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8CommentsArlington, TexasJoined October 26th, 2016

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  • Special EDy commented on TueBjørn's instructable 100W LED - Flashlight1 year ago
    100W LED - Flashlight

    There are ones that look identical from most angles that have Constant Current as well as Constant Voltage. The one you should be using. Without limiting current, at 32 volts, the lowest recommended voltage, its going to be consuming over 5 amps, which is 160 watts. Maximum recommended current is 3.5 amps. This LED cannot be safely run without a CC/CV driver, most likely you are just lucky that the boost converter couldnt supply enough current to send the lithium batteries and/or LED into thermal runaway. If this circuit worked correctly, either the batteries or LED would fail spectacularly. Learn how to read a datasheet before you get yourself or someone killed. http://www.wayjun.com/Datasheet/Led/100W%20White%20LED.pdf

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  • Special EDy commented on TueBjørn's instructable 100W LED - Flashlight1 year ago
    100W LED - Flashlight

    You dont want to PWM the output of a CC/CV boost converter. You can desolder the trimpot on the boost converter which controls the output current and use a potentiometer attached to the outside of the case.

    On this exact boost converter used in the instructable, connecting the input ground to output ground will destroy the chip. Similarly, connecting the input and output positive leads will burn it up. So there is no way to run a PWM circuit without a seperate battery pack, unless you build some complicated isolation circuit.Ive fried two of these exact boost converters in this manner.

    You dont need PWM, and you need an external power source to power a PWM circuit. One of the trimpots on the boost converter chip is for limiting current. You can either use a potentiometer screwed to the outside of the case in place of the trimpot, or replace it with a digital potentiometer run by a microcontroller. This will much more effectively dim the LED.

    Not accounting for the fan's consumption or power losses inside the boost converter, a 4s battery pack is going to need to supply 6 - 7.5 amps at 100W, depending on its level of charge. Most 18650s are only rated for a maximum of 4~5 amps. Ive never seen a laptop battery 18650 over 2400mah and 5 amp maximum disharge rating, and I have over 100 cells out of laptops in my toolchest. Add to that the lack of protection circuitry, and it is a bomb waiting to go off.The highest capacity 18650s currently available are only 3000-3500mah, and this mah rating is at a fraction of an amp. Storage capacity severely degrades at high discharge rates. It is physically impossible for those 4 18650 cells to supply 100 watts to the LED for 30 minutes with current technology. Please dont mess around with l...

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    Not accounting for the fan's consumption or power losses inside the boost converter, a 4s battery pack is going to need to supply 6 - 7.5 amps at 100W, depending on its level of charge. Most 18650s are only rated for a maximum of 4~5 amps. Ive never seen a laptop battery 18650 over 2400mah and 5 amp maximum disharge rating, and I have over 100 cells out of laptops in my toolchest. Add to that the lack of protection circuitry, and it is a bomb waiting to go off.The highest capacity 18650s currently available are only 3000-3500mah, and this mah rating is at a fraction of an amp. Storage capacity severely degrades at high discharge rates. It is physically impossible for those 4 18650 cells to supply 100 watts to the LED for 30 minutes with current technology. Please dont mess around with lithium ion batteries unless you really understand what youre doing.Here is mine. http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?406385-My-DIY-100W-LED-Monster

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  • Werewolf Stilts, digitigrade legs.

    So Ive been wanting to build a pair of these for years, and had the materials sitting around for about 6 months. I started last week, and I'm almost done with one leg, but I made some enormous changes. The knee joints are 1 1/4" flanged ball bearings pressed into the thigh support, with a 1/2" stud pressed into the calf brace. After doing the knee joints, I realized that bushings would be better as they offer a higher radial load and movement of the joint is slower than a bearing necessitates. Im using 1/2" ID bronze bushings with steel pins for the remaining major joints, and 1/4" nylon bushings for the linkage joints.My costume will not allow me to use my arms for balancing, so I wanted to control the toes of the stilt with my real foot. I've added a second pivot a...

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    So Ive been wanting to build a pair of these for years, and had the materials sitting around for about 6 months. I started last week, and I'm almost done with one leg, but I made some enormous changes. The knee joints are 1 1/4" flanged ball bearings pressed into the thigh support, with a 1/2" stud pressed into the calf brace. After doing the knee joints, I realized that bushings would be better as they offer a higher radial load and movement of the joint is slower than a bearing necessitates. Im using 1/2" ID bronze bushings with steel pins for the remaining major joints, and 1/4" nylon bushings for the linkage joints.My costume will not allow me to use my arms for balancing, so I wanted to control the toes of the stilt with my real foot. I've added a second pivot at the ankle, so my real foot can swing freely of the digitigrade foot. My real foot is attached to the toes(part touching the ground) of the stilt with an extra 4bar linkage so I can control the forward to backwards tilt.Ive also used 1/8" x 1" aluminum bar in place of the sintra, I got 40 feet of it for ~$10. You can heat the 6061 aluminum with a propane torch until the flame turns orange to anneal it and make the aluminum soft enough to bend. At room temperature it is now incredibly soft and pliable. Once you get it into the shape of your thigh/calf, you can heat it in the oven at 350°F for 8 hours to reharden the aluminum to its original T6 hardness.I'll get some pictures up and a detailed video in the next week or so.Very excited!

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