimposed on the image. Unfortunately, you must remove the bottom as I showed in the steps above. Congratulations on finding the part. The machine shown in the photos has had no use until about a month ago when someone borrowed it for s party. I was not at that party, but the fix shown here held up well.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems8 weeks ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    i listed a link to an on-line diagnostic help in my comment to 86suzuki directly below. It is close to s flow chart. About a month ago I worked on a chainsaw for a friend. Two repair shops told him he almost certainly needed a new metering diaphragm in his carburetor. After I got into the saw I found the diaphragm was fine. The fuel in his saw's tank was more than a year old. After mixing fresh fuel and replacing the old fuel with it, the saw ran great. I mention that because yu never know exactly what you have until you get into the machine. By the way, this chainsaw did not develop full power at first. Then I opened the High circuit mixture screw just a little and it was fine. I would check everything in a logical order, and I would make certain there are no air leaks anywhere in the ...

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    i listed a link to an on-line diagnostic help in my comment to 86suzuki directly below. It is close to s flow chart. About a month ago I worked on a chainsaw for a friend. Two repair shops told him he almost certainly needed a new metering diaphragm in his carburetor. After I got into the saw I found the diaphragm was fine. The fuel in his saw's tank was more than a year old. After mixing fresh fuel and replacing the old fuel with it, the saw ran great. I mention that because yu never know exactly what you have until you get into the machine. By the way, this chainsaw did not develop full power at first. Then I opened the High circuit mixture screw just a little and it was fine. I would check everything in a logical order, and I would make certain there are no air leaks anywhere in the crankcase.

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  • Phil B's instructable A Reed Switch's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • A Reed Switch
      248 views
      2 favorites
      5 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable A Reed Switch2 months ago
    A Reed Switch

    John,It sounds like an idea worth pursuing. I needed one reed switch now, and decided to make my own. Unfortunately, another part of the project fell apart, and now I do not need any reed switches. Thank you for your comment.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable A Reed Switch2 months ago
    A Reed Switch

    If I wanted to wait for shipment I could order a batch of reed switches most of which I will never use on the Internet. The $10 reference was to the current variety of reed switch with some auxillary electronics in a package that used to be simpler in design and sell for $3 at a big box store.

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  • Phil B posted an instructable A Reed Switch2 months ago
  • Phil B's instructable Copy Kindle Text's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • Copy Kindle Text
      107 views
      0 favorites
      0 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Car Battery Goes Dead After a Few Days2 months ago
    Car Battery Goes Dead After a Few Days

    Thank you for your comment. I am not a professional mechanic and have never owned a VW of any kind. I empathize with you in the problems you are having.I did a little cursory reading sbout electrical problems on the 1998 Beetle. Melted fuses and wiring harnesses, and outright fires, are not infrequent in the complaints. It seems an early sign of problems to come involves a lack of response from the heater/AC fan control. (The fan blows at the #2 setting no matter where the knob is set.) Some had the engine die in traffic, or the horn began to blow during the night with no known stimulus. I did not find your exact problem.The melted fuses and wiring harnesses suggests a heavy unusual current draw. That could also fit with your drained battery. My first thought is something simple, like t...

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    Thank you for your comment. I am not a professional mechanic and have never owned a VW of any kind. I empathize with you in the problems you are having.I did a little cursory reading sbout electrical problems on the 1998 Beetle. Melted fuses and wiring harnesses, and outright fires, are not infrequent in the complaints. It seems an early sign of problems to come involves a lack of response from the heater/AC fan control. (The fan blows at the #2 setting no matter where the knob is set.) Some had the engine die in traffic, or the horn began to blow during the night with no known stimulus. I did not find your exact problem.The melted fuses and wiring harnesses suggests a heavy unusual current draw. That could also fit with your drained battery. My first thought is something simple, like the wiring crosses over a rough metal edge at a body seam and eventually wears through the insulation to cause an electrical short.In step #1 of this Instructable I described how to use an Ammeter to check current draw in a circuit. If you do not have a digital multimeter, Harbor Freight has one for around $5 that is often free with one of their ubiquitous coupons from the Sunday paper or an advertisement in a magazine and a small purchase. Start with the 10 Amp. range just to be safe and work back to the milliamps. ranges to avoid blowing a fuse inside the meter. (I had to go to Amazon to find replacement fuses. They are an odd size.)I would want to know the current draw when the car is parked by the curb, and then with the engine running. Is it higher than 50 to 100 milliamps when nothing is running? If so, I would pull a fuse and check the current draw. Replace the fuse and pull another. You are trying to determine which system has the excessive current draw. Then follow the wires for that system as best you can with your hand looking for any signs insulation is worn or frayed. (If you cannot follow the wire various places, try disconnecting it between the battery and where the wire becomes inaccessible to your reach. Ockam's Razor says the simplest explanation is usually the best. The problem could be a component failure, but is more likely to be something simple, like worn insulation. This is a tedious process, but it may eliminate a possible cause, which advances the inquiry.

