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  • RanT1 commented on TecnoProfesor's instructable RGB LED Newton´s Cradle4 weeks ago
    RGB LED Newton´s Cradle

    That's really ingenious, simulating the swinging with two servos, instead of trying to make an actual cradle with all the LED-filled balls banging into each other. Even if you could get the mechanics to work, getting the LED sequencing right could be a nightmare.Did you consider using WS2811 or WS2812 modules, instead of "bare" RGB LEDs? It would simplify the wiring, and drastically cut the number of I/O pins needed. You could build it with a Micro or Nano, instead of a Mega.Thanks for sharing this.

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  • Solar Powered WiFi Weather Station V2.0

    Nice job, Debasish!It's especially good that you went with "overkill" on the solar panel, and remote checking of the battery state: I have some solar-powered remote sensor systems running, and it's inevitable that, if you don't do that, you'll get unpleasant surprises when you have a string of cloudy days.One thing that concerns me, though, is the accuracy of your temperature readings. I've done a couple of systems that used commercial weather stations to get remote readings. Right now, even with the white commercial housing with lots of ventilation that's supposed to prevent it, we're getting wildly high readings on sunny days, and I'm going to have to do something to keep the sensor in the shade. A colored housing will, by its very nature, only reflect some of the incoming s...

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    Nice job, Debasish!It's especially good that you went with "overkill" on the solar panel, and remote checking of the battery state: I have some solar-powered remote sensor systems running, and it's inevitable that, if you don't do that, you'll get unpleasant surprises when you have a string of cloudy days.One thing that concerns me, though, is the accuracy of your temperature readings. I've done a couple of systems that used commercial weather stations to get remote readings. Right now, even with the white commercial housing with lots of ventilation that's supposed to prevent it, we're getting wildly high readings on sunny days, and I'm going to have to do something to keep the sensor in the shade. A colored housing will, by its very nature, only reflect some of the incoming solar energy. And there's an inherent conflict between getting good airflow and keeping the rain out in a small housing. Since you wisely included the option of a DS18B20, I think it would be very useful to do some long-term testing with one in a separate, very-well-ventilated and shaded housing to see how different its readings are. I think it's likely that the results will lead to a recommendation that most people use that, and only rely on the internal sensor for humidity.It would be really helpful to have a supplier for onesies and twosies of the PCB. If you're not interested in getting into the mail-order business, or getting someone like SparkFun to distribute them, I know a person in the U.S. who sells Wemos modules as a side business who might be interested. I can give you his email address if you send me a private message, or post a link to his website if that's okay with you.Thanks for sharing your good work,Ran

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  • 4000 Pixel Animated LED Mural [Cheap and Simple*]

    Extremely cool! Have you noticed a significant change in the number and/or gender mix of visitors since you put an animated nekkid lady on your wall? ;-)Some suggestions that I think would improve the construction and the operation:1. Before installing the LEDs, clamp the panels to the rails, and drill them for tee nuts to be used to hold them together. Reduces the risk of a slip-up with a tool causing damage after all the installation of the LEDs, makes assembling easier, and will make it easier to pack and move when you graduate.2. All those LEDs turning on and off generate a lot of current spikes on the power bus. This can cause reliability problems. You should have capacitors at regular intervals to smooth those out. Ask one of the EEs how big and many they need to be (I'm mostly a...

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    Extremely cool! Have you noticed a significant change in the number and/or gender mix of visitors since you put an animated nekkid lady on your wall? ;-)Some suggestions that I think would improve the construction and the operation:1. Before installing the LEDs, clamp the panels to the rails, and drill them for tee nuts to be used to hold them together. Reduces the risk of a slip-up with a tool causing damage after all the installation of the LEDs, makes assembling easier, and will make it easier to pack and move when you graduate.2. All those LEDs turning on and off generate a lot of current spikes on the power bus. This can cause reliability problems. You should have capacitors at regular intervals to smooth those out. Ask one of the EEs how big and many they need to be (I'm mostly a software guy who does some simple electronic design, so I only know that they're needed, not how much).3. Make sure you have fuses on the power buses. If you don't, Murphy's Law says that it's 99% certain that someone will find an improbable way to short it. I think that probability may increase to 99.8% in a college dorm room ;-)Thanks for sharing it. I dunno whether I'll build one, but the "pixellated" art is interesting, and brings back memories of people doing drawings with line printers and Teletypes back in the 1970s.

