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  • Tool Demagnetizer and Magnetizer

    I thought of a much easier way to make this, without ANY milling. You look in the hobby section, and get one of those facing plates (flange couplings!) like you use on a lathe to turn a bowl, except hobbyists use them to attach wheels to axles. They come with holes in the face, so pick one that fits your needs. Then go to get some magnets that have a countersink mounting center-hole. Then attach the magnets to the faceplate using countersink bolts, using either nylock nuts or locktite on your nuts. Then put the right diameter shaft in the axle hole (I'd use an old drill bit) and Presto. Want a face-plate? Find a bottle or jar cap (plastic) and carefully find the center, and then fix it temporarily to the face. If its too thick, try another. Another option are the end-caps for rods and ...

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    I thought of a much easier way to make this, without ANY milling. You look in the hobby section, and get one of those facing plates (flange couplings!) like you use on a lathe to turn a bowl, except hobbyists use them to attach wheels to axles. They come with holes in the face, so pick one that fits your needs. Then go to get some magnets that have a countersink mounting center-hole. Then attach the magnets to the faceplate using countersink bolts, using either nylock nuts or locktite on your nuts. Then put the right diameter shaft in the axle hole (I'd use an old drill bit) and Presto. Want a face-plate? Find a bottle or jar cap (plastic) and carefully find the center, and then fix it temporarily to the face. If its too thick, try another. Another option are the end-caps for rods and table legs, in plastic and rubber, in ~many~ sizes.And Presto - no special tools needed. A source of parts cheap? a certain online advertiser thats a 'bang' for the buck, and 'good' service (*I don't make anything off that*)

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  • Gorilla Hut: the Upgraded Monkey Hut Design

    I often use nylon/PVC lines in my hobbying, and find that if you have some light dishwashing gloves, a bowl of water, and some cheap masking tape, melting line ends is much easier. 1. ~BEFORE~ you cut, wrap both sides of the cut, so that you have space to cut, and afterwards enough left to melt without burning the tape. 2. Cut the line with a SHARP pair of scissors, or a fresh box-cutter. If its ragged, you'll end up with a messy meld. 3. Choose a heat source based on need: if you are doing a bunch, and the lines are small, try a candle flame. If your lines are larger, try a small butane hobby torch that can be locked on and has a stable base. Another option is using a cutting tip in a soldering iron. DONT use a heated knife/blade, short of an emergency, as you will quickly de-temper...

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    I often use nylon/PVC lines in my hobbying, and find that if you have some light dishwashing gloves, a bowl of water, and some cheap masking tape, melting line ends is much easier. 1. ~BEFORE~ you cut, wrap both sides of the cut, so that you have space to cut, and afterwards enough left to melt without burning the tape. 2. Cut the line with a SHARP pair of scissors, or a fresh box-cutter. If its ragged, you'll end up with a messy meld. 3. Choose a heat source based on need: if you are doing a bunch, and the lines are small, try a candle flame. If your lines are larger, try a small butane hobby torch that can be locked on and has a stable base. Another option is using a cutting tip in a soldering iron. DONT use a heated knife/blade, short of an emergency, as you will quickly de-temper the blade, and it will bend. 4. Melt the end of the line and as it softens, quickly dip your GLOVED index finger and thumb in the water, and then roll the end gently between your wet fingertips. If you end up with a stringy-melt bit on the end, a quick heating will maker it go away. If your ratchet straps are woven, you can lock the knots with a zip-tie pushed through the weave and cinched closed. I've done this on my backpack straps to keep them from slipping once I find a good fit. Think of it as sewing a stitch thru the webbing with the tie. If the webbing won't spread easily, DONT melt a hole, as that weakens the strap! Use a nail just big enough that has been filed to a point to spread the weave, like a sewing machine needle spreads denim to sew quickly. It can be undone by cutting the tie, and pulling it out, with no harm to the strap!Often all you have to do is examine the problem from a basic level, and then consider the simplest solutions first. The more complicated things get, the more failure points there are!I'd have eliminated half the bolts by gluing one end of the 'connector' pieces to one of the rib pieces, and the connectors to the 'X' and 'T' spine pieces. Leaves fewer pieces to be lost. For the price of all those unused nuts and bolts, you could get a small tin of PVC glue. It does limit replaceability though, as pieces will only fit in certain places. Instead of those 'bungee-ball' things, you could use releasable tie-wraps... ERF. The designer in me is taking over again. Sorry.Hope the rope tips help. And the webbing 'stitching'.

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  • 10 Unusual Uses for Baking Soda

    Yep on the superglue thickener. We R/C modelers have been using it for years (decades!), as the windshield pillars of the 1/10 styrene bodies folded badly when your model rolled - $60 plus down the drain? Just dig out a groove in the inside of the pillar, straighten it, then run a bead of superglue, and over-dust with baking soda - use enough to set all the glue. Shake or brush off the excess, and repeat until you've filled the groove. I use a repurposed denture powder bottle for 'dusting', but a DIY ink refill bottle will work as well for applying the soda. Heck, a dollar store salt-shaker would do! Think of it as a two-part epoxy, near-instant set type!

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  • Safety Pin Crocodile Clips for ETextiles

    Rachel,You might look for a product called Plastidip, most often used for coating/insulating tool handles. In a pinch, truck bed liner will do(though more expensive) or even simply paint the portions you wish to insulate with cheap (dollar store) nail polish.And if you really want, try looking in the Baby section for diaper pins, they are usually mostly covered already (*grin*) (mebbe eBay for cheap/in-bulk?)WhiteWolf McBride, R/C tweaker & 'puter techie (retired)" Think outside the box... WAY outside."

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  • WhiteWolf McBride commented on ShiftyTips's instructable How to cut a rope with itself2 years ago
    How to cut a rope with itself

    Being a Hobbyist (R/C models) I've carried a pen-knife even in HS when I shouldn't have. I have ~never~ pulled it on anyone, even in my own defence. I checked the law locally, so the one I carried was within regulations. That said, within the law, one should always have a small multitool with a blade on their person (avoiding using a brand name here). Most multitools are legal where a knife alone would not be. And if possible, have it on a lanyard & carabiner so it stays with you unless you detach it purposefully! I also carry a lighter even though I do not smoke because it can be used to cut/seal cord-ends, and in a pinch defeat tye-wrap cuffs or even tape (not that I've ever been cuffed/arrested)In an emergency, I used a lit laptop screen as an area light to find a friends' kni...

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    Being a Hobbyist (R/C models) I've carried a pen-knife even in HS when I shouldn't have. I have ~never~ pulled it on anyone, even in my own defence. I checked the law locally, so the one I carried was within regulations. That said, within the law, one should always have a small multitool with a blade on their person (avoiding using a brand name here). Most multitools are legal where a knife alone would not be. And if possible, have it on a lanyard & carabiner so it stays with you unless you detach it purposefully! I also carry a lighter even though I do not smoke because it can be used to cut/seal cord-ends, and in a pinch defeat tye-wrap cuffs or even tape (not that I've ever been cuffed/arrested)In an emergency, I used a lit laptop screen as an area light to find a friends' knife. I often use my phone's screen now as a 'soft-light' instead of its flashlight mode (that uses the camera flash and is distractingly bright) Thinking out of the box is often very helpful.I agree, This 'ible has a place here, but only to be used if there are no other methods available. In reading the various incidents, I read how a hood-cord tied one down - why not let it slip out? I NEVER let cord-ends prevent a hoodie cord from slipping loose - if grabbed/caught, it pulls out instead of dragging me along. Safety First. The cord can always easily be replaced, your life can't.WhiteWolf McBride51 years and still alive.

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