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  • Phil B commented on woodbywright's instructable Wooden Try Square2 months ago
    Wooden Try Square

    Here is a photo that includes the smaller of my two aluminum and walnut squares. It is from a step in an Instructsble on an angle divider for really good miters from a couple of years ago.

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  • Phil B commented on woodbywright's instructable Wooden Try Square2 months ago
    Wooden Try Square

    Very nice. I visited San Juan Capistrano about five years ago. Some of the original tools used to build the various buildings are on display, and one of those is a wooden square very similar to yours. I tried to make a couple of similar squares from aluminum bar for the blade and walnut for the handles. They look very nice, and I wanted to make some for gifts. I used epoxy to glue the aluminum blade into the wooden handle. To my surprise, the epoxy contracted when it hardened and I had use a file by hand to make the top and bottom edges of the aluminum square again.

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  • Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • Metal Cutting Bandsaw
      1,414 views
      26 favorites
      13 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw2 months ago
    Metal Cutting Bandsaw

    Thank you. When I try to open your video file I get an error message. Could you post a still photo or two?

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw2 months ago
    Metal Cutting Bandsaw

    Thank you for your comment. At first tI had some trouble with accuracy when cutting with the very similar one of these I made for my son-in-law. I began to feel I could do as well with a hacksaw by hand. But, after extending the cut line and marking in on the table, i am much more accurate now. Still, good lighting and watching from a reasonably close distance also help a lot. People make these with all sorts of variations, according to what they have for tools and methods. I have found one of these works quite well, even if something is not quite as solid or accurate as you hoped. And, the blade travels so slowly that many anticipated problems just do not happen. One guy hung his on a wooden fixture attached to a stud in his workshop wall. The two man variations appear to be whether th...

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    Thank you for your comment. At first tI had some trouble with accuracy when cutting with the very similar one of these I made for my son-in-law. I began to feel I could do as well with a hacksaw by hand. But, after extending the cut line and marking in on the table, i am much more accurate now. Still, good lighting and watching from a reasonably close distance also help a lot. People make these with all sorts of variations, according to what they have for tools and methods. I have found one of these works quite well, even if something is not quite as solid or accurate as you hoped. And, the blade travels so slowly that many anticipated problems just do not happen. One guy hung his on a wooden fixture attached to a stud in his workshop wall. The two man variations appear to be whether the saw table attaches to the saw or to supports from the base of the stand. I wish you well with yours. Post some photos when you are finished.

    There are dozens of videos on saw stands people have made. No one clamps them in. They are very solid and stable without clamping. This Milwaukee has a very similar speed adjustment. Top speed is very slow.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw2 months ago
    Metal Cutting Bandsaw

    i do not believe I implied I made a bandsaw, although I did do that once about 40 years ago. It was for cutting wood and worked reasonably well.

    There are some videos at YouTube that show these saws cutting some heavy steel, like a rail iron. I have cut up to 3/8" steel with the identical setup I made for my son-in-law with another saw. It was faster than by hand. I am using a 24 teeth per inch blade on this one because I like the smoother cut, but I think a finer blade cuts more slowly. My son-in-law's blade was probably about 15 teeth per inch.Too much blade speed does destroy a good steel cutting bandsaw blade quickly. Working up a set of speed reduction pulleys for your wood bandsaw would be a lot of expense and bother. For about $20 US you can buy an electronic motor speed reducer that handles up to 15 Amperes of load current. Just plug it in and you are ready to go. It uses a solid state Triac to switch the motor on a...

