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4CommentsCincinnati, OHJoined November 15th, 2015
Created popular & award winning logo design for 2008 Obama campaign, Former OS Developer for Apple Mac platform
  • Questor1 commented on Phil B's instructable Maglite Switch Replacement3 months ago
    Maglite Switch Replacement

    Hi Phil,Your "Maglite Switch Replacement" article needs to be changed. The 3rd Party company's URL Links for disassembly instructions and replacement parts about Maglite "D" Flashlights are broken and need to be modified or removed... The URL http://www.orderoutdoors.com/msr_2.html does not work at all because the orderoutdoors.com website is shut down and the Domain Name is up for sale as of 4/22/19 !Could you please post the shut down website's disassembly instructions you briefly mention in your article or suggest where else replacement Maglite D Flashlight parts can be found? Regards, SteveCincinnati, OH

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  • Questor1 followed organizing, electronics, audio, magic-tricks and 8 others channel 8 months ago
  • Make Metal Parts With a 3D Printer (lost Polymer Casting Tutorial)

    The final product shrinkage percentage seems dependent upon:1.) the casting metal elements composition, 2.) the "lost wax" polymer burnout material physical properties under high heat3.) melting temp of the casting metal materials, and 4.) how long in duration has the casting metal mix has been heated. + extended or repeated heating may affect the casting metal % composition and physical properties.The article author Lyratron uses Pewter (Lead/Tin mix percentages are not discussed) for the casting metal and recommends increasing the Polymer mold size by 2%. He does not discuss what is the melting temp of the Pewter casting metal materials.However, articles I have read about casting 260 Grade Brass (1850 deg F) parts recommend increasing the Polymer mold size by 4%

    Air Bubbles occur when mixing/stirring the Mortar with Water and can be difficult to remove from the Mortar/Water mix.The article author does not mention which Manufacturer/Brand/Product Name he chose to use for the Mortar material. I suggest using use Distilled Water (not Tap Water) for more consistent results.Vibration or agitation can be applied to the Mortar/Water mix to help move the air bubbles to the top of the container and release the Air. The amount and duration of vibration/agitation that is needed may depend upon many factors that could be hard to consistently measure.I do not know of any easy nor cheap way to consistently measure the percentage of air within a Mortar/Water mix. Air bubble pockets could be randomly found and suspended anywhere within a Mortar/Water mix.How...

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    Air Bubbles occur when mixing/stirring the Mortar with Water and can be difficult to remove from the Mortar/Water mix.The article author does not mention which Manufacturer/Brand/Product Name he chose to use for the Mortar material. I suggest using use Distilled Water (not Tap Water) for more consistent results.Vibration or agitation can be applied to the Mortar/Water mix to help move the air bubbles to the top of the container and release the Air. The amount and duration of vibration/agitation that is needed may depend upon many factors that could be hard to consistently measure.I do not know of any easy nor cheap way to consistently measure the percentage of air within a Mortar/Water mix. Air bubble pockets could be randomly found and suspended anywhere within a Mortar/Water mix.However to make a consistent and more effective Mortar/Water mix, you can try to:1.) experiment with the Mortar/Water percentage mix, + do not make the Mortar/Water mix too thick or else it may dry too quickly or while vibrating2.) *slowly* stir the Mortar/Water mix to reduce the amount of Air Bubbles that may gather within the mix3.) gently and completely insert the 3D printing Polymer object with its Sprue into the agitated Mortar/Water mix.4.) suspend the Sprue above the Mortar/Water mix and agitate or vibrate the Mortar/Water mix for a short period of time to remove any remaining air bubbles around the Polymer object.

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  • Questor1 completed the lesson Class Overview in the class 3D Printing Class2 years ago
  • Questor1 commented on MaxPower1977's instructable How to Make a Propane Forge2 years ago
    How to Make a Propane Forge

    I want to melt 260 Brass scrap from cut-up materials in a small ?rectangle? ceramic cruicible to make small 260 Brass ingots. These small ingots would later be re-melted by me for casting small and thin brass parts from "Lost Wax" casting molds.1.) Can a ceramic front door or gate be safely and effectively added to help increase internal temperatures more quickly while reducing heat loss? This could also reduce higher Propane usage and costs...2.) How much or what volume of Propane Gas is used to heat up your Propane Forge during an average use? I realize this depends on the Forge construction/materials, the temp/humidity/weather conditions, and the amount/type of metal to be melted. However, I'm trying to roughly estimate the total propane usage and cost for average use.3...

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    I want to melt 260 Brass scrap from cut-up materials in a small ?rectangle? ceramic cruicible to make small 260 Brass ingots. These small ingots would later be re-melted by me for casting small and thin brass parts from "Lost Wax" casting molds.1.) Can a ceramic front door or gate be safely and effectively added to help increase internal temperatures more quickly while reducing heat loss? This could also reduce higher Propane usage and costs...2.) How much or what volume of Propane Gas is used to heat up your Propane Forge during an average use? I realize this depends on the Forge construction/materials, the temp/humidity/weather conditions, and the amount/type of metal to be melted. However, I'm trying to roughly estimate the total propane usage and cost for average use.3.) Which Metal Element names were you able to effectively melt in a Ceramic Cruicible? 4.) Did you place the metals to be melted inside the Propane Forge when it is "cold" or else after the Propane is "hot" and at high temperature? It seems that placing these metals while the Forge is "cold" saves heating time, reduces propane costs, and may be somewhat safer than trying to insert a ceramic crucible into a hot Propane Forge with a small opening...5.) Is your Propane Forge recommended to be used only on concrete bricks, or a concrete floor, or in a sandy "pit" ?Thanks, SteveCincinnati, Ohio

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