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  • Spooky Teddy - Arduino Powered Self-rocking Chair & Rotating Head

    That bear mechanism is really ingenious!I'm a little surprised that you needed it, though: my first thought was that the bear stuffing should dampen the sound enough to use a servo, which would give you finer control over the head movement. I guess I was wrong?Thanks for sharing it.

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  • RanT1 commented on rgco's instructable Arduino Waveform Generator7 months ago
    Arduino Waveform Generator

    I've been shopping for one of these, too. A couple of things I've found in my research:There's a successor to the model in this Instructable, called the DSO150 (the one above is the DSO138). It's the same electronic design, but the mechanical design is very different. It's case-friendly (and often comes bundled with a case), so you can actually carry it around as a "pocket" scope.I've seen a couple of user comments that it's also easier to assemble.And I've seen at least one warning that it's a little fussy about the power supply: it says "9V", and it means it. If you go much lower, the onboard voltage regulator drops out. If you go much higher (like, say, with a 3S LiPo battery), the regulator may "release its magic smoke".

    Nice job! I have a need for something portable that generates more-complex waveforms at low frequencies, and this may well be the basis for it.One suggestion: you can buy R2R ladders as SIPs or DIPs, and will probably get a closer match by using one. Plus you save a bunch of board space and soldering. I found the Bourns 4610X-R2R-103LF (10K SIP) for a buck at Mouser, and it's probably available at about the same price from Digi-Key, Farnell, etc.Thanks for sharing this.

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  • Easy Peanut Butter Fudge | 4 Ingredients!

    What kinds of peanut butter have you used? Most of the popular ones have sugar, other oils, and miscellaneous other ingredients added that might change the taste and/or mixing characteristics compared to the simple "peanuts and salt" products I mostly eat. Or are the differences too small to matter? Thanks,Ran

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  • RanT1 commented on carl5blum's instructable Insulation Displacement Screw Terminals9 months ago
    Insulation Displacement Screw Terminals

    Electric currents only produce heat when they flow through a resistance. If the resistance is near-zero, they will produce near-zero heat.You're right to raise a warning: it could be very dangerous to use this technique to wire up high voltages or circuits where very high currents might flow even at low voltages. Even a 12V car battery can generate enough heat to start a fire if you you put a short across its terminals. But, as Carl says, if you only use it for low voltages, and with power sources like plug-in "wall warts" that can't produce a lot of current, the risk of fire is essentially zero.

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  • RanT1 commented on tedmyers's instructable Mini Emoticon Keyboard2 years ago
    Mini Emoticon Keyboard

    You have the board type set to "Arduino Uno". The Trinket uses a different CPU (the ATTiny85), so the CPU-dependent code won't work. The Uno doesn't have the direct-to-USB connection that some Arduinos (like the Leonardo) do, so it can't be used for this project.It will probably work with the Leonardo-flavored Arduinos, but you might have to tweak the code for the different CPU (I haven't tried any ATTiny85 projects, so I'm not familiar with the differences. Ladyada is a real pro, so she might already have written the code so it will work with the Leonardos, too). The simplest thing would be to just buy a Trinket from Adafruit. If you want to use a Leonardo-style Arduino, you can get them cheap on ebay. I got some micro-sized ones for about $5 apiece from a US seller. You have...

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    You have the board type set to "Arduino Uno". The Trinket uses a different CPU (the ATTiny85), so the CPU-dependent code won't work. The Uno doesn't have the direct-to-USB connection that some Arduinos (like the Leonardo) do, so it can't be used for this project.It will probably work with the Leonardo-flavored Arduinos, but you might have to tweak the code for the different CPU (I haven't tried any ATTiny85 projects, so I'm not familiar with the differences. Ladyada is a real pro, so she might already have written the code so it will work with the Leonardos, too). The simplest thing would be to just buy a Trinket from Adafruit. If you want to use a Leonardo-style Arduino, you can get them cheap on ebay. I got some micro-sized ones for about $5 apiece from a US seller. You have to be careful when shopping for them, because the naming is really confusing: there are "Mini", "Micro", and "Nano" boards that are not the same hardware. Some of them have the ATMega32U4 chip with the direct USB interface, but most of them use an FTDI chip, or a CH340 chip, for the USB like the older Arduinos do. If there's a chip on the bottom of the board in the illustrations, it's probably the FTDI or CH340.You might also need to upgrade your Arduino IDE to a 1.6.x version: I don't remember when they added support for the newer chips like the ATTiny85 and the 32U4, but I think it was after 1.0.6.

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