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    There are some videos at YouTube that show these saws cutting some heavy steel, like a rail iron. I have cut up to 3/8" steel with the identical setup I made for my son-in-law with another saw. It was faster than by hand. I am using a 24 teeth per inch blade on this one because I like the smoother cut, but I think a finer blade cuts more slowly. My son-in-law's blade was probably about 15 teeth per inch.Too much blade speed does destroy a good steel cutting bandsaw blade quickly. Working up a set of speed reduction pulleys for your wood bandsaw would be a lot of expense and bother. For about $20 US you can buy an electronic motor speed reducer that handles up to 15 Amperes of load current. Just plug it in and you are ready to go. It uses a solid state Triac to switch the motor on and off many times a second, just like the control on a variable speed drill.Thank for looking and for commenting.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work3 months ago
    Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work

    Welcome to Instructsbles! I hope you enjoy the site. My father tried to explain 4-way switches, but I did not get it. Finally, it clicked for me. I hope the day comes when you can use this to make one of these circuits work after it had not worked. People will think you are amazing. Thank you for looking.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Jerusalem Cross of Welded Concrete Nails3 months ago
    Jerusalem Cross of Welded Concrete Nails

    I like it very much. Thank you for posting a photo of it. I feel thankful and orivileged to have a welder. I went many years without one. If the opportunity ever comes to you, you will not regret having a welder.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make an Electric Motor Run Again3 months ago
    Make an Electric Motor Run Again

    You could find there are several wires coming out of the motor and they are all sorts of colors other than black and white. Put a little black tape on all wires connecting to the black wire from the cord just to mark them. Connect all wires from the black wire to one screw on the switch. Connect the black wire to the other screw. Leave all wires connected to the white wire as they are.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes3 months ago
    Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes

    Actually, I found this idea in some litersture from Slime.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make an Electric Motor Run Again3 months ago
    Make an Electric Motor Run Again

    You should be able to get a single pole on/off switch at a hardware store or a home improvement store. If you are in the USA get a switch that can handle 125 volts or more. Many other countries use 230 or 240 volts as the standard. Some 12 volt automotive switches look the same, but do not offer the same protections. You switch also needs to accomodate more than the Amperage draw of the motor. If the motor draws 12 Amps., a 15 Amp. switch is probably adequate, but 20 Amps. would be better. Wiring the switch is easy enough. Connect the white wires to each other. Connect one black wire to one of the screws on the switch and the other black wire to the other screw.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack4 months ago
    Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack

    bronco_5, I understand your distress about links that go dead. When that happens to me, I know two things, both useful. One, something helpful once existed at that link and may still exist at a new link. Two, there are enough clues in information about the link that I have a good head start in finding it on my own. When you publish your first Instructable, you will find ways to handle these things are not as simple as they appear to you now.

    The "C" ring rests in a groove around the inside of the cylinder, no doubt. Does it have ends cut at an angle? Can you gently pry under one of those ends and slide some sheet metal under the end until you raise enough of the "C" ring that you can get it out? Hopefully the surface of the cylinder is harder than the "C" ring and will not be damaged.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Airline Travel Tips4 months ago
    Airline Travel Tips

    Thank you for the link. My life has changd in the last 8 years and I no longer need to travel as much. Now I also have a Kindle e-reader and can carry a whole library on one thin device, so there is less reason to be bored. And, airlines often have on-board WiFi I can access free to see a map that shows where the plane is. We went to Europe in 2000. I read a tell-all book about secret thngs relsted to overseas jet travel and how to cope with them. I asked a friend, a former airline pilot, about one of the things and he said it was not really that way. That is about the extent of what I have read sbout travel tips.

    Thank you

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems4 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    I am not a small engine mechanic. In this Instructsble I simoly offered some thngs I found that are not always discussed in troubleshooting charts and their cure. Here is a link to a troubleshooting chart for 2-cycle engines. http://www.smallengineadvisor.com/members/2stroke/...It is not always a fast prccess, but explore possible solutions to problem descriptions that most closely describe your symptoms. Be sure you are using new clean fuel properly mixed for your engine.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems4 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    I would not be surprised if you have an air leak in one of the gaskets due to a loose screw. Have you worked through the things in this Instructable?

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  • Phil B's instructable Deep Throat Hacksaw's weekly stats: 4 months ago
    • Deep Throat Hacksaw
      484 views
      5 favorites
      4 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Reconstructive Surgery for a Suitcase4 months ago
    Reconstructive Surgery for a Suitcase

    It appears from the photos that you are able to remove the tube from the suitcase. I was concerned the problem would be somewhere inaccessible. 1) Could you simply replace the tube with a new piece of square tubing? 2) Could you drive a square piece of steel into the tube to push the dent back out? [This would be risky because the square steel would likely become lodged in the tube you are trying to fix, and you would need to be able to drive it out with another rod from the other end.] 3) Perhaps you could use a Dremel tool and a cutting wheel to remove the indentation. Then just leave an opening where the dent was, or have someone weld a patch in place with a MIG welder. Those are my ideas.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Deep Throat Hacksaw4 months ago
    Deep Throat Hacksaw

    Thank you very kindly. A MIG welder is a big help, as opposed to stick or flux core wire. Still, there are opportunities for numerous mistskes. Someone said we never become weldors, but we are always becoming weldors.

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  • Phil B commented on chienline's instructable How to Win Prizes at Instructables4 months ago
    How to Win Prizes at Instructables

    Encouraging disappointed authors is a very good thing. A nice aspect of Instructsbles in general is their "be nice policy." We have likely all had someone criticize one of our Instructables in very unfair and cruel ways. I have found those people usually have never submitted an Instructable themselves. I once posted about an idea that worked very well for me. When this guy tore my idea apart, I said I hoped he would publish his first Instructsble soon so we could comment on his work. Anyway, I just wanted to share my experience as someone who had decided never to enter snother contest, who did finally enter some other contests and won a couple of prizes, and who has also been asked a couple of times to participate in the judging.

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  • Phil B commented on chienline's instructable How to Win Prizes at Instructables4 months ago
    How to Win Prizes at Instructables

    I submitted a comment to the Instructsble by Mrballeng that you linked. I have won prizes in a contest a couple of times. I have also been a judge in a couple of other contests. From my experience as a judge, a winner first has to gather favorable response from ordinary site users to make the cut for those considered by judges. I took that responsibility very seriously and looked for entries that were good practical clever ideas presented well. If they would save the maker money, that was a bonus in my mind. I took my time judging and looked at my choices again several times before submitting them. Usually my choices were very close to those of other judges unknown to me. Then our reduced field went to folks at Instructables for final mudging and I have no idea how that worked. The time...

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    I submitted a comment to the Instructsble by Mrballeng that you linked. I have won prizes in a contest a couple of times. I have also been a judge in a couple of other contests. From my experience as a judge, a winner first has to gather favorable response from ordinary site users to make the cut for those considered by judges. I took that responsibility very seriously and looked for entries that were good practical clever ideas presented well. If they would save the maker money, that was a bonus in my mind. I took my time judging and looked at my choices again several times before submitting them. Usually my choices were very close to those of other judges unknown to me. Then our reduced field went to folks at Instructables for final mudging and I have no idea how that worked. The times when I did win something, it was part a good idea that appealed to quite a few others and I was making the submission at the right time. No real strategy beyond a good idea done well at the right time would have helped me.

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  • Phil B commented on Mrballeng's instructable How to Win Instructables Contests.4 months ago
    How to Win Instructables Contests.

    I have entered a few more contests than prizes I have won. At one point I resolved never again to enter another contest. I have also been a judge in a couple of contests. My task and that of other judges was to narrow the field for final judging by site members. I took that task very seriously and looked at my choices several times before submitting them. Most of my choices, but not all, agreed with the choices of the other judges. Still, the final results rested with users who responded in the open voting. As concerns judging, I looked for good clever practical ideas presented well. If the Instructsble would save someone who made it some money, that was a bonus in its favor. I did not favor something novel just because it was novel. When I rebelled against ever entering another contest...

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    I have entered a few more contests than prizes I have won. At one point I resolved never again to enter another contest. I have also been a judge in a couple of contests. My task and that of other judges was to narrow the field for final judging by site members. I took that task very seriously and looked at my choices several times before submitting them. Most of my choices, but not all, agreed with the choices of the other judges. Still, the final results rested with users who responded in the open voting. As concerns judging, I looked for good clever practical ideas presented well. If the Instructsble would save someone who made it some money, that was a bonus in its favor. I did not favor something novel just because it was novel. When I rebelled against ever entering another contest, I was turned off by how some high quality efforts got little favor in the results, but something that looked "cool" won a nice prize, even though there was very little real substance in it. (That actually haopened.)I wish I could say I carefully planned entering Instructables that won prizes for specific contests. I did not. In one case I won a MIG welder on an Instructsble I almost did not submit. That was because I had earlier worked very hard on a somewhat similar Instructable that got only a few views and very little response even though it was not for a contest or entered in a contest. But, I had taken photos in case I did write and submit an Instructsble. I confess I decided to give it a try when I saw the prizes offered. The rest was a happy accident. I did nothing to promote votes for my Instructsble, but let it rest on its own merits. When it became apparent I was one of the finalists and would win something, I told myself repeatedly that it would be one on the lowest tier of prizes. When I did win one of the top three prizes, i quickly sent a thank you e-mail to the sponsor and got a nice note of appreciation in return. Sayng "thank you" to someone who provides a nice prize is always good. If I were to develop a strategy for winning, I would have some photos in my files ready for submitting an Instructable. I would wait until a contest came along that I thought my idea could compete in. Then I would write up and submit my Instructable to be within the time frame required by the rules. As it is, several times i have seen a contest that fits something I have already done, but the time frame is way off and I cannot submit that Instructable in the current contest.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Deep Throat Hacksaw4 months ago
    Deep Throat Hacksaw

    Thank you you for looking and for commenting. You could use a variety of materials and tools for this, depending on what you have avaioable to yourself. I simoly wanted to see what I could do with thinwall electrical conduit.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine4 months ago
    Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine

    Thank you for looking at this. This drive coupling for the blender on these machines is certainly a weak link. Unfortunately, Sunbeam does not make any of the blender drive parts available to the public. The high torque demands on the blender drive make it difficult to find a home fix that will last. You can try building up what is lost with a resin. JB Weld might be a good material to use. You can get it at any hardware store. Getting just the right shape on the teeth might be much easier if you can set the blender down onto the drive while the JB Weld is still very soft. But, you would also want to use a release agent, perhaps a thin application of Vaseline, on the teeth in the blender so the blender is not permanently cemented to the base. I really wish there were an easy way to repl...

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    Thank you for looking at this. This drive coupling for the blender on these machines is certainly a weak link. Unfortunately, Sunbeam does not make any of the blender drive parts available to the public. The high torque demands on the blender drive make it difficult to find a home fix that will last. You can try building up what is lost with a resin. JB Weld might be a good material to use. You can get it at any hardware store. Getting just the right shape on the teeth might be much easier if you can set the blender down onto the drive while the JB Weld is still very soft. But, you would also want to use a release agent, perhaps a thin application of Vaseline, on the teeth in the blender so the blender is not permanently cemented to the base. I really wish there were an easy way to replace the plastic teeth on the drive with something made from metal, but i do not yet have any good ideas on how to do it.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems5 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    Does your carburetor have a float, or is it pulse carburetor using a diaphragm? If it uses a float, the float could have absorbed enough gasoline over the years that it has become hesvy. When the engine warms up the fuel becomes hotter and less buoyant. The float does not shut off the flow of gasoline when it should snd too much enters the engine, causing the engine to stumble. Also check to see if debris is blocking the air flow through the cowling and cooling fins. If these things are not your problem, do an Internet search for hot run problems in a 2-cycle engine.

    The answer to your problem is in the Introduction above. You have an air leak, probably from a poirly seated gasket. Choking the engine reduces the amount of air entering through the carburetor so the mixture is more nearly what it should be due to extra air entering through leaks. Tighten carburetor mounting screws and crankcase screws. Replace gaskets if tightening screws does not solve the problem.

    i do not inow. Check YouTube for a video on it.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Steel Belt Clip for an Otterbox Case5 months ago
    Steel Belt Clip for an Otterbox Case

    Let's talk with private messages. I am out of town for a week.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts5 months ago
    The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts

    This is my second response. There may also be a red reset button. If the motor overheats, the reset trips the circuit to protect the motor. Pressing the button closes the circuit again.

    First, the colored buttons were a sales gimmic by Sears/Craftsman to make the saw seem easier to use because a colored scale on part of the saw matches and is controlled by a button or lever with the same color on it. Other manufacturers, even earlier versions of the same saw may not have colors.The arbor is the shaft in the motor. What appears as a red button on the end of the motor arbor opposite the blade end is probably not a control button, but a thread protector. It screws off to reveal a threaded end of the shaft useful for attaching a 1/2" drill chuck or a sanding drum.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Erratic Instrument Panel on GM Cars5 months ago
    Erratic Instrument Panel on GM Cars

    Soon after this Instructsble I found the ignition switch was also my real problem, and I did another Instructsble on changing that fairly easily. I removed the instrument cluster and pulled the ignition switch out through the opening left by the instrument cluster. I did need to heat and bend one end of a boxed wrench to access two mounting bolts behind the finished dashboard.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fountain Pen Problems6 months ago
    Fountain Pen Problems

    Thank you, Amy. If your pen has an ink reservoir, its delivery system would be very similar to that found in a fountain pen. I am glad to have been helpful.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts6 months ago
    The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts

    I am assuming radial arm saws are not often seen currently where you live. They have become less popular and less available in recent years. In some parts of the world they may never have been available and many have never seen one. A radial arm saw allows you to cut wood to length with 90 degree cuts. This is done by pulling the motor carriage (on rollers) toward the operator with a stiff arm and shoulder to keep the blade from grabbing and propelling itself toward the operator. (If the saw is properly aligned, it does not bind, and this is not a problem.) The blade may be tilted to cut with a bevel cut. A knob and a locking pin near the handle on the motor carriage are used to change the tilt of the blade. Another knob cranks an elevation screw that raises the motor or lowers the moto...

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    I am assuming radial arm saws are not often seen currently where you live. They have become less popular and less available in recent years. In some parts of the world they may never have been available and many have never seen one. A radial arm saw allows you to cut wood to length with 90 degree cuts. This is done by pulling the motor carriage (on rollers) toward the operator with a stiff arm and shoulder to keep the blade from grabbing and propelling itself toward the operator. (If the saw is properly aligned, it does not bind, and this is not a problem.) The blade may be tilted to cut with a bevel cut. A knob and a locking pin near the handle on the motor carriage are used to change the tilt of the blade. Another knob cranks an elevation screw that raises the motor or lowers the motor by raising or lowering the arm on which the motor carriage is mounted. That means your cuts can form a dado groove rather than a complete separation cut. The motor carriage has a locking lever and an indexing pin that can be used to swivel the motor 90 degrees to the left or to the right. This is for making rip cuts. A fence on the saw table guides the wood. There are two swivel positions: an inrip and an outrip position. These are necessary so any width can be ripped. Two positions are necessary because the blade is offset from the swivel axis. (Cross cutting keeps the wood stationary while the saw motor moves. Rip cutting keeps the motor in a stationary position while the wood is fed from one side of the saw table to the other, much like ripping with a table saw. The arm may be cranked up to make a dado cut rather than a separation cut. The blade may also be tilted to make a beveled rip cut. And, a knob on the arm can be loosened so the arm can swing 45 degrees to the right or the left for making miter cuts. An index pin on the arm helps lock the arm position at 45 degrees left, 90 degrees, and at 45 degrees right.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack6 months ago
    Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack

    We moved to another state and my brother-in-law now has the jack. All I can advise is to contact Blackhawk. I do remember they had quite a number of repair kits and I puzzled over a chart a good long while before I ordered. I may have contacted them before I ordered. I wish I could be more help.

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  • Phil B commented on GarageBot's instructable Cheap Simple Welding Cart6 months ago
    Cheap Simple Welding Cart

    It is really difficult to see well when welding flux core wire. A fan to blow away the smoke while welding is very helpful. Marking the weld bead path with chalk sometimes helps. So does extra light. A very easy thing that helps is to tack at both ends and then weld a short segment of a quarter inch or so toward the tack, After a short segment weld to the start of the last short segment. Enough light reflects from the end of each short segment to keep you bead on track. (Clean away slap between short segments to avoid slag inclusions.)

    If you look at my various Instructsbles, you will see some really bad welding, but it holds together to do what it needs to do. What I wrote are some things I wish I had learned earlier. I have a gas shielded MIG now and it is easier to use than the flux core welder, but flux core does a good job and has some benefits when needed. I saw something that said no one is a welder, but we are all learning to be a welder. By the way, many people with your machine add a ten dollar bridge rectifier to it because your machine is AC output, but flux core works better with DC. There are videos about the conversion at YouTube. Amazon sells the bridge rectifier. Thank you for your Instructable. Good job!

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Keep Your Breath Warm in Cold Weather6 months ago
    Keep Your Breath Warm in Cold Weather

    Thank you for looking and commenting. These work amazingly well after a few minutes of warmup. I wish 3M had continues to make and sell them.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Auto Battery Charger for 6 or 12 Volt Sytems7 months ago
    Auto Battery Charger for 6 or 12 Volt Sytems

    You made me learn something. I found this page about charging AGM batteries by Optima. Low and slow is best, but they mention 1 to 10 amp. chargers as acceptable. Simple circuits for a current limiter using a regulator chip and a very few resistors and capacitors, maybe a diode or two can be used to make your own limiter. You could also contact the maker of your battery to see what they say. https://www.optimabatteries.com/en-us/support/charging/charging-agm-battery

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes7 months ago
    Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes

    Thank you for looking and for commenting. I have never had an impact flat like you describe. Slime is effective with pinhole leaks. Do potholes cause the tube to tear? Slime would not be effective on a tear. Once I knew how long Slime is supposed to hold up. I am guessing it would still work until one year. I usually had a failure of some kind that required replacing the tube within a year or two, anyway.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Child's Wooden Coin-Operated Gumball Machine7 months ago
    Child's Wooden Coin-Operated Gumball Machine

    Caleb,Thank you for your note and for your pictures. I am able to follow the path the coin follows, and you have been very clever with the top of the coin pushing the hinged plate. I am not sure I understand the pathway the candy takes. The only suggestion I can make is to build a prototype from expendable materials so you can work out any unexpected problems. Then make your final version using what you have learned. Very good job!

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  • Phil B commented on tomatoskins's instructable Table Saw Disc Sander7 months ago
    Table Saw Disc Sander

    Sears sold these for table saws back around 1970. But, theirs had a very helpful variation. The disc was not flat, but was a slight cone that angled from the center out at 2 degrees. That eliminated circular scoring marks and made it possible to use the disc for joining boards as if they had been prepared on a planer. Naturally, the tilt on the table saw had to be set to 2 degrees.

    Sears sold these for table saws back around 1970. But, theirs had a very helpful variation. The disc was not flat, but was a slight one that angled from the center out at 2 degrees. That eliminated circular scoring marks and made it possible to use the disc for joining boards as if they had been prepared on a planer. Naturally, the tilt on the table saw had to be set to 2 degrees.

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  • Phil B commented on bricobart's instructable 18th Century Style Custom Pistol (nerf)7 months ago
    18th Century Style Custom Pistol (nerf)

    What you copied from the ATF says a non-licensed gun maker must pay a tax and get advance approval from the ATF before making a gun. Why do you say I am wrong for saying you must get approval before making a gun? I appreciate that you found and copied the official document. I paraphrased someone's description of the regulations.

    I was careful to state what I found is in regard to United States regulations. I know many at Instructables reside across the entire world. I also know that gun laws are much more restrictive in many other countries than they are in the United States